Chinese official demoted ‘being afraid to smoke before Muslim religious figures’ — Question of loyalty? –“Not daring to smoke conforms with extreme Islamic religious thought in Xinjiang.”

AFP

© AFP/File | A notice from the Hotan district government in China’s Xinjiang region accused a village-level secretary of being afraid to smoke before religious figures

BEIJING (AFP) – A Chinese official who allegedly declined to smoke in front of Muslims in Xinjiang has been demoted for taking an “unstable political stance,” a state-run newspaper reported Tuesday.

China’s Xinjiang government, home to China’s Muslim Uighur ethnic minority, restricts religious practises — such as growing beards, wearing headscarves, and fasting during Ramadan — that are seen as symbols of “Islamic extremism”.

A notice from the Hotan district government over the weekend accused Jelil Matniyaz, a village-level secretary for the ruling Communist party in the far-western region, of being afraid to smoke before religious figures.

“His behaviour of ‘not daring’ to smoke conforms with extreme religious thought in Xinjiang,” a local official told the Global Times newspaper.

He added that a dutiful party member would choose to smoke in front of religious believers in order to demonstrate his or her commitment to secularism.

Matniyaz’s failure to do so meant that instead of “leading the fight against extreme religious thought,” he was “failing to confront the threat of extreme regional forces”, the official said.

Matniyaz was given a “stern warning”, stripped of his party secretary duties and downgraded from senior staff member to staff member.

Xinjiang has been racked for years by a series of violent attacks which Beijing blames on exiled Uighur separatist groups whom it says are aligned with foreign terrorist networks.

Rights groups have countered that unrest in the region is largely a response to repressive policies, and that tighter measures are counterproductive.

Uighurs, a traditionally Muslim group, complain of cultural and religious repression and discrimination.

China introduced new anti-extremism legislation in Xinjiang late March, including a provision that bans “abnormal” beards.

Related:

Chinese police in Xinjiang

********************************************

Chinese troops rumble through Xinjiang city in new display

WORLD Updated: Mar 01, 2017 18:14 IST

AP
AP
Beijing
Chinese troops

Local police in one part of Xinjiang announced earlier this month that every vehicle will be tracked using satellite technology as part of an anti-terror initiative.(PTI File Photo)

China has staged a fresh display of military might in its western Xinjiang region, sending more than 10,000 armed police, columns of armored vehicles and helicopters rumbling through the regional capital.A government news website published reports and photos of Monday’s exercise in the city of Urumqi, where the region’s recently installed Communist Party secretary exhorted soldiers to “bury the corpses of terrorists” in a new people’s war.Xinjiang, home to the predominantly Muslim Uighur ethnic minority, has seen hundreds killed in recent years in attacks. Beijing has blamed the violence on Islamic militants and separatists and officials in recent weeks have ratcheted up public demonstrations and tightened security.

Local police in one part of Xinjiang announced earlier this month that every vehicle will be tracked using satellite technology as part of an anti-terror initiative.

Activists say repressive government policies have exacerbated tensions and radicalised local youth.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/chinese-troops-rumble-through-xinjiang-city-in-new-display/story-MIUXp4iSIbpWsW5jPV4i3O.html

Related:

 (Anyone who criticizes the Chinese government on WeChat is likely to be given special attention)

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses to “Chinese official demoted ‘being afraid to smoke before Muslim religious figures’ — Question of loyalty? –“Not daring to smoke conforms with extreme Islamic religious thought in Xinjiang.””

  1. Brittius Says:

    Reblogged this on Brittius.

  2. daveyone1 Says:

    Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: