Can Philippine President Duterte Hold Ebbing Investor Confidence Or Will He Seriously Harm His Nation? — Talk Is All About Human Rights, Murder, Duterte, Impeachment, Coup — All The Wrong Things

Duterte has undermined a key source of comfort for foreign investors in the Philippines: Stability

The Philippines was the second fastest growing economy in Asia

CNBC.com

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte ratcheted up his feud with the U.S. on September 12, ordering all U.S. special forces out of the southern Philippines where they have been advising local troops battling Muslim extremists.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte ratcheted up his feud with the U.S. on September 12, ordering all U.S. special forces out of the southern Philippines where they have been advising local troops battling Muslim extremists. Here President Duterte explains American wrongdoing in the Philippines in the early-1900s. Ted Aljibe | AFP | Getty Images
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The honeymoon period of Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte appears to be over.

Foreign investors are pulling money out of the country’s stock market rapidly, riled by a series of remarks made by the acid-tongued Duterte against key ally U.S. and China that have cast doubts over the future of the country’s foreign policies as well as his handling of the economy.

Official data from the Philippine stock exchange showed the net foreign transactions on the benchmark Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE) index fell every week between August 15 and September 16.

The Philippine peso dropped 3.37 per cent against the dollar during this period, while the benchmark index has been the worst performer in the region over a one-month period.

The PSE index fell 4.48 percent, compared to a 2.99 percent drop in Thailand’s SET and a 1.74 percent decline in the Jakarta composite index.

“The President’s statements have been very volatile these past few days, and it’s starting to be a concern,” Lexter Azurin, research head at Manila-based Unicapital Securities, told CNBC by email.

The former mayor of Davao city made headlines after threatening China with a ‘bloody’ confrontation over the South China Sea dispute; he antagonized the U.S. by publicly insulting President Barack Obama calling for the withdrawal of special forces troops from southern Philippines and by suggesting he was considering acquiring defense equipment from Russia and China.

The constant flip-flops have undermined a key source of comfort for foreign investors in the Philippines: Stability.

Many observers had expected the new regime to continue with policies that have ensured the Philippines has clocked some of the fastest growth rates in the world.

Now there are worries that the president’s erratic outbursts may end up distracting from the task at hand.

French investment bank Natixis’ senior economist, Trinh Nguyen, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” last week the “off-the-cuff” remarks about the U.S. were significant because the Philippines had “traditionally been a very strategic ally of the U.S.”

In the country’s territorial dispute with China in the South China Sea, the U.S. had been a vocal backer of the Philippines.

“They just recently had an agreement with the military for weapons sharing … [and now] the military is trying to put out the damage [caused by] the comments,” she said.

But there are some upsides to Duterte’s policy stance, according to analysts.

Nomura’s Asia equity strategists reckoned Duterte’s recent outreach to China could prove to be a smart move if a Trump presidency becomes apparent.

Trump previously referred to the Philippines as one of the “terrorist nations” while taking a swipe at immigrants at an August rally, according to Reuters.

The Nomura strategists reiterated their neutral position in the Philippines in a recent note, citing a reassessment after the start of the U.S. presidential debates.

Economic fundamentals in the Philippines appeared strong, with healthy domestic consumption offsetting headwinds from overseas.

Duterte FDI

Duterte, strong dollar weighing on the Philippine peso: Economist  Tuesday, 13 Sep 2016 | 9:46 PM ET | 02:00

According to Azurin, private consumption accounts for 70 percent of the total economy and a robust growth in business process outsourcing sector would likely add to the country’s growth story in the next few years.

Azurin added that Duterte’s proposed tax reforms, part of his 10-point economic plan announced in June, could lead to higher domestic consumption.

In the April-June quarter, the Philippines was the second fastest growing economy in Asia, registering a 7.0 percent annual expansion, a touch lower than India‘s 7.1 percent but faster than China‘s 6.7 percent growth in the same period.

Natixis’ Nguyen agreed that many of Duterte’s proposed policies, such as liberalizing foreign direct investments and increasing infrastructure investment, should theoretically be positive news for investors – but Duterte’s remarks were overshadowing them.

“President Duterte’s 10-point economic agenda is spot-on in terms of intent. Still, action on this economic agenda is so far lacking,” the Nomura strategists added.

In recent months, Duterte’s focus had been fixed on his government’s war on drugs, where scores of Filipinos have died, earning him criticism from international bodies over possible human rights abuse.

“It seems that the current administration has lost its focus on prioritizing economic programs, and leaning towards more on solving the drug problem in the country,” said Azurin.

Duterte has also gone after some of the country’s miners for failing to follow environmental regulations as well as after online gambling.

Making things harder for investors was the fact that the Philippine market was relatively more expensive than its regional peers, which Azurin said meant foreign investors were “looking for more catalysts” to justify current valuations and continue trading in the market.

Moreover, if the U.S. Federal Reserve were to raise interest rates either on Wednesday or in December, it would likely result in capital outflow from emerging markets, including the Philippines, back into developed markets.

Nguyen said the Philippines can fund itself in the face of outflows, but it remains to be seen if the country would be able to create the jobs it needs to sustain the livelihood of its people and ensure consumption stays buoyant.

“That would come from domestic firms, but it also needs foreign direct investment and is not going to be able to realize its beneficial demographic dividend if the right policy is not in place,” said Nguyen.

— Follow CNBC International on Twitter and Facebook.

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/09/19/duterte-news-philippine-presidents-intemperate-remarks-shaking-foreign-investor-confidence-in-the-country.html

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Zubiri: If you want to ‘expose’ Duterte, file impeachment case (See Note At Bottom)

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LET US AVOID USING THE SENATE FOR GRANDSTANDING, URGES SENATOR

By: Maila Ager
@MAgerINQ
INQUIRER.net
02:51 PM September 20th, 2016

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Former Bukidnon Rep. Juan Miguel  Zubiri. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

Senator Juan Miguel Zubiri. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

If there are issues against President Rodrigo Duterte, then the proper recourse is to file an impeachment case against him, Senator Juan Miguel Zubiri  said on Tuesday.

Zubiri was one of the 16 senators who voted to remove Senator Leila de Lima as chair of the Senate committee on justice and human rights, which is investigating the alleged extrajudicial killings in the country.

READ: De Lima ousted as Senate justice committee chair
“If some persons want to expose certain issues about the President, their proper recourse is to impeach him. File an impeachment case,” he said in a statement.

“If they have an axe to grind against President Duterte, they should file a case against him instead of transforming Senate inquiries into political circus,” the senator said.

Zubiri said the Senate should not be used for grandstanding.

He said he voted in favor of declaring De Lima’s position as chair of the committee vacant because the people need “impartial chairmen who conduct public hearings efficiently and fairly.”

“I am disappointed at seeing the Senate investigations being used to push other people’s political agenda. In my five years as a civilian, I watched how Senate proceedings often descended into grandstanding and become tools for demolition jobs,” he said.

“As legislators, we should be productive and proactive rather than destructive. People demand results from the hearings and inquiries like developmental laws. Right now, we are hearing the national budget which by itself demands our close attention.”

Zubiri said their offices should be used to deliver the change that the administration promised to happen in the first year of the new administration.

Instead of focusing on “narrow ambitions,” he said, they should address the problems of traffic, poverty eradication, jobs generation, improving education, and stopping the spread of illegal drugs and criminality.

“Let us avoid using the Senate for grandstanding,” Zubiri said.

“I respect the power and prerogative of the Senate to investigate, but, once someone’s political agenda is involved, the whole process is derailed and public interest is forgotten,” the senator added. JE/rga

Disclaimer: Comments do not represent the views of INQUIRER.net. We reserve the right to exclude comments which are inconsistent with our editorial standards. FULL DISCLAIMER

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The “Full Disclaimer” by the Philippine Inquirer indicates to Peace and Freedom that the Free Press in the Philippines is growing fearful. Journalists inside the Philippines have confirmed to us that the free exchange of ideas in the Philippines is no longer free. Editors, and journalists are afraid to state their positions in a nation with leaders that have unleashed vigilantes and extrajudicial murderers — many wearing police and perhaps army uniforms . This is how democracies destroy themselves. Add to that lawmakers that are lecturing their opposition on how to go about the removal of the President.  “Senate proceedings often descended into grandstanding and become tools for demolition jobs.”

In the Philippines, there still may be time for thoughtful adults to stop what looks like an impending national disaster. The cautionary words from the EU, UN, and Human Rights Watch may need to be assessed and reacted to more carefully. By ignoring human rights entirely, the Philippines seems intent upon murdering its way to a better world — something tried by the likes of Adolph Hitler, Joseph Stalin and others before.

All ended up unsuccessful — and dead. But not before their nations were ruined.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte discussing American atrocities in the Philippines in the early-1900s. Photo: Getty Images

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Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/817159/zubiri-if-you-want-to-expose-duterte-file-impeachment-case#ixzz4KmTGfK00
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Related:

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte

 

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One Response to “Can Philippine President Duterte Hold Ebbing Investor Confidence Or Will He Seriously Harm His Nation? — Talk Is All About Human Rights, Murder, Duterte, Impeachment, Coup — All The Wrong Things”

  1. daveyone1 Says:

    Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

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