Torture Is China’s Useful Tool in High Confession Rate

Police say fraud probe has been made difficult because some suspects were returned to island

Staff Reporter
South China Morning Post

Monday, 16 May 16, 2016, 3:00am
 Image may contain: 1 person, standing

Thirty-two people from Taiwan who were controversially deported from Malaysia to the mainland over allegations of fraud have confessed, the public security ministry said on Sunday.

The Taiwanese and 65 other suspects who were deported on April 30 belonged to five criminal syndicates, the ministry said.

The news came as mainland police and a delegation of judicial officials from Taiwan wrapped up a three-day meeting in Zhuhai, where the suspects are being held at two detention centres.

Mainland police agreed yesterday to arrange for family members to visit the suspects.

Taiwan and Beijing have engaged in a war of words over the deportation of the suspects from Malaysia.

Beijing says the suspects are wanted for crimes committed against mainlanders and so should be deported to the mainland rather than Taiwan, while politicians in Taiwan say the move is a means of pressuring the island ahead of the inauguration of president-elect Tsai Ing-wen.

Tsai, from the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party, won a landslide victory in elections in January.

I just hope those crooks will be punished so no more people will be cheated
MAINLAND CHINESE SCAM VICTIM

Mainland police said they had collected evidence against four of the criminal syndicates, but the investigation into the fifth was encountering difficulties because most of its suspected members had been sent back to Taiwan.

Twenty Taiwanese suspects deported to the island rather than the mainland were temporarily released by local police on April 16 due to a lack of evidence.

Five days later, 18 were detained again and two banned from travelling.

“The money of mainland victims is now in Taiwan. We hope the Taiwan side can actively pursue the money so we can return it to the victims,” Chen Shiqu, a senior police officer at the public security ministry, said.

Some of the scam victims were in Zhuhai to petition the Taiwanese delegation to cooperate.

Guo, 72, from Beijing, said she was cheated out of 2 million yuan (HK$2.38 million) in August and September 2015 and could no longer afford cancer treatment.

“I just hope those crooks will be punished so no more people will be cheated,” she said.

Luo, 38, from Hunan province, said that in March she was cheated out of 120,000 yuan – 60 times her monthly earnings. “I hope Taiwanese authorities can understand the pain I suffer and work with mainland police to recover our loss,” Luo said.

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/1945533/taiwanese-telecom-fraud-suspects-deported-mainland

Chinese telecom fraud suspects are escorted off an aircraft by the police at Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport in Guangzhou, capital of south China’s Guangdong province, April 30, 2016. [Photo/Xinhua]

Chinese telecom fraud suspects are escorted off an aircraft by the police at Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport in Guangzhou, capital of south China’s Guangdong province, April 30, 2016. [Photo/Xinhua]

Chinese telecom fraud suspects are escorted off an aircraft by the police at Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport in Guangzhou, capital of south China’s Guangdong province, April 30, 2016.[Photo/Xinhua]

Chinese telecom fraud suspects are escorted off an aircraft by the police at Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport in Guangzhou, capital of south China’s Guangdong province, April 30, 2016. [Photo/Xinhua]

http://english.gov.cn/news/top_news/2016/05/01/content_281475339270998.htm

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One Response to “Torture Is China’s Useful Tool in High Confession Rate”

  1. daveyone1 Says:

    Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

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