Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

Ukrainian women launch sex boycott against Russian men

March 26, 2014

Not tonight, Boris — I have headache since you take over Crimea.

A group of patriotic Ukrainian women are calling on their sister citizens to just say “Nyet” when it comes to hanky panky with Russian men as a protest over the country’s takeover of Crimea.

The sex boycott is called “Don’t Give It to a Russian,” and organizers are calling on Ukraine’s “female heroes [to] fight the enemy by whatever means.”

The campaign was named after a line from a poem by Ukrainian national hero Taras Shevchenko called “Kateryna” that reads “Fall in love, O dark-browed maidens, but not with the Moskaly [Russians].”

Katerina Venzhik, an editor of the Russian news Web site Delo.UA who lives in Kiev, said the no-sex pledge was deadly serious.

“We’ve used this campaign to draw attention to the chaos done by the Russians in Crimea: kidnapping, limiting the rights of people, preventing journalists from doing their work. And yes, Ukrainian women prefer Ukrainian men,” she told The Independent.

“We believe that in the context of military occupation, it is silly to continue to assert that all men are brothers. What Russia is doing in Ukraine is terrible, but the world sees their actions primarily through the prism of the pro-Putin propaganda.”

Many Russians were not impressed, mocking the no-sex threat on blogs and social media.

Egor Prosvirnin, top editor of the Russian nationalist Web site Sputnik & Pogrom, called the Ukrainian women prostitutes.

And Robert Shlegel, a Russian member of parliament, tweeted an unflattering, Photoshopped picture of Valeriya Novodvorskaya, a longtime Putin critic, wearing a “Don’t Give It to a Russian” T-shirt.

“With one photo, Valeriya Novodvorskaya has killed the entire Ukrainian sex-boycott,” he said.

But the Ukrainian gals remained undaunted.

“Russian women, care to join us?” the “Don’t Give It” group wrote in one recent Facebook post. “Our men are all still at home, but yours appear to be going to war.”

How liberals use cool as a weapon

March 23, 2014

By Kyle Smith
The New York Post

The hipster war on you: How liberals use cool as a weapon

Cool kids party it up at the Coachella Music Festival. Photo: Reuters

Why are good things seen as bad, and why are bad things seen as good?

Greg Gutfeld poses the question and supplies an answer in “Not Cool: The Hipster Elite and Their War On You” (Crown Forum). Gutfeld paints a picture of a coolocracy in which the world is run by star-bellied Sneetches who tell us what’s hip and we obediently keep running in and out of the belly-star-making gizmo.

Icons of cool like Robert Redford, Mark Zuckerberg, Jesse James and Yoko Ono get shredded in the book, which is as breezy, enlightening and funny as Gutfeld’s two TV shows, “The Five” and “Red Eye.”

On both shows, the way he delivers truths disguised as jokes makes him a kind of reverse Jon Stewart.

Gutfeld finds that cool warps everything. In 2012, for instance, Zuckerberg’s Facebook not only didn’t pay any net federal income tax but was actually due a refund of about $430 million. Why? Because the company (lawfully) deducted the stock options it issues to Facebook employees, many of them now deliriously wealthy because of those options. If Exxon or Koch Industries had managed that, someone might have noticed.

But because it was Facebook — a company that oozes cool out its pores — it was a one-day story that people forgot about. “If this company were something that actually made something in a factory or a field,” writes Gutfeld, “it would be roundly condemned by every single media hack on the planet.”

Never mind that companies like Exxon and Koch supply the energy without which Facebook wouldn’t work: They’re not cool.

Hipster iconoclasm dates back at least to the 1950s (James Dean, Marlon Brando), but cool remained outside the establishment until the Woodstock Generation began to take over. It imposed warped values — artfully cultivated rebellion, counterproductive liberal “social consciousness,” romantic outlaw status for murderous enemies of America (the Weather Underground, Mumia Abu-Jamal, the Boston Marathon bombers) — on the mainstream. Today Flower Power types run the media, the networks, the Hollywood studios, even the Justice Department.

But ask someone in their 80s and 90s what’s cool, Gutfeld figures, and they’d probably say something like, “Killing Nazis.”

A 1950s study that tried to measure coolness of jobs identified five factors that gave a career prestige: importance of the task performed, level of authority you have, the know-how required, the dignity of the tasks required and pay.

Scoring highest were jobs like bankers, executives, ministers and professors.

Fast-forward to today, when, writes Gutfeld, “the Labor Department reports that only 47% of Americans have a full-time job. That’s because it’s hard to get full-time work as a maker of artisanal tricycles.” “Raising awareness” didn’t strike anyone as much of a career in the 1950s, but a recent survey of 350 college students discovered that “social consciousness,” i.e., daft activities like collecting signatures on petitions for Greenpeace, was among the accepted cool traits.

The end result of eco-minded hipster thinking is, for example, the San Francisco ban on plastic shopping bags. This well-intentioned move in favor of all that is green and natural actually wound up killing people. Why? Because when you use bags to transport food, bacteria collects in them.

Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook paid no net federal income tax in 2012.Photo: AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

Reusing that Earth-friendly tote gradually turns it into a chemical weapon. The ban, declared a University of Pennsylvania study, “is associated with a 46% increase in death from food-borne illnesses. That implies an increase of 5.5 annual deaths for the county.” (The researchers added that this was a conservative estimate.)

So the bag ban is basically a serial killer on the loose. But it’s cool because we probably saved the lives of at least five seagulls, and more important, it makes us feel cool. More cities are sure to follow. A similar jihad against DDT, which saved an estimated 500 million lives according to The Economist, has led to the deaths of perhaps millions in Africa, where cool environmentalism meets cold hard reality. Now a few groovy artisanal types are sounding the alarm about vaccines, with predictably depressing results.

A year ago a Florida county saw its first death from whooping cough in decades. The victim, a baby, had parents who decided not to vaccinate.

Vaccines, DDT, genetically modified foods — all these things are unnatural or impure, hence suspect.

“Purity is a big thing with the coolerati,” notes Gutfeld. “But, like cool, it exists separate from the notions of good and evil. Pure sugar is delicious. How about pure cocaine? How about pure horses–t?” That depends: Is it locally sourced?

OK, so why aren’t conservatives cool? Gutfeld makes a valid point: “From my experience being around conservatives, it’s extremely frustrating how dismissive they are of ‘weird’ things, and that hurts them.”

Gutfeld chooses the music that backs his segments on “The Five” and “my choices are never met with ‘That’s good’ or ‘That sucks.’ It’s always rewarded with anguished looks on the other panelists’ faces and the two-word review, ‘That’s weird.’ ”

Automatically dismissing tradition and latching onto whatever’s new isn’t cool. But neither is being closed-minded.

Turkey’s Erdogan Plans To Block Social Networking Sites Including You Tube and Facebook Because of Damaging Disclosures of Corruption

March 7, 2014

Turkey: The Turkish Prime Minister says he is ready to block sites like You Tube and   Facebook as he tries to curb the wave of damaging disclosures fuelling new   allegations of corruption

Turkish Priminister ready to ban sites such as Facebook after damaging leaks

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Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatens to ban social networking sites Photo: AP

By AFP

Turkey’s embattled prime minister has warned that his government could ban   social media networks YouTube and Facebook after a raft of online leaks   added momentum to a spiralling corruption scandal.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan has already tightened his government’s grip over the   Internet, generating criticism at home and abroad about rights in the   EU-hopeful country.

“There are new steps we will take in that sphere after March 30… including a   ban (on YouTube, Facebook),” Erdogan told private ATV television in an   interview.

Erdogan’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has come under mounting   pressure since last week, when audio recordings were leaked in which Erdogan   and his son allegedly discuss how to hide vast sums of money.

The Turkish premier dismissed them as a “vile” and “immoral” montage by rivals   ahead of key local elections on March 30.

A series of other online leaks showed Erdogan meddling in trade deals and   court cases.

Erdogan’s government has been shaken by a high-level corruption scandal that   erupted in mid-December and ensnared the premier’s key political and   business allies.

Erdogan has accused loyalists of ally-turned-opponent Fethullah Gulen, an   influential Muslim cleric based in the United States, of orchestrating the   graft probe.

The Turkish strongman has responded by purging police and passing laws to   increase his grip over the Internet and the judiciary.

Thailand: Anti-Government Protesters Take to Facebook, Other Sociel Media to Attack Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra

February 20, 2014

Workers leave a business building owned by SC Asset Corp as anti-government protesters gather outside during a rally in Bangkok February 20, 2014. REUTERS-Athit Perawongmetha

Workers leave a business building owned by SC Asset Corp as anti-government protesters gather outside during a rally in Bangkok February 20, 2014. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

(Reuters) – Protesters campaigning to oust Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra turned to Facebook and other social media to attack businesses linked to her family on Thursday and rallied outside the offices of a property developer whose share price tumbled.

Yingluck’s government appears increasingly hemmed in by opponents and the judicial system, lacking the fiscal powers to fund key policies and warned by a court on Wednesday that it cannot use a state of emergency to disperse protesters.

Four protesters and a police officer were killed on Tuesday, in the deadliest clashes since the unrest began in November, when police attempted to reclaim sites near government buildings that have been occupied for weeks.

The protesters are seeking to unseat Yingluck and stamp out what they see as the malign influence of her brother, Thaksin Shinawatra, a self-exiled former premier regarded by many as the real power behind the government.

About 500 protesters gathered outside the Bangkok offices of SC Asset Corp, a property developer controlled by the Shinawatra family, waving Thai flags and blowing whistles.

“We will hamper all Shinawatra businesses,” protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban told supporters at a rally on Wednesday night. “If you love your country, stop using Shinawatra products and do everything you can so that their business fails.”

Yingluck was executive chairwoman of the company before being swept to power in a landslide election victory in 2011.

Shares in SC Asset fell 4.3 percent on Thursday, following a similar fall the previous day. Shares in M-Link Asia Corp, a mobile handset distributor with links to the Shinawatras, have also lost almost 10 percent over the past two days.

Anusorn Iamsa-ard, deputy spokesman for Yingluck’s Puea Thai Party, said the building the protesters targeted had nothing to do with her.

“The prime minister has no shares in SC Asset,” he said.

“The thing that will worry her is the impact of the protest today, and the fact employees of the office tower had to leave, on the Thai economy overall. But the campaign against Shinawatra businesses will not weaken her resolve to see Thailand through this crisis.”

Other stocks affected include telecoms group Shin Corp, founded by Thaksin before he entered politics, and its mobile affiliate Advanced Info Service Pcl (AIS). Shin Corp said it no longer has any connection with the Shinawatra family.

“We should change our service provider and stop using AIS … it’s easy to change SIM cards these days,” said a post on the “No Thaksin” Facebook page.

“I ask the people to stop using the tyrant Thaksin’s products. Stop using AIS … so we can teach Thaksin a lesson … and so he can know that hell really exists,” a user posted in response.

Yingluck has headed a caretaker government with limited spending powers since calling a snap election in December. Voting on February 2 was disrupted by her opponents, and it could be months before a new government can be installed.

An anti-corruption agency this week filed charges against her over a soured rice subsidy scheme that has stoked middle-class anger and left hundreds of thousands of farmers, her natural backers, unpaid.

More than 1,000 farmers, many riding in farm trucks, were travelling in convoy towards Bangkok from the rice-growing central plains and were due to reach the city overnight or on Friday.

Chada Thaiseth, a former member of parliament, said he would lead farmers on Friday to Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi Airport, blockaded for eight days by royalist, anti-Thaksin “yellow shirts” in 2008.

“We are not sure where we will set up camp, but we will not leave the capital until we are paid for every grain of rice sold,” Chada told Reuters.

“LET THEM COME”

Yingluck’s “red shirt” supporters plan a rally in Nakhon Ratchasima, northeast of the capital, on Sunday, when they will decide what to do next.

“We are not saying that we want to come out and fight, but it seems that Suthep is challenging us red shirts to come out and face off,” spokesman Thanawut Wichaidit said.

“Let them come,” Suthep said in a midday speech to protesters in Bangkok. “Do they dare?”

The protests are the biggest since deadly political unrest in 2010, when Thaksin’s red shirt supporters paralyzed Bangkok in an attempt to remove a government led by the Democrat Party, now the opposition.

More than 90 people were killed and 2,000 wounded when Suthep, at the time a deputy prime minister, sent in troops.

The protests are the latest installment of an eight-year political battle broadly pitting the Bangkok middle class and royalist establishment against the mostly rural supporters of Yingluck and Thaksin.

Demonstrators accuse Thaksin of nepotism and corruption and say that, prior to being toppled by the army in a 2006 coup, he used taxpayers’ money for populist subsidies and easy loans that bought him the loyalty of millions in the country’s populous north and northeast.

Yingluck has continued her brother’s policies, but the rice scheme, which paid farmers way above the market rate, has proved ruinously expensive and has run into funding problems.

Thai rice prices fell 15 percent this week as the government rushed to sell some of its record stockpiles to prop up the scheme. An Indonesian trade official said there were “indications” Thai suppliers were dumping the grain in Indonesia.

Thailand’s anti-corruption body began an investigation last month into the rice scheme and said on Tuesday it was filing charges against Yingluck. She was summoned to hear the charges on February 27.

Police have made no further moves against the protesters, whose barricades and encampments are still blocking several big intersections in central Bangkok, since gun battles erupted during a security operation on Tuesday.

(Additional reporting by Aukkarapon Niyomyat; Writing by Alex Richardson; Editing by Nick Macfie and Robert Birsel)

Anti-government protesters gather outside a business building owned by SC Asset Corp during a rally in Bangkok February 20, 2014. REUTERS-Athit Perawongmetha

Anti-government protesters gather outside a business building owned by SC Asset Corp during a rally in Bangkok February 20, 2014. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

The “Dirty Tricks” Used By British Spies, As Revealed By Edward Snowden

February 8, 2014

Revelations from documents taken from NSA leaked by Edward Snowden

  • Outline techniques used by Joint Threat Research and Intelligence Group
  • Spy unit whose goal is to ‘destroy, deny, degrade [and] disrupt’ enemies

By Jill Reilly

 

British spies employed ‘dirty tricks’ including ‘honey traps’ to trap nations, hackers, terror groups, suspected criminals and arms dealers, according to leaked documents.

The bombshell revelations have been made public through the release of documents taken from the National Security Agency by whistle-blower Edward Snowden.

The Powerpoint slides outline techniques apparently used by the Joint  Threat Research and Intelligence Group (JTRIG), a British spy unit whose  goal is to ‘destroy, deny, degrade [and] disrupt’ enemies.

British spies employed 'dirty tricks' including honey traps' in a bid to trap nations, hackers, terror groups, suspected criminals and arms dealers

British spies employed ‘dirty tricks’ including honey traps’ in a bid to trap nations, hackers, terror groups, suspected criminals and arms dealers

 

The slides from 2010 and 2012, published by NBC News show that  the JTRIG completed their mission by ‘discrediting’ adversaries through  misinformation and hacking their communications.

Two main methods of attack detailed in the ‘Effects’ campaigns are cyber operations and propaganda campaigns.

The bombshell revelations have been made public through the release of documents taken from the National Security Agency by whistleblower Edward Snowden

The bombshell revelations have been made public through the release of documents taken from the National Security Agency by whistleblower Edward Snowden

 

JTRIG, which is part of the NSA’s British counterpart, the cyber spy agency known as GCHQ, used Twitter, Flickr, Facebook and YouTube for deception, mass messaging and ‘pushing stories’.

Another strategy is ‘false flag’  operations – this is when British agents carry out online actions that are  designed to look like they were performed by one of Britain’s  adversaries.

The main cyber attack is the ‘distributed denial of service’ (DDoS) attack.

This is when computers are taken over by hackers and they bombard a website’s  host computers with requests for information causing it to crash -  this is a method successfully used by Wikileaks hackers.

Earlier this week it was revealed that JTRIG agents issued their DDoS on  Anonymous chat rooms, preventing its users from communicating with one  another.

In one case, reported the BBC,  agents are said to have tricked a hacker nicknamed P0ke who claimed to  have stolen data from the US government. They did this by sending him a  link to a BBC article entitled: ‘Who loves the hacktivists?’

Eric King, an attorney who currently teaches IT law at the London School of  Economics, told NBC it is ‘remarkable’ that the GCHQ has become so adept at launching DDoS attacks without ‘clear lawful authority,’  particularly because the British government has criticised similar strategies used by other  governments.

‘GCHQ has no clear authority to send a virus or conduct cyber-attacks,’ he said. ‘Hacking is one of the most  invasive methods of surveillance.’

According to notes on the 2012 documents, a computer virus called Ambassadors  Reception was ‘used in a variety of different areas’ and was ‘very  effective.’

More…

 

 

 

When sent to adversaries, says the presentation, the virus will ‘encrypt itself, delete all emails, encrypt all files, make [the] screen shake’ and block the computer user from logging on.

One of the ways to block a target communicating reads: ‘Bombard their phone with text messages, bombard their phone with calls, delete their online presence, block up their fax machine.’

The slide details examples of how this was used in Afghanistan including significantly disrupting the Taliban, sending targets a text message ‘every 10 seconds or so’ and ‘calling targets on a regular basis’.

The British cyber spies also used blog posts and information spread via blogs in an operation against Iran.

Mobile phone user
A young woman looking at Facebook website on laptop computer

One of the ways to stop a target communicating reads: ‘Bombard their phone with text messages, bombard their phone with calls, delete their online presence, block up their fax machine’

 

 

The same 2012 presentation describes the ‘honey trap’ method of discrediting a target commenting it is ‘very successful’ when it works.

The individual is lured ‘to go somewhere on the internet, or a physical location’ where they are then ‘met by a friendly face.’

It does not give any examples of when the honey trap has been used by British agents, but the same slide also details how ‘paranoia’ can be heightened by changing a target’s photo on a social networking website – the slide reads ‘You have been warned JTRIG is about!’

A programme called ‘Royal Concierge’ took advantage of hotel reservation systems to track the  location of foreign diplomats and the slides encourage agents to monitor targets through ‘close access technical operations’.

It also suggests they question ‘Can we influence hotel choice? Can we cancel their visits?’

According to reports in Der Spiegel last year, British intelligence tapped the reservations systems of over 350 top hotels around the world for the past three years to set up the programme.

Using the GCHQ’s SIGINT (signal-intelligence) program it was used to spy on trade delegations, foreign diplomats, and other targets with a taste for the high life.

NBC news reported GCHQ would not comment on the newly published documents or on JTRIG’s operations.

In a statement it told them: ‘All of GCHQ’s work is carried out in accordance with a strict legal and policy framework,’ said the statement, ‘which ensure[s] that our activities are authorized, necessary and proportionate, and that there is rigorous oversight, including from the Secretary of State, the Interception and Intelligence Services Commissioners and the Parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee. All of our operational processes rigorously support this position.’

Read more:

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2554529/British-spies-dirty-tricks-inc
luding-honey-traps-deleting-online-profiles-intimidate-trap-enemies-leaked-
Snowden-documents.html#ixzz2sl5Zkgnw

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Women Fight Over Justin Bieber: Sexy Bad Girl Chantel Jeffries Stabs Her Rival

January 29, 2014
Aftermath: Monica Crout shows off her injuries after the alleged fight with Jeffries

Aftermath: Monica Crout shows off her injuries after the alleged fight with Jeffries

  • Chantel Jeffries, 21, was accused of assault with a deadly weapon after falling out spectacularly with friends three years ago
  • Witnesses claim she stabbed a friend five times after issuing Facebook threat to ‘beat s**t’ out of girl in a group called ‘The B***h Squad’
  • The daughter of a former Marine colonel, now linked to Justin Bieber after she was there at his drag race arrest and joined him on break in Panama
  • Those who knew her in high school claim she has always been desperate for a famous boyfriend
  • But others remember a quiet, very intelligent ‘geek’ girl and are shocked by her alleged transformation

By Will Payne In Jacksonville, North Carolina

Justin Bieber’s new ‘girlfriend’ allegedly tried to plunge a knife into a teenage rival at least five times after an argument on Facebook, MailOnline can reveal today.

Bad girl Chantel Jeffries – who was with the Baby star when he was arrested in Miami last week and then accompanied him on his break in Panama – first threatened to ‘beat the s**t out of’ her former best friend on Facebook, according to a police report.

Then she allegedly drove round to a family home in Jacksonville, North Carolina, where she thought the girl was hanging out.

Transformation: Jeffries in her high school yearbook and her mugshot after being arrested

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Transformation: Jeffries in her high school yearbook and her mugshot after being arrested

Transformation: Jeffries in her high school  yearbook and her mugshot after being arrested for assault with a deadly  weapon in 2011. Charges were eventually dropped with Jeffries agreeing  to pay court costs

 

Spotlight: Jeffries was thrust into the public eye after Justin Bieber was arrested for drag racing while she was in a Lamborghini with him in Florida last week. She then joined him on a break in Panama, leading to claims they were an 'item'

Spotlight: Jeffries was thrust into the public eye after Justin Bieber was  arrested for drag racing while she was in a Lamborghini with him in  Florida last week. She joined him on a break in Panama, above

 

Shocking: Tia Renzulli ¿ who is now training to be a nurse ¿ described the terrifying knife attack on Monica Crout, right, which happened on her driveway in a quiet suburban cul-de-sac

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Shocking: Tia Renzulli ¿ who is now training to be a nurse ¿ described the terrifying knife attack on Monica Crout, right, which happened on her driveway in a quiet suburban cul-de-sac

Shocking: Tia Renzulli – who is now training to be a nurse – described the terrifying knife attack on Monica Crout, right, which happened on her  driveway in a quiet suburban cul-de-sac

Her target wasn’t there but she attacked another 18-year-old, stabbing her terrified victim in the forearm, leaving her with horrible wounds, according to witnesses.

They claim she only stopped slashing the girl when another friend – Tia Renzullia – jumped in and fought her off. They say Jeffries then fled the scene leaving victim Monica Crout covered in blood.

The argument apparently started when Jeffries took exception to a group of girls, Monica, Tia and Alyssa Daras, who called themselves, ‘The B***h Squad’.

The former high school students told MailOnline Jeffries thought she was coolest girl in town and wanted to prove a point.

Jeffries’ arrest for assault with a deadly weapon – which happened three years ago – has been widely reported since her wild night out with troubled Justin Bieber.

The Miami blow-out culminated in the singer being arrested for DUI, drag racing and resisting arrest without violence.

Nasty: Jeffries' former friends turned enemies claim a knife was used, possibly a box-cutter

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Nasty: Jeffries' former friends turned enemies claim a knife was used, possibly a box-cutter

Nasty: Jeffries’ former friends turned enemies claim a knife was used, possibly a box-cutter

 

Jealousy: Alyssa Daras, right, who claims to have been best friends with Jeffries, alleges Crout, left, was attacked because she didn't want to be her friend anymore

Jealousy: Alyssa Daras, right, who claims to have been best friends with Jeffries, alleges Crout, left, was attacked because she didn’t want to be her friend anymore

 

But this is the first time the shocking details of the brutal attack have been made public. And they will stun the tens of millions of Bieber fans around the world, especially now the heartthrob is rumored to be in a relationship with Jeffries, 21.

Despite the number of witnesses and the official police report seen by MailOnline, Chantel insists she has never stabbed anyone. She released a statement on Wednesday, saying: ‘I have not been arrested five times as has been stated in the media, nor am I guilty of physically assaulting anyone, in any way shape or form.’

She went on: ‘I am a full time student who had enjoyed a normal lifestyle, free from public scrutiny and  criticism, until now. What has happened to me is wrong.’

Her attorney Matt Morgan explained that Chantel was arrested when she was  18 for a misdemeanor assault, but it was ultimately dismissed due to  insufficient evidence. Other than that, he says she has only had  ‘traffic violations’.

But  Alyssa Daras– who claims she was best friends with Jeffries for years –  is in no doubt about what happened at around 9.45pm on February 2, 2011.

And she also describes Jeffries as a ‘groupie’ who has been desperate to  land a famous boyfriend since she finished high-school.

Meanwhile, speaking exclusively to MailOnline, Alyssa’s friend Tia Renzulli – who  is now training to be a nurse – described the terrifying attack, which  she says happened on her driveway in a quiet, suburban cul-de-sac. She  also explained the reasons behind it.

'Groupie': Former friends of Jeffries claim that she has been desperate to land a famous boyfriend since she left high school

‘Groupie’: Former friends of Jeffries claim that she has been desperate to land a famous boyfriend since she left high school

 

Bloody: Jeffries has hit out at claims about her run-ins with the law. But friends have made disturbing claims to MailOnline about a violent altercation with a group of girls called 'The B***h Squad'

Bloody: Jeffries has hit out at claims about her run-ins with the law. But  friends have made disturbing claims to MailOnline about a violent  altercation with a group of girls called ‘The B***h Squad’

 

She said: ‘There was a group of three of four of us who started calling ourselves, ‘The B***h Squad in high school.

‘It was just a joke, but it ended up getting pretty big. Everyone was talking about ‘The B***h Squad. People even started making t-shirts with the name written on it.

‘Chantel didn’t like it so she started talking s**t. One of the girls in the B***h Squad was Alyssa and she used to be best friends with Chantel. They fell out over something, so Chantel started saying we were whack and that she couldn’t stand Alyssa.

‘One evening she started saying all  this to Monica and me on Facebook, she was saying, ‘who the f**k is she, I’m coming to beat her up’. Alyssa is tiny and skinny and she wouldn’t  fight anyone.

‘Alyssa was at home, but I told Chantel that she was actually at my house. A few  minutes she later pulled up outside my driveway with a guy friend of  hers so we went out to meet her on my front porch.

‘She had her hands in her pockets and her and Monica started arguing. The  guy came over and grabbed me and Chantel pulled out a knife.

‘Monica put her arm up to protect herself, so she stabbed her all up and down  her arm. Monica shouted “she stabbed me”, but by that point Chantel had  thrown the knife, which looked like a box-cutter, towards our mail box.

 

Target: Alyssa Daras, left, was the intended victim of the attack, witnessed by Tia's mother Darline Renzulli, right, after the Facebook spat turned ugly. Renzulli claimed: 'There was blood everywhere'

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Target: Alyssa Daras, left, was the intended victim of the attack, witnessed by Tia's mother Darline Renzulli, right, after the Facebook spat turned ugly. Renzulli claimed: 'There was blood everywhere'

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Target: Alyssa Daras, left, was the intended  victim of the attack, witnessed by Tia’s mother Darline Renzulli, right, after the Facebook spat turned ugly. Renzulli claimed: ‘There was blood everywhere’

 

 

Inevitable: Alyssa added: 'I wasn¿t even surprised when I heard about the thing with Justin Bieber. She wasn't going to stop until she became famous. She will be enjoying this now'

Inevitable: Alyssa added: ‘I wasn’t even surprised when I heard about the thing with Justin Bieber.  She wasn’t going to stop until she became famous. She will be enjoying  this now’

 

The B***h Squad: Jeffries seems to have made some bitter enemies in (from left) Alyssa Daras, Tia Renzulli, unknown friend and Monica Crout

The B***h Squad: Jeffries seems to have made some bitter enemies in (from left) Alyssa Daras, Tia Renzulli, unknown friend and Monica Crout

 

‘She started saying “I didn’t stab anyone, I didn’t do anything”, but I looked over and Monica had blood all up her arm.

‘I was obviously really angry and I freaked out and went for Chantel because she had stabbed my best friend. She ran for her car and left the guy who she brought with her just standing there outside my house.

‘My mom called the cops. I guess they arrested her further up the street and she denied the whole thing.’

Tia’s mom Darliene was at home at the time of the attack. She said: ‘It happened right outside my house, I couldn’t believe it. I grew up in Detroit and I wanted to move out here because it is a safe place for my kids to live.

‘You don’t expect there to be a stabbing on your doorstep. It was crazy, it was something I’ve never experienced before.

More…

 

‘I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. It happened really fast. She got out of the car, dropped something, went back and picked it up and then started stabbing Monica. There was blood everywhere.

‘My daughter was right next to her and she grabbed Chantel by the hair and pulled her off Monica. They were  fighting and I ran up to Monica to try to bandage her arm. I called the  police and they showed up five minutes later. Monica went to hospital  and had her wounds stitched up.’

Jeffries was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon. But she then made  allegations to police, saying Tia had actually assaulted her when she  fought her off Monica.

Monica  – who is now in the Navy and lives in Washington – was due to ship out  to boot camp just weeks later. Tia and Darliene say she did not want to  go through the drama of a court case.

She also wanted to protect Tia, so she did not go forward with the  prosecution. Jeffries was ordered to pay court costs and the case was  discharged.

Her original  target, Alyssa, has not spoken to her former best friend since that day, but she has some stark words of advice for Bieber.

Party girl: Bieber and Jeffries had been partying in SET nightclub in Miami Beach, before leaving at 2am last Thursday. Bieber posted a picture on Instagram, writing: '@chanteljeffries taking me for a ride in the lambo'

Party girl: Bieber and Jeffries had been partying in SET nightclub in Miami  Beach, before leaving at 2am last Thursday. Bieber posted a picture on  Instagram, writing: ‘@chanteljeffries taking me for a ride in the lambo’

 

Exposure: Jeffries has had to deny that she was hawking around the story of her time with Bieber for $20,000

Exposure: Jeffries has had to deny that she was hawking around the story of her time with Bieber for $20,000

 

Busted: Bieber was arrested for DUI drag racing in Miami last week. the troubled star escaped the media attention, taking Jeffries with him to Panama

Busted: Bieber was arrested for DUI drag racing in Miami last week. the troubled star escaped the media attention, taking Jeffries with him to Panama

 

She said: ‘Chantel is a groupie. Towards the end of high school, she always wanted to date someone famous so she could get out of Jacksonville and become a model.

‘When we were in middle school together she was very smart, but she became obsessed with fame. This thing with Justin has finally given her what she wanted.

‘If someone famous was making a personal appearance in a club she would go. She would go all the way to New York sometimes. When she started acting like that I stopped spending time with her.

‘I wasn’t even surprised when I heard about the thing with Justin Bieber. She wasn’t going to stop until she became famous. She will be enjoying this now.’

Alyssa added: ‘We were best friends, but she wanted to beat me up because I didn’t want to be her friend anymore. She had started telling people my business and criticizing my family, so I decided to cut her out. Because of that Monica ended up getting stabbed.’

The assault was Chantel’s last brush with the law until Thursday when she was caught up in Justin Bieber’s arrest.

The pair had been partying in SET nightclub in Miami Beach, before leaving at 2am.

Bieber even posted a picture of his new beau on Instagram, writing: ‘@chanteljeffries taking me for a ride in the lambo’.

About two hours later the singer was  pulled over by police after allegedly taking part in a drag race in a  residential area. Officers said he had been drinking beer, was under the influence of anti-depressants and had been smoking marijuana.

On Tuesday it was announced that the Beauty and the Beat star – who fled  to Panama for a beach holiday with Jeffries – will appear in court on  Valentine’s Day for an arraignment on charges of DUI, resisting arrest  and driving with an expired license.

Jeffries  – who is represented by Wilhelmina modelling agency – was not arrested  at the time and will face no charges in relation to the incident.

But the profile-boosting incident definitely fits in with the image she has tried to cultivate since moving to Miami to study and launch her  modelling career.

She has  more than half-a-million followers on Instagram and regularly posts  pouting ‘selfies’ and professional shots of herself wearing next to  nothing.

Bieber is not the  first celebrity she has been romantically linked to as she previously  dated Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson and was rumored to be involved with Sean “Diddy” Combs’ son Justin Combs.

Alyssa says she used to always talk about dating Justin, before she even met him.

'Wild child': Friends claim Jeffries boasted that she was forced to leave California because of her bad behavior

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'Wild child': Friends claim Jeffries boasted that she was forced to leave California because of her bad behavior

‘Wild child’: Friends claim Jeffries boasted that she was forced to leave California because of her bad behavior

Home: Jeffries used to live with her mother in this respectable house in Jacksonville before moving to Florida to become a face on the party and modelling circuit

Home: Jeffries used to live with her mother in this respectable house in  Jacksonville before moving to Florida to become a face on the party and  modelling circuit

 

But despite her showbiz pedigree, the New York Post reported on Tuesday she was trying to sell the story of her night with Bieber to the highest bidder.

She apparently changed her mind when he took her on vacation to Panama. On Tuesday she denied these claims. She said: ‘I would never sell my story’.

MailOnline has learned Jeffries is actually the daughter of a former high ranking officer in the US Marine Corps and was a, ‘a bit of a geek’ at high school.

Former classmates at private Massaponax high school in Virginia have told how she was very quiet, wore jeans and sweaters, loved playing soccer and rarely went out.

Because of the role of her father, Colonel Edward Jeffries, she moved around a lot throughout her childhood.

She was born in California, went to  middle school in Jacksonville and high school in Virginia, before moving back to Jacksonville with her mother Kathleen, via brief stints in  Massachusetts and California.

It is believed Jeffries’ father now works for a military training company. He lives away from the family home in Jacksonville, apparently  splitting his time between Virginia and San Diego, areas which both have large military bases. Before heading to Florida, where she now lives in Miami, she was living with her mother Kathleen.

In the driving seat: Jeffries' former friend said that she'd be 'happy now' after bagging Bieber and had talked about doing so some years ago

In the driving seat: Jeffries’ former friend said that she’d be ‘happy now’ after bagging Bieber and had talked about doing so some years ago

 

One friend who remembers Chantel before the revealing outfits and blonde hair is Briana Ramirez.

Briana, 19, and Jeffries played on the same soccer team at Massaponax.

She said: ‘She was really quiet at school. I am friends with her on  Facebook and I saw some of the stuff she posted, but I had no idea she  was famous. It’s so weird.

‘She definitely doesn’t look the same. She didn’t even have blonde hair. She was just a regular girl, who used to drive her mum’s mini-van to soccer practice. Thinking of her in a Lamborghini is strange.

‘She had a long term boyfriend through high school. She wasn’t a party girl, she wasn’t even that popular, she was always in the background. The  other girls would go out and they’d ask her if she wanted to come and  she would say, ‘No, I don’t think so’.

‘She always looked really young and  when I knew her she wouldn’t wear anything provocative, she didn’t even  wear much make-up. She would just dress in jeans, t-shirts and sweaters.

‘As far as I remember she graduated early, so she was pretty smart. I had  no idea about the stabbing claims, but that seems so out of character.

‘It seems like she just left Virginia in the past when she moved, I don’t  think she ever looked back and she never mentions that she’s from here.  That has upset a few people.’

Another school friend, Matthew Hovey said: ‘I didn’t know how well she was  doing for herself “fame wise” and I’m shocked to hear she was supposed  to have stabbed a girl. The girl I knew was never really  confrontational. Quiet, and just trying to not cause a scene.’

Opportunity: A former friend told MailOnline that Jeffries, left, 'was very smart, but she became obsessed with fame. This thing with Justin has finally given her what she wanted'

Opportunity: A former friend told MailOnline that Jeffries, left, ‘was very smart,  but she became obsessed with fame. This thing with Justin has finally  given her what she wanted’

 

Roots: Briana Ramirez, left, who attended school in Virginia with Jeffries, who is the daughter of former Marine colonel, Edward Jeffries, right, said she was intelligent and quiet when she knew her

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Roots: Briana Ramirez, left, who attended school in Virginia with Jeffries, who is the daughter of former Marine colonel, Edward Jeffries, right, said she was intelligent and quiet when she knew her

Roots: Briana Ramirez, left, who attended school in Virginia with Jeffries, who is the daughter of former Marine  colonel, Edward Jeffries, right, said she was intelligent and quiet when she knew her

 

Change: Briana told MailOnline: 'She was just a regular girl, who used to drive her mum¿s mini-van to soccer practice. Thinking of her in a Lamborghini is strange'

Change: Briana told MailOnline: ‘She was just a regular girl, who used  to drive her mum’s mini-van to soccer practice. Thinking of her in a  Lamborghini is strange’

 

After graduating she spent time in California and it has been suggested that is where she started to reinvent herself. Darliene and Tia Renzulli say Chantel used to boast that she had been forced to move to Jacksonville because she had got into trouble on the West Coast.

But even after settling in Jacksonville, some people saw her as a normal, well-behaved girl. She worked as a waitress at Marrakesh, a middle-eastern restaurant less than a mile from her house. Her old boss Sami Raman remembers her fondly.

He said: ‘I worked with her for about a year and she was just a normal girl. I knew her dad well and he is a great guy. They’re a good family. She went to work, went to community college across the street to study pharmaceuticals and then went home.

‘One of my friends still talks to her and he said that the night Bieber was arrested she had been working, doing a video, she wasn’t drunk, she’d done nothing wrong. I don’t think you can say she is a bad influence on Justin Bieber, he’s the one who looks like he’s self-destructing.’
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Your Personal Data May Hemorrhage To Spy Agencies Via App Data Collection

January 27, 2014
  • US and UK spy agencies piggyback on commercial data
  • Details can include age, location and sexual orientation
  • Documents also reveal targeted tools against individual phones

By James Ball
The Guardian

Angry Birds.

GCHQ documents use Angry Birds – reportedly downloaded more than 1.7bn times – as a case study for app data collection.

The National Security Agency and its UK counterpart GCHQ have been developing capabilities to take advantage of “leaky” smartphone apps, such as the wildly popular Angry Birds game, that transmit users’ private information across the internet, according to top secret documents.

 

The data pouring onto communication networks from the new generation of iPhone and Android apps ranges from phone model and screen size to personal details such as age, gender and location. Some apps, the documents state, can share users’ most sensitive information such as sexual orientation – and one app recorded in the material even sends specific sexual preferences such as whether or not the user may be a swinger.

Many smartphone owners will be unaware of the full extent this information is being shared across the internet, and even the most sophisticated would be unlikely to realise that all of it is available for the spy agencies to collect.

Dozens of classified documents, provided to the Guardian by whistleblower Edward Snowden and reported in partnership with the New York Times and ProPublica, detail the NSA and GCHQ efforts to piggyback on this commercial data collection for their own purposes.

Scooping up information the apps are sending about their users allows the agencies to collect large quantities of mobile phone data from their existing mass surveillance tools – such as cable taps, or from international mobile networks – rather than solely from hacking into individual mobile handsets.

Exploiting phone information and location is a high-priority effort for the intelligence agencies, as terrorists and other intelligence targets make substantial use of phones in planning and carrying out their activities, for example by using phones as triggering devices in conflict zones. The NSA has cumulatively spent more than $1bn in its phone targeting efforts.

The disclosures also reveal how much the shift towards smartphone browsing could benefit spy agencies’ collection efforts.

golden nugget
A May 2010 NSA slide on the agency’s ‘perfect scenario’ for obtaining data from mobile apps. Photograph: Guardian

One slide from a May 2010 NSA presentation on getting data from smartphones – breathlessly titled “Golden Nugget!” – sets out the agency’s “perfect scenario”: “Target uploading photo to a social media site taken with a mobile device. What can we get?”

The question is answered in the notes to the slide: from that event alone, the agency said it could obtain a “possible image”, email selector, phone, buddy lists, and “a host of other social working data as well as location”.

In practice, most major social media sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, strip photos of identifying location metadata (known as EXIF data) before publication. However, depending on when this is done during upload, such data may still, briefly, be available for collection by the agencies as it travels across the networks.

Depending on what profile information a user had supplied, the documents suggested, the agency would be able to collect almost every key detail of a user’s life: including home country, current location (through geolocation), age, gender, zip code, martial status – options included “single”, “married”, “divorced”, “swinger” and more – income, ethnicity, sexual orientation, education level, and number of children.

The agencies also made use of their mobile interception capabilities to collect location information in bulk, from Google and other mapping apps. One basic effort by GCHQ and the NSA was to build a database geolocating every mobile phone mast in the world – meaning that just by taking tower ID from a handset, location information could be gleaned.

A more sophisticated effort, though, relied on intercepting Google Maps queries made on smartphones, and using them to collect large volumes of location information.

So successful was this effort that one 2008 document noted that “[i]t effectively means that anyone using Google Maps on a smartphone is working in support of a GCHQ system.”

The information generated by each app is chosen by its developers, or by the company that delivers an app’s adverts. The documents do not detail whether the agencies actually collect the potentially sensitive details some apps are capable of storing or transmitting, but any such information would likely qualify as content, rather than metadata.

Data collected from smartphone apps is subject to the same laws and minimisation procedures as all other NSA activity – procedures that the US president, Barack Obama, suggested may be subject to reform in a speech 10 days ago. But the president focused largely on the NSA’s collection of the metadata from US phone calls and made no mention in his address of the large amounts of data the agency collects from smartphone apps.

The latest disclosures could also add to mounting public concern about how the technology sector collects and uses information, especially for those outside the US, who enjoy fewer privacy protections than Americans. A January poll for the Washington Post showed 69% of US adults were already concerned about how tech companies such as Google used and stored their information.

The documents do not make it clear how much of the information that can be taken from apps is routinely collected, stored or searched, nor how many users may be affected. The NSA says it does not target Americans and its capabilities are deployed only against “valid foreign intelligence targets”.

The documents do set out in great detail exactly how much information can be collected from widely popular apps. One document held on GCHQ’s internal Wikipedia-style guide for staff details what can be collected from different apps. Though it uses Android apps for most of its examples, it suggests much of the same data could be taken from equivalent apps on iPhone or other platforms.

The GCHQ documents set out examples of what information can be extracted from different ad platforms, using perhaps the most popular mobile phone game of all time, Angry Birds – which has reportedly been downloaded more than 1.7bn times – as a case study.

From some app platforms, relatively limited, but identifying, information such as exact handset model, the unique ID of the handset, software version, and similar details are all that are transmitted.

Other apps choose to transmit much more data, meaning the agency could potentially net far more. One mobile ad platform, Millennial Media, appeared to offer particularly rich information. Millennial Media’s website states it has partnered with Rovio on a special edition of Angry Birds; with Farmville maker Zynga; with Call of Duty developer Activision, and many other major franchises.

Rovio, the maker of Angry Birds, said it had no knowledge of any NSA or GCHQ programs looking to extract data from its apps users.

“Rovio doesn’t have any previous knowledge of this matter, and have not been aware of such activity in 3rd party advertising networks,” said Saara Bergström, Rovio’s VP of marketing and communications. “Nor do we have any involvement with the organizations you mentioned [NSA and GCHQ].”

Millennial Media did not respond to a request for comment.

In December, the Washington Post reported on how the NSA could make use of advertising tracking files generated through normal internet browsing – known as cookies – from Google and others to get information on potential targets.

However, the richer personal data available to many apps, coupled with real-time geolocation, and the uniquely identifying handset information many apps transmit give the agencies a far richer data source than conventional web-tracking cookies.

Almost every major website uses cookies to serve targeted advertising and content, as well as streamline the experience for the user, for example by managing logins. One GCHQ document from 2010 notes that cookie data – which generally qualifies as metadata – has become just as important to the spies. In fact, the agencies were sweeping it up in such high volumes that their were struggling to store it.

“They are gathered in bulk, and are currently our single largest type of events,” the document stated.

The ability to obtain targeted intelligence by hacking individual handsets has been well documented, both through several years of hacker conferences and previous NSA disclosures in Der Spiegel, and both the NSA and GCHQ have extensive tools ready to deploy against iPhone, Android and other phone platforms.

GCHQ’s targeted tools against individual smartphones are named after characters in the TV series The Smurfs. An ability to make the phone’s microphone ‘hot’, to listen in to conversations, is named “Nosey Smurf”. High-precision geolocation is called “Tracker Smurf”, power management – an ability to stealthily activate an a phone that is apparently turned off – is “Dreamy Smurf”, while the spyware’s self-hiding capabilities are codenamed “Paranoid Smurf”.

Those capability names are set out in a much broader 2010 presentation that sheds light on spy agencies’ aspirations for mobile phone interception, and that less-documented mass-collection abilities.

The cover sheet of the document sets out the team’s aspirations:

mobile theme 1
The cover slide for a May 2010 GCHQ presentation on mobile phone data interception. Photograph: Guardian

Another slide details weak spots in where data flows from mobile phone network providers to the wider internet, where the agency attempts to intercept communications. These are locations either within a particular network, or international roaming exchanges (known as GRXs), where data from travellers roaming outside their home country is routed.

mobile briefing 2
While GCHQ uses Android apps for most of its examples, it suggests much of the same data could be taken from iPhone apps. Photograph: Guardian
mobile briefing 3
GCHQ’s targeted tools against individual smartphones are named after characters in the TV series The Smurfs. Photograph: Guardian

These are particularly useful to the agency as data is often only weakly encrypted on such networks, and includes extra information such as handset ID or mobile number – much stronger target identifiers than usual IP addresses or similar information left behind when PCs and laptops browse the internet.

The NSA said its phone interception techniques are only used against valid targets, and are subject to stringent legal safeguards.

“The communications of people who are not valid foreign intelligence targets are not of interest to the National Security Agency,” said a spokeswoman in a statement.

“Any implication that NSA’s foreign intelligence collection is focused on the smartphone or social media communications of everyday Americans is not true. Moreover, NSA does not profile everyday Americans as it carries out its foreign intelligence mission. We collect only those communications that we are authorized by law to collect for valid foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes – regardless of the technical means used by the targets.

“Because some data of US persons may at times be incidentally collected in NSA’s lawful foreign intelligence mission, privacy protections for US persons exist across the entire process concerning the use, handling, retention, and dissemination of data. In addition, NSA actively works to remove extraneous data, to include that of innocent foreign citizens, as early as possible in the process.

“Continuous and selective publication of specific techniques and tools lawfully used by NSA to pursue legitimate foreign intelligence targets is detrimental to the security of the United States and our allies – and places at risk those we are sworn to protect.”

The NSA declined to respond to a series of queries on how routinely capabilities against apps were deployed, or on the specific minimisation procedures used to prevent US citizens’ information being stored through such measures.

GCHQ declined to comment on any of its specific programs, but stressed all of its activities were proportional and complied with UK law.

“It is a longstanding policy that we do not comment on intelligence matters,” said a spokesman.

“Furthermore, all of GCHQ’s work is carried out in accordance with a strict legal and policy framework that ensures that our activities are authorised, necessary and proportionate, and that there is rigorous oversight, including from the Secretary of State, the Interception and Intelligence Services Commissioners and the Parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee. All our operational processes rigorously support this position.”

 

• A separate disclosure on Wednesday, published by Glenn Greenwald and NBC News, gave examples of how GCHQ was making use of its cable-tapping capabilities to monitor YouTube and social media traffic in real-time.

GCHQ’s cable-tapping and internet buffering capabilities , codenamed Tempora, were disclosed by the Guardian in June, but the new documents published by NBC from a GCHQ presentation titled “Psychology: A New Kind of SIGDEV” set out a program codenamed Squeaky Dolphin which gave the British spies “broad real-time monitoring” of “YouTube Video Views”, “URLs ‘Liked’ on Facebook” and “Blogspot/Blogger Visits”.

A further slide noted that “passive” – a term for large-scale surveillance through cable intercepts – give the agency “scalability”.

The means of interception mean GCHQ and NSA could obtain data without any knowledge or co-operation from the technology companies. Spokespeople for the NSA and GCHQ told NBC all programs were carried out in accordance with US and UK law.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/27/nsa-gchq-smartphone-app-angry-birds-personal-data

Your Phone Apps Can Give Up Personal Data To Spy Agencies

January 27, 2014

When a smartphone user opens Angry Birds, the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spies may be lurking in the background to snatch data revealing the player’s location, age, sex and other personal information, according to secret British intelligence documents.

By , JEFF LARSON and

In their globe-spanning surveillance for terrorism suspects and other targets, the National Security Agency and its British counterpart have been trying to exploit a basic byproduct of modern telecommunications: With each new generation of mobile phone technology, ever greater amounts of personal data pour onto networks where spies can pick it up.

According to dozens of previously undisclosed classified documents, among the most valuable of those unintended intelligence tools are so-called leaky apps that spew everything from users’ smartphone identification codes to where they have been that day.

The N.S.A. and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters were working together on how to collect and store data from dozens of smartphone apps by 2007, according to the documents, provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor. Since then, the agencies have traded recipes for grabbing location and planning data when a target uses Google Maps, and for vacuuming up address books, buddy lists, phone logs and the geographic data embedded in photos when someone sends a post to the mobile versions of Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, Twitter and other services.

The eavesdroppers’ pursuit of mobile networks has been outlined in earlier reports, but the secret documents, shared by The New York Times, The Guardian and ProPublica, offer far more details of their ambitions for smartphones and the apps that run on them. The efforts were part of an initiative called “the mobile surge,” according to a 2011 British document, an analogy to the troop surges in Iraq and Afghanistan. One N.S.A. analyst’s enthusiasm was evident in the breathless title — “Golden Nugget!” — given to one slide for a top-secret 2010 talk describing iPhones and Android phones as rich resources, one document notes.

The scale and the specifics of the data haul are not clear. The documents show that the N.S.A. and the British agency routinely obtain information from certain apps, particularly some of those introduced earliest to cellphones. With some newer apps, including Angry Birds, the agencies have a similar capability, the documents show, but they do not make explicit whether the spies have put that into practice. Some personal data, developed in profiles by advertising companies, could be particularly sensitive: A secret 2012 British intelligence document says that spies can scrub smartphone apps that contain details like a user’s “political alignment” and sexual orientation.

President Obama announced new restrictions this month to better protect the privacy of ordinary Americans and foreigners from government surveillance, including limits on how the N.S.A. can view “metadata” of Americans’ phone calls — the routing information, time stamps and other data associated with calls. But he did not address the avalanche of information that the intelligence agencies get from leaky apps and other smartphone functions.

And while he expressed concern about advertising companies that collect information on people to send tailored ads to their mobile phones, he offered no hint that American spies routinely seize that data. Nothing in the secret reports indicates that the companies cooperate with the spy agencies to share the information; the topic is not addressed.

The agencies have long been intercepting earlier generations of cellphone traffic like text messages and metadata from nearly every segment of the mobile network — and, more recently, computer traffic running on Internet pipelines. Because those same networks carry the rush of data from leaky apps, the agencies have a ready-made way to collect and store this new resource. The documents do not address how many users might be affected, whether they include Americans, or how often, with so much information collected automatically, analysts would see personal data.

“N.S.A. does not profile everyday Americans as it carries out its foreign intelligence mission,” the agency said in a written response to questions about the program. “Because some data of U.S. persons may at times be incidentally collected in N.S.A.’s lawful foreign intelligence mission, privacy protections for U.S. persons exist across the entire process.” Similar protections, the agency said, are in place for “innocent foreign citizens.”

The British spy agency declined to comment on any specific program, but said all its activities complied with British law.

Two top-secret flow charts produced by the British agency in 2012 show incoming streams of information skimmed from smartphone traffic by the Americans and the British. The streams are divided into “traditional telephony” — metadata — and others marked “social apps,” “geo apps,” “http linking,” webmail, MMS and traffic associated with mobile ads, among others. (MMS refers to the mobile system for sending pictures and other multimedia, and http is the protocol for linking to websites.)

In charts showing how information flows from smartphones into the agency’s computers, analysts included questions to be answered by the data, including “Where was my target when they did this?” and “Where is my target going?”

As the program accelerated, the N.S.A. nearly quadrupled its budget in a single year, to $767 million in 2007 from $204 million, according to a top-secret Canadian analysis written around the same time.

Even sophisticated users are often unaware of how smartphones offer a unique opportunity for one-stop shopping for information about them. “By having these devices in our pockets and using them more and more,” said Philippe Langlois, who has studied the vulnerabilities of mobile phone networks and is the founder of the Paris-based company Priority One Security, “you’re somehow becoming a sensor for the world intelligence community.”

Detailed Profiles

Smartphones almost seem to make things too easy. Functioning as phones — making calls and sending texts — and as computers — surfing the web and sending emails — they generate and also rely on data. One secret report shows that just by updating Android software, a user sent more than 500 lines of data about the phone’s history and use onto the network.

Such information helps mobile ad companies, for example, create detailed profiles of people based on how they use their mobile device, where they travel, what apps and websites they open, and other factors. Advertising firms might triangulate web shopping data and browsing history to guess whether someone is wealthy or has children, for example.

The N.S.A. and the British agency busily scoop up this data, mining it for new information and comparing it with their lists of intelligence targets.

One secret 2010 British document suggests that the agencies collect such a huge volume of “cookies” — the digital traces left on a mobile device or a computer when a target visits a website — that classified computers were having trouble storing it all.

“They are gathered in bulk, and are currently our single largest type of events,” the document says.

The two agencies displayed a particular interest in Google Maps, which is accurate to within a few yards or better in some locations. Intelligence agencies collect so much data from the app that “you’ll be able to clone Google’s database” of global searches for directions, according to a top-secret N.S.A. report from 2007.

“It effectively means that anyone using Google Maps on a smartphone is working in support of a G.C.H.Q. system,” a secret 2008 report by the British agency says.

(In December, The Washington Post, citing the Snowden documents, reported that the N.S.A. was using metadata to track cellphone locations outside the United States and was using ad cookies to connect Internet addresses with physical locations.)

In another example, a secret 20-page British report dated 2012 includes the computer code needed for plucking the profiles generated when Android users play Angry Birds. The app was created by Rovio Entertainment, of Finland, and has been downloaded more than a billion times, the company has said.

Rovio drew public criticism in 2012 when researchers claimed that the app was tracking users’ locations and gathering other data and passing it to mobile ad companies. In a statement on its website, Rovio says that it may collect its users’ personal data, but that it abides by some restrictions. For example, the statement says, “Rovio does not knowingly collect personal information from children under 13 years of age.”

The secret report noted that the profiles vary depending on which of the ad companies — which include Burstly and Google’s ad services, two of the largest online advertising businesses — compiles them. Most profiles contain a string of characters that identifies the phone, along with basic data on the user like age, sex and location. One profile notes whether the user is currently listening to music or making a call, and another has an entry for household income.

Google declined to comment for this article, and Burstly did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Saara Bergstrom, a Rovio spokeswoman, said that the company had no knowledge of the intelligence programs. “Nor do we have any involvement with the organizations you mentioned,” Ms. Bergstrom said, referring to the N.S.A. and the British spy agency.

Another ad company creates far more intrusive profiles that the agencies can retrieve, the report says. The apps that generate those profiles are not identified, but the company is named as Millennial Media, which has its headquarters in Baltimore.

In securities filings, Millennial documented how it began working with Rovio in 2011 to embed ad services in Angry Birds apps running on iPhones, Android phones and other devices.

According to the report, the Millennial profiles contain much of the same information as the others, but several categories listed as “optional,” including ethnicity, marital status and sexual orientation, suggest that much wider sweeps of personal data may take place.

Millennial Media declined to comment for this article.

Possible categories for marital status, the secret report says, include single, married, divorced, engaged and “swinger”; those for sexual orientation are straight, gay, bisexual and “not sure.” It is unclear whether the “not sure” category exists because so many phone apps are used by children, or because insufficient data may be available.

There is no explanation of precisely how the ad company defined the categories, whether users volunteered the information, or whether the company inferred it by other means. Nor is there any discussion of why all that information would be useful for marketing — or intelligence.

Unwieldy Heaps

The agencies have had occasional success — at least by their own reckoning — when they start with something closer to a traditional investigative tip or lead. The spies say that tracking smartphone traffic helped break up a bomb plot by Al Qaeda in Germany in 2007, and the N.S.A. bragged that to crack the plot, it wove together mobile data with emails, log-ins and web traffic. Similarly, mining smartphone data helped lead to arrests of members of a drug cartel hit squad for the 2010 murder of an employee of an American Consulate in Mexico.

But the data, whose volume is soaring as mobile devices have begun to dominate the technological landscape, is a crushing amount of information for the spies to sift through. As smartphone data builds up in N.S.A. and British databases, the agencies sometimes seem a bit at a loss on what to do with it all, the documents show. A few isolated experiments provide hints as to how unwieldy it can be.

In 2009, the American and British spy agencies each undertook a brute-force analysis of a tiny sliver of their cellphone databases. Crunching just one month of N.S.A. cellphone data, a secret report said, required 120 computers and turned up 8,615,650 “actors” — apparently callers of interest. A similar run using three months of British data came up with 24,760,289 actors.

“Not necessarily straightforward,” the report said of the analysis. The agencies’ extensive computer operations had trouble sorting through the slice of data. Analysts were “dealing with immaturity,” the report said, encountering computer memory and processing problems. The report made no mention of anything suspicious in the enormous lumps of data.

The Snowden affair’s most insidious consequence: “Significantly damaged the trust between the private sector and government.”

January 6, 2014

There is more than a little hypocrisy to the outcry that the government, through the National Security Agency (NSA), is systematically destroying Americans’ right to privacy. Edward Snowden’s revelations have been stripped of their social, technological and historical context. Unless you’ve camped in the Alaskan wilderness for two decades, you know — or should — that millions upon millions of Americans have consciously and, probably in most cases, eagerly surrendered much of their privacy by embracing the Internet and social media.

People do not open Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram accounts because they wish to shroud their lives in secrecy. They do not use online dating services or post videos on YouTube because they cherish their anonymity. The Internet is a vehicle for self-promotion, personal advertising and the pursuit of celebrity.

Robert J. Samuelson

The Pew Research Center’s surveys confirm that these behaviors are now entirely mainstream. In 2013, 85 percent of Americans used the Internet. Of these, almost three-quarters (73 percent) belonged to social media sites (the biggest: Facebook). Almost one-fifth of adult Internet users have posted personal videos, many hoping, says Pew, that “their creations go viral.” Among people “single and looking” for mates, nearly two-fifths (38 percent) used online dating.If Americans think their privacy is dangerously diminished, there are remedies. They can turn off their PCs, toss their smartphones and smash their tablets. Somehow, this seems unlikely, even though another Pew survey finds that “86 percent of adult Internet users have taken steps . . . to avoid surveillance by other people or organizations.”
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To these conscious sacrifices of privacy must be added murkier, collateral losses that are orchestrated by the world’s Googles, Facebooks, service providers and “data brokers,” writes Alice Marwick of Fordham University in the New York Review of Books. They scan users’ digital decisions (sites visited, products and services purchased, habits and hobbies favored) to create databases, often merged with other socio-economic information. These target advertising, improve political appeals — President Obama’s campaign excelled at this — and influence hiring decisions, as Don Peck notes in the Atlantic.
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The NSA’s damage to privacy is dwarfed by the impact of market activity. The sensationalism surrounding Snowden’s revelations obscures this. Case in point: The disclosure that U.S. telephone calls are open to NSA monitoring. Suddenly, Big Brother looms. In our mind’s eye, we see the NSA’s computers scouring our every phone call. We’re exposed to constant snooping and the possibility that the government will misuse the information it finds.The reality is far more limited. The NSA is governed by legal restrictions. It does not examine the full database. It searches individual numbers only after it has determined there’s a “reasonable, articulable suspicion” that a number might be linked to terrorist groups. In 2012, there were 288 of these findings. After one is made, the NSA can retrieve three items about the number: the dates of calls made and received for five years; the other phones’ numbers; and the calls’ length. The NSA is not entitled to listen to conversations, but it can order similar searches on the other numbers involved.
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Thousands of calls are caught in the dragnet, but the total is puny compared with the untold billions of annual calls.Whether these searches are effective in fighting terrorism is disputed. The NSA says they’re valuable. A panel of experts appointed by Obama concluded that the monitoring “was not essential to preventing attacks.” But more important for civil liberties and privacy, the panel found that present practices don’t approach past abuses. During the Vietnam War, the panel noted, the CIA investigated 300,000 anti-war critics. The government also sought to “expose, disrupt, and neutralize their efforts to affect public opinion.”By all means, let’s debate the NSA. Some policies seem suspect, spying on the heads of friendly governments topping the list. It’s also important to recognize that government can coerce and punish in ways that private markets cannot. The potential for abuse is greater. But let’s also keep the debate in perspective.In a digitized world, spying must be digitized. Then there’s cyberwarfare. Our electronic systems remain vulnerable, as the recent theft of data from millions of credit and debit cards at Target demonstrates. Government and the private sector need to collaborate more closely to protect vital systems. But these “efforts are as good as dead for the foreseeable future,” says Dmitri Alperovitch of CrowdStrike, a cybersecurity firm. The NSA controversy has “significantly damaged the trust between the private sector and government.” This may be the Snowden affair’s most insidious (and overlooked) consequence.

Vilifying the NSA — letting Snowden dictate the terms of debate — promotes bad history and bad policy. It’s bad history, because the most powerful assaults on privacy have originated in markets. It’s bad policy, because weakening the NSA leaves the United States more exposed to cyberattacks.

Read more from Robert Samuelson’s archive.

The former NSA contractor prepares to deliver his televised Christmas message on Britain’s Channel 4.

This guy took the law into his own hands and broke it, violated the terms of his employment, violate his oath, and is now telling anyone who will listen how even the NSA (amaong others) seems to him. And he refuses to present himself in his home country to face the consequences — opting instead to fee first to Communist China and then to Communist Russia, two nations where there is no real “get away with it” criticism of the government without consequences or free speech.  As a Chinese or Russian citizen  his treason could have likely have resulted in execution by now.  “He intentionally did damage to the security of every loyal American citizen.” Photo: CHANNEL 4/AFP/Getty Images

This is the guy he’s blaming…..

“There was nobody [in the American government] willfully or knowingly trying to break the law.”

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By ANDREA DRUSCH | 12/15/13 9:08 PM EST

The leader of a task force responding to security leaks by Edward Snowden says the former National Security Agency employee could conceivably give America’s enemies “the keys to the kingdom.”

In an interview with CBS’s “60 Minutes,” Rick Ledgett said the information Snowden took reveals gaps in U.S. capabilities via some 31,000 files that have not yet been disclosed.

“It would give them a roadmap of what we know and what we don’t know … implicitly, a way to protect their information from the U.S. intelligence community’s view,” Ledgett said. “It is the keys to the kingdom.”

Snowden, who fled the United States earlier this year after leaking files to journalist Glenn Greenwald, remains in exile in Russia.

(WATCH: Boehner says Edward Snowden is a ‘traitor’)

Ledgett, a 25-year veteran of the agency tasked with conducting an investigation of Snowden, said he visited Hawaii to probe the leaker’s home and personal life. He learned about unusual work habits, such as the fact that Snowden worked at the computer with a hood covering the screen so his girlfriend couldn’t see what he was doing. He also found that Snowden had stolen information to cheat on a test to get work at the agency in the first place.

Among the chief concerns after Snowden fled was that he could have a left a bug on any of the computers he worked on, functioning like a time bomb, Ledgett said.

“All the machines that he had access to, we removed from our classified network,” he said. “All the machines in the unclassified network, and including the actual cables that connect those machines, we removed as well.”

Doing so cost the agency tens of millions of dollars, he said.

Asked whether he thought it was possible to negotiate a deal with Snowden to return to the United States, Ledgett said his personal view was that it was “worth having a conversation about,” but that it was not a unanimous opinion. NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander rejected such a plan, comparing Snowden to a hostage situation.

Pressed on the FISA court’s assertions that the NSA had abused its powers, Alexander said no one had done so intentionally.

“There was nobody willfully or knowingly trying to break the law,” Alexander said.

Includes video:
Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/12/edward-snowden-nsa-leak-101183.html#ixzz2pc0A6Mkg

Michael Hayden during his time as the head of the CIA

Michael Hayden, former head of NSA and CIA, has become a leading media defender of government eavesdropping — and a critic of Mr. Snowden. Photograph: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images
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Michael Hayden, who served as NSA director and CIA director under the last administration, called the suggestion of clemency for Snowden “outrageous.”
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Former CIA Director James Woolsey said the NSA leaker should be “hanged” if he’s ever tried and convicted of treason.“I think giving him amnesty is idiotic,” Woolsey said. “He should be prosecuted for treason. If convicted by a jury of his peers, he should be hanged by his neck until he is dead.”Former U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Hugh Shelton called the prospect of giving Snowden amnesty a “grave error.”

“Stop spying on people!” — Syrian Electronic Army’s cyber-attacks compromising Skype’s Twitter, Facebook accounts

January 2, 2014

Image from beta.syriadeeply.org

Image from beta.syriadeeply.org

 
 

Syrian computer hacker conglomerate, the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA), has kicked off the New Year with a number of cyber-attacks, compromising Skype’s Twitter, Facebook accounts, and its official blog.

Social media accounts belonging to Skype, Microsoft’s  voice-over-IP service, were hacked around 19:30 GMT. SEA posted  on Skype’s Twitter account a rogue message saying “Stop  spying on people! via Syrian Electronic Army.” The hacker  group also urged people not to use Microsoft accounts because the  company is “selling the data to the governments.”

SEA later re-tweeted the message using its own twitter page.

 

A similar message was posted on Skype’s Facebook page, but was  quickly deleted, according to TheNextWeb. The link to it, which  the SEA posted on its Twitter account, leads to a removed page.

Screenshot from facebook.comScreenshot from facebook.com

 

Attacks were also generated on Skype’s official blog with posts  calling on the US to stop its global spying activity.

SEA continued to attack Microsoft via its twitter account  posting, “You can thank Microsoft for monitoring your  accounts/emails using these details.”

 

Since SEA’s inception in 2011, the organization has denied any  association with the Syrian government. They claim to be  self-motivated patriotic supporters of the government, but are  not acting on its behalf.

In 2013, SEA claimed responsibility for hacking a number of  Western media outlets including the New York Times, The  Washington Post, The Huffington Post and Thomson Reuters.  Arguably, their biggest success was the penetration of the  Associated Press twitter account that posted President Barack  Obama had been injured in a White House attack.

Skype has now fully regained control and deleted the false tweets  from the compromised social media channels. Its blog is being  automatically redirected to Skype’s homepage.

“We recently became aware of a targeted cyber-attack that led  to access to Skype’s social media properties, but these  credentials were quickly reset. No user information was  compromised,” a Skype spokesman responded to TheNextWeb  query.

Skype also tweeted that no accounts of its other users had been  compromised.

 

The latest attacks by the SEA follow Edward Snowden’s revelations  of NSA eavesdrop outreach, including Microsoft.
In November Microsoft and its Skype division were cleared of data  protection violations relating to the NSA scandal by the  Luxembourg data protection regulator, CNPD.

The probe into Microsoft’s collaboration on data sharing with the  NSA found that the transfer of some data to affiliate companies  in the US appears “to take place lawfully” under a  so-called Safe Harbor agreement.

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Last November,

The hacktivist pro-Assad group known as the “Syrian Electronic Army” (SEA) briefly hijacked the Twitter feeds of TIME magazine in response to a critical description of President Assad’s candidacy for its ‘Person of the year’ award.

The SEA has tweeted from TIME’s official account: “Syrian  Electronic Army was here via @Official_SEA16. Next time write a  better word about the Syrian president #SEA”.
That tweet was soon deleted.

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The group referred to TIME’s list of people – politicians and  celebrities – selected as potential winners for “Person of the  Year,” the magazine’s annual award.

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Syrian President Bashar Assad is one of the candidates, while the  magazine describes him as: “Syria’s ruler presided over a bloody  year, shrugging off international concerns over the use of  chemical weapons as the death toll of his country’s civil war  eclipsed 100,000.”

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The voting closes on December, 4, with TIME’s Person of the Year  to be announced on December 11.

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The SEA also claimed interfering with the vote on the US  magazine’s webpage.


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