Posts Tagged ‘ADIZ’

China expands its control in South China Sea

September 17, 2018

As China consolidates its hold in South China Sea and wields its military, economic and diplomatic leverage, smaller countries see no credible option but to work with Beijing, even if that means furthering Chinese objectives. Manila, for example, seems willing to accede to Beijing’s demand for joint development of hydrocarbon resources in the Philippines’ own exclusive economic zone.

The plain fact is that U.S. inaction under successive administrations has allowed China to gain effective control over a strategic sea that is more than twice the size of the Gulf of Mexico and 50 percent bigger than the Mediterranean Sea. Australia’s Kevin Rudd, who is still fending off accusations that he was “a slavish pro-China prime minister,” has acknowledged that “Chinese policy has not yet been challenged in the South China Sea by the United States to any significant extent.”

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The U.S., even at the risk of fostering Philippine helplessness against Chinese expansionism, has refused to clarify whether its 1951 Mutual Defense Treaty with Manila would apply to an attack on Philippine troops or vessels in the South China Sea. This refusal stands in contrast to Washington’s commitment to the defense of the Japanese-administered but Chinese-claimed Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea. U.S. President Donald Trump, in his joint statement with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in April, said that “Article 5 of the U.S.-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security covers the Senkaku Islands.”

In the South China Sea, China has astounded the world with the speed and scale of its creation of artificial islands and military infrastructure. The first Chinese dredger arrived in the region in December 2013. Less than five years later, China has largely completed building most of its forward military bases. It is now ramping up its military assets in the South China Sea.

Yet China has incurred no international costs for pushing its borders far out into international waters. In fact, China stepped up the expansion of its frontiers after an international arbitration tribunal invalidated its expansive claims in the South China Sea through a 2016 ruling in a case instituted by the Philippines.

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law. Vietnam has been unable to develop its own undersea oil due to China’s aggressive behavior.

U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis recently called out China for its “intimidation and coercion” of smaller nations in the region. His criticism of the Chinese strategy in the South China Sea followed American action to disinvite China from this summer’s Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise, known as RIMPAC.

This might suggest that the U.S. is taking a tough line. In reality, America’s response to China’s expansionism in the South China Sea has remained muted. The U.S. has focused its concern merely on safeguarding freedom of navigation through the South China Sea.

In fact, the U.S. has refused to take sides in the territorial disputes between China and the other claimant-states in the South China Sea. The Trump administration stayed silent even when Chinese military threats forced Vietnam in March, for the second time in less than nine months, to halt oil and gas drilling on its own continental shelf.

The U.S. has similarly stayed neutral on disputes elsewhere between China and its neighbors. For example, President Barack Obama publicly said that “we don’t take a position on the sovereignty of the Senkaku Islands” and advised Tokyo and Beijing to sort out their dispute peacefully. This line has not changed under Trump, despite his reassurance that the Japan-U.S. security treaty covers the Senkakus.

Growing Asian anxieties over China have helped the U.S. to return to Asia’s center-stage by strengthening old alliances, such as with Japan, South Korea and Singapore, and building new strategic partnerships with India, Vietnam and Indonesia. It has also befriended the former pariah state of Myanmar.

Yet, despite this diplomatic windfall, the U.S. has been reluctant to draw a line on Beijing’s salami-style actions to change facts on the ground.

To be sure, the Trump-led U.S. has stepped up the so-called freedom of navigation operations in the South China Sea. But these operations neither reassure the smaller states nor deter China, whose actions continue to violate the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, or UNCLOS.

In the East China Sea, China established an air-defense identification zone (ADIZ) in 2013 covering territories, like the Senkakus, that it claims but does not control. This action set a dangerous precedent in international relations.

In the South China Sea, rather than openly declare an ADIZ, China will likely seek to enforce one by gradually establishing concentric circles of air control — but only after it has deployed sufficient military assets there and further consolidated its hold.

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It has already set up an interconnected array of radar, electronic-attack facilities, missile batteries and airfields on the disputed Spratly Islands. And by turning artificial islands into military bases, it has virtually established permanent aircraft carriers whose role extends to the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific.

China’s strategy poses a serious challenge to its neighbors, which face a deepening dilemma over how to deal with its creeping aggression.

The U.S., while seeking to protect its military freedom of navigation in the South China Sea, has effectively turned a blind eye to the broader Chinese assault on the freedom of the seas, including restricting the rights of other states to natural resources on their own continental shelves.

Unless the U.S. shifts its focus from freedom of navigation to freedom of the seas, China will have its way, including forcing its smaller neighbors to share their legitimate resources with it.

The Philippines, for example, is at serious risk of wilting under Chinese pressure. Prevented by Chinese military threats from tapping energy resources in an area of seabed known as Reed Bank, which is located close the Philippine coast, Manila seems willing to enter into a deal with Beijing to equally share the output from a joint gas project there.

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China has built seven military bases near the Philippines.

Under the international arbitration ruling, the Philippines have exclusive rights to Reed Bank. But with China trashing the ruling in the absence of an international enforcement mechanism, the message to Manila is that might makes right.

Left with no other option, Manila appears ready to offer Beijing half of the gas production, but no sovereign rights. The logic behind such a prospective offer is that any Western oil giant, if it developed Reed Bank, would take about 50 percent of the output as its share. So the choice is between a Western oil company like Exxon Mobil and a Chinese state-run giant, such as the China National Offshore Oil Corp.

But such a Philippine deal would encourage China to seek similar concessions with other claimant-states, effectively blocking out Western oil firms from the South China Sea.

Make no mistake: Chinese territorial and maritime revisionism has made the South China Sea the world’s most critical hot spot. In fact, the South China Sea has become central to the wider geopolitics, balance of power and maritime order.

Brahma Chellaney is a geostrategist and the author of nine books, including the award-winning “Water: Asia’s New Battleground.”

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2018/09/17/commentary/world-commentary/china-expands-control-south-china-sea/#.W590m-hKhaQ

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Banners declaring the Philippines a province of China appeared in various parts of Metro Manila on July 12. Nobody has claimed responsibility for the apparent prank.(Contributed photo)

  (propaganda)

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Wang Yi

Image result for philippine flag, china flag

  (This is what China cares about what people think….)

(Why give away what you own?)

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South China Sea: China’s Illegal Message to Outsiders is ‘Leave immediately and keep far off’ — This is International Airspace Over International Waters

August 11, 2018

A U.S. Navy ocean surveillance aircraft recently visited the South China Sea on a routine maritime patrol in international airspace over international waters. China told the U.S. P-8 to leave — an illegal order since the claim of sovereignty by China in the South China Sea was disallowed by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague on July 12, 2016.

Image result for U.S. navy, P-8 aircraft, photos

China has ignored international law in the South China Sea, much as Russia has done in Georgia and the Ukraine (Crimea).

Are we becoming a world where nations take what they want? Is the concept of international law dead? The answers could be “yes”.

Above: CNN Video

See also:

BBC Video:

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-asia-45152525/south-china-sea-leave-immediately-and-keep-far-off

The Full CNN report:

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law. Vietnam has been unable to develop its own undersea oil due to China’s aggressive behavior.

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Above: China has built seven military bases near the Philippines in the South China Sea

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Philippines, China work on framework of joint oil hunt

http://manilastandard.net/news/top-stories/272639/philippines-china-work-on-framework-of-joint-oil-hunt.html

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Above: military intelligence planners say China may next declare an air defense identification zone (ADIZ) over the South China Sea

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Banners declaring the Philippines a province of China appeared in various parts of Metro Manila on July 12. Nobody has claimed responsibility for the apparent prank.(Contributed photo)

  (propaganda)

Image may contain: 1 person

Wang Yi

Image result for philippine flag, china flag

  (This is what China cares about what people think….)

(Why give away what you own?)

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Image may contain: ocean, sky, outdoor and water

One of the islands China built at Subi Reef — and then built a huge military base on top. This is an area china claims but that claim was not allowed by the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague in 2016

Australia charts its own South China Sea course

August 3, 2018

Canberra’s invite to Beijing to participate in upcoming Kakadu joint naval exercises is at odds with America’s hardening line on China’s maritime moves

 SYDNEY, AUGUST 2, 2018 3:05 PM (UTC+8)

Australian warship and crew take part in a naval review and maritime parade in Sydney Harbor. Photo: AFP

Australian warship and crew take part in a naval review and maritime parade in Sydney Harbor. Photo: AFP

U.S. weighs more South China Sea patrols to confront ‘new reality’ of China

June 3, 2018

The United States is considering intensified naval patrols in the South China Sea in a bid to challenge China’s growing militarization of the waterway, actions that could further raise the stakes in one of the world’s most volatile areas.

The Pentagon is weighing a more assertive program of so-called freedom-of-navigation operations close to Chinese installations on disputed reefs, two U.S. officials and Western and Asian diplomats close to discussions said.

The officials declined to say how close they were to finalizing a decision.

Such moves could involve longer patrols, ones involving larger numbers of ships or operations involving closer surveillance of Chinese facilities in the area, which now include electronic jamming equipment and advanced military radars.

trict navigation.

A map of the South China Sea showing Chinese claims and disputed islands

U.S. officials are also pushing international allies and partners to increase their own naval deployments through the vital trade route as China strengthens its military capabilities on both the Paracel and Spratly islands, the diplomats said, even if they stopped short of directly challenging Chinese holdings.

“What we have seen in the last few weeks is just the start, significantly more is being planned,” said one Western diplomat, referring to a freedom of navigation patrol late last month that used two U.S. ships for the first time.

“There is a real sense more needs to be done.”

The Pentagon does not comment on future operations but a spokesman, Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Logan, said “we will continue to work with our friends, partners, and allies to ensure a free and open Indo-Pacific”.

A more assertive Pentagon approach already appears to have started. Reuters first reported the patrol last month in which two U.S. Navy warships sailed near South China Sea islands claimed by China, even as President Donald Trump sought Chinese cooperation on North Korea.

While the operation had been planned months in advance, and similar operations have become routine, it is believed to be the first time where two U.S. warships have been used for a freedom of navigation operation in the South China Sea.

The Pentagon also withdrew an invitation for Chinese forces to join large multi-country exercises off Hawaii later in the year.

Critics have said the patrols have little impact on Chinese behavior and mask the lack of a broader strategy to deal with China’s growing dominance of the area.

“DO NOT PAY OFF”

U.S. Defence Secretary Jim Mattis warned in Singapore on Saturday that China’s militarization of the South China Sea was now a “reality” but that Beijing would face unspecified consequences.

Questioned during the Shangri-La Dialogue security conference over whether it was too late to stop China, Mattis said: “Eventually these (actions) do not pay off.”

Last month, China’s air force landed bombers on Woody Island in the disputed Paracel archipelago as part of a training exercise, triggering concern from Vietnam and the Philippines.

Satellite photographs taken on May 12 showed China appeared to have deployed truck-mounted surface-to-air missiles or anti-ship cruise missiles at Woody, while anti-ship cruise missiles and anti-air missiles were also placed on its largest bases in the Spratlys.

Speaking on the sidelines of the Singapore conference, He Lei, of the PLA’s Academy of Military Sciences, said China had every right to continue to militarize its South China Sea holdings.

“It is China’s sovereign and legal right for China to place our army and military weapons there. We see any other country that tries to make noise about this as interfering in our internal affairs,” He said.

Regional military attaches say they are now bracing for China’s next moves, which some fear could be the first deployment of jet fighters to the Spratlys or an attempt to enforce an Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ) similar to one Beijing created off its eastern coast in 2013.

Vietnamese military officers say they are particularly concerned by the prospect of an ADIZ, saying it could threaten the integrity of Vietnamese airspace.

Lieutenant General Nguyen Duc Hai, head of the Vietnamese military’s Institute of Strategic Studies, said that while Vietnam had long sought peaceful settlements to disputes, “all options are on the table from our side to safeguard our sovereignty and territory.”

“The ADIZ establishment is one option we have thought of and also have plans to deal with.”

Satellite image of Woody Island

Beijing has been turning islands into military bases. Reuters photo

Vietnam is the most active challengers to China’s sweeping claims to much of the South China Sea, with Hanoi claiming the Paracels and the Spratlys in their entirety.

Malaysia and the Philippines hold some Spratlys features while Brunei claims waters straddled by China’s so-called nine-dash line claim. Taiwan claims the same area as China.

Singapore-based security expert Tim Huxley said while increased pressure might slow China’s militarization efforts, they would be difficult to stop.

“China has created a new reality down there, and it is not going to be rolled back,” Huxley told Reuters.

“They are not doing this to poke America or their neighbors in the eye but they are almost certainly doing this to serve their long-term strategic objectives, whether that is projecting their military power or securing energy supplies.”

Reporting by Greg Torode and Idrees Ali; Additional reporting by Lee Chyen Yee; Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan

Reuters

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-asia-security-southchinasea/u-s-weighs-more-south-china-sea-patrols-to-confront-new-reality-of-china-idUSKCN1IZ03B

White House threatens Beijing with ‘consequences’ for ‘militarising South China Sea’

May 4, 2018

Beijing has evaded questions about whether it has installed the missiles on islands over the last 30 days, but the White House is adamant about ‘near-term and long-term consequences’

South China Morning Post

PUBLISHED : Friday, 04 May, 2018, 4:44am
UPDATED : Friday, 04 May, 2018, 4:44am

The White House said on Thursday it was prepared to take measures against China’s stationing of military equipment on islands in the South China Sea, as Beijing evaded questions on whether it had installed new missiles on outposts also claimed by Vietnam and the Philippines.

“We’re well aware of China’s militarisation of the South China Sea. We’ve raised concerns directly with the Chinese about this, and there will be near-term and long-term consequences,” White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders told reporters.

US network CNBC reported on Wednesday that the Chinese military installed anti-ship and air-to-air defences on the islands over the last 30 days, citing sources close to US intelligence.

If the information is verified, it could provoke renewed tensions between countries bordering the strategically vital maritime region.

At a regular briefing on Thursday, Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying neither confirmed nor denied the deployment.

“China’s peaceful construction in the Spratly archipelago, including the deployment of necessary national defence facilities, is aimed at protecting China’s sovereignty and security,” she said. “Those who don’t intend to violate [this sovereignty] have no reason to worry.”

The South China Sea issue has been brewing for years, with China, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam making competing claims in waters with vital global shipping routes and what are believed to be significant oil and natural gas deposits.

In addition to land-reclamation efforts on reefs it controls and building civilian facilities there, China also has air bases, radar and communications systems, naval facilities and defensive weaponry in place including landing strips able to accommodate military planes.

 HQ-9B long-range surface-to-air missiles are seen in this May 3 photograph. Photo: handout

The new Chinese missiles were reportedly deployed on Fiery Cross Reef, Subi Reef and Mischief Reef, according to CNBC.

They are all in the Spratly archipelago located in waters south of mainland China between Vietnam and the Philippines.

Beijing’s territorial claims, based on its own historical records, have also pitted it against the United States.

While Washington takes no position on the sovereignty claims, it has raised concerns that Beijing is “militarising” the South China Sea, leading to Thursday’s warning of “consequences”.

The US Navy itself frequently sends warships and aircraft carriers to patrol the area.

 YJ-12 anti-ship cruise missiles are seen on May 3. Photo: handout

“China has to realise that they’ve benefited from the free navigation of the sea, and the US Navy has been the guarantor of that,” Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White said.

“We will continue to do our operations.”

China’s defence ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment but has previously stressed that the islands were “part of Chinese territory” and that it was up to China alone to decide what it does there.

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2144600/white-house-threatens-beijing-consequences-militarising

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law.

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Beijing ‘installs missiles’ on South China Sea islands

May 3, 2018

Beijing Thursday reasserted its right to build “defence” facilities in the disputed South China Sea, but declined to confirm reports it had installed new missiles on artificial islands it has built in the region.

© AFP/File | China has reportedly installed missiles on Subi Reef and other outposts in the disputed Spratly Islands

AFP

The Chinese army installed anti-ship and air-to-air defences on outposts also claimed by Vietnam and the Philippines over the last 30 days, US network CNBC reported Wednesday, citing sources close to US intelligence.

If the information is verified, it could provoke renewed tensions between countries bordering the strategically vital maritime region.

At a regular briefing on Thursday, Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying neither confirmed nor denied the deployment.

“China’s peaceful construction in the Spratly archipelago, including the deployment of necessary national defence facilities, is aimed at protecting China’s sovereignty and security,” she said.

“Those who don’t intend to violate (this sovereignty) have no reason to worry,” she said.

The South China Sea issue has been brewing for years, with China, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam making competing claims in waters with vital global shipping routes and what are believed to be significant oil and natural gas deposits.

In addition to land-reclamation efforts on reefs it controls and building civilian facilities there, China also has air bases, radar and communications systems, naval facilities and defensive weaponry in place including landing strips able to accommodate military planes.

The new Chinese missiles were reportedly deployed on Fiery Cross Reef, Subi Reef and Mischief Reef, according to CNBC.

They are all in the Spratly archipelago located in waters south of mainland China between Vietnam and the Philippines.

Beijing’s territorial claims, based on its own historical records, have also pitted it against the United States.

While Washington takes no position on the sovereignty claims, it has raised concerns that Beijing is “militarising” the South China Sea.

But the US Navy itself frequently sends warships and aircraft carriers to patrol the area.

China’s defence ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment but has previously stressed that the islands were “part of Chinese territory” and that it was up to China alone to decide what it does there.

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law.

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South China Sea: China’s missile system on Philippine-claimed reefs a step closer to airspace control

May 3, 2018

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In this April 21, 2017, file photo, Chinese structures and an airstrip on the man-made Subi Reef at the Spratly group of islands in the South China Sea are seen from a Philippine Air Force C-130.

CSIS AMTI via DigitalGlobe, File

 

China’s missile system on Philippine-claimed reefs a step closer to airspace control

Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) – May 3, 2018 – 11:15am

MANILA, Philippines — Beijing has quietly moved forward to dominating airspace control over the West Philippine Sea or the South China Sea as it deploys missile systems on its “big three” islands, a report confirmed.

CNBC reported that China quietly deployed anti-ship cruise missiles and surface-to-air missiles on Fiery Cross Reef, Mischief Reef and Subi Reef in the Spratly Islands.

These three features in the Spratly Islands are also being claimed by Manila.

The missile systems were placed on China’s military outposts in the past 30 days, a source told CNBC.

The installment of the missile weapons comes after China deployed military jamming equipment on Fiery Cross Reef and Mischief Reef.

RELATED: China erects marker on Fiery Cross Reef

According to the report, the Chinese YJ-12B anti-ship cruise missile can strike surface vessels within 295 nautical miles of the artificial islands.

Meanwhile, the HQ-9B long-range surface-to-air missile has the capability to target aircraft, drones and cruise missiles within 160 nautical miles.

CNBC also reported that the missile systems were also spotted on Woody Island in the Paracel Islands.

Euan Graham, international security director at Lowy Institute, warned that Beijing may soon deploy combat aircraft in the region.

“Next come [surface-to-air missiles], then combat aircraft are only a matter of time,” Graham said on Twitter.

Graham warned that the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force may deploy jets to the Spratlys later this year.

“Ultimately, the PLA has a plan to use the Spratlys for their custom-built purpose – to extend the envelope of China’s air and seapower throughout the South China Sea. The only debatable issue there is sooner, or later,” Graham told Philstar.com in a prior interview.

Last month, China reportedly deployed transport military planes on Mischief Reef, which shows a steady pattern of escalation in the region.

Landing a transport military plane on one feature would not cross a threshold of militarization in the Spratlys but fighter jets would, RAND Senior Policy Analyst Lyle Morris earlier said on Twitter.

“Because of the dual-use nature of military transport aircraft, the move does not cross an unambiguous threshold of offensive militarization of Chinese-occupied features in the Spratlys the same way that fighter jets would, for example,” Morris told Philstar.com.

Defending its actions in the South China Sea, Beijing had claimed “natural rights” to deploy troops and weapons in the Spratlys.

“It is the natural right of a sovereign state for China to station troops and deploy necessary territory defense facilities on the relevant islands and reefs of the Nansha Islands,” the Chinese Ministry of Defense said.

RELATED: Experts: No break of precedent in Chinese deployment of planes in Mischief Reef

Read more at https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/05/03/1811793/chinas-missile-system-philippine-claimed-reefs-step-closer-airspace-control#GHmmpqXrAfdt23kI.99

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law.

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Beijing accuses US of ‘serious provocation’ after destroyer sails through disputed South China Sea

March 23, 2018

USS Mustin’s voyage near Mischief Reef prompts angry response a day after America announced plan to impose US$60 billion tariffs on Chinese imports

South China Morning Post

PUBLISHED : Friday, 23 March, 2018, 7:42pm
UPDATED : Friday, 23 March, 2018, 11:28pm
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China accused America of “serious military provocation” after a US Navy destroyer sailed within 12 nautical miles of an artificial island in the South China Sea – one day after the first move in what could develop into a full-blown trade war between the world’s two largest economies.

Beijing also announced it was staging a naval drill in the disputed waters on Friday, but said it was not targeted at any specific country.

The Chinese defence ministry said the USS Mustin had been “warned off” by two Chinese frigates.

An anonymous US official told Reuters that the destroyer was carrying out a “freedom of navigation” operation, passing within 12 nautical miles of Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands, where China has built an artificial island.

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China H-6K bomber over Scarborough

It was America’s first such operation since January and came a day after US President Donald Trump announced it would levy US$60 billion worth of tariffs on Chinese imports – triggering immediate retaliation from Beijing.

“What the US is doing will damage the military-to-military relations and atmosphere,” said Ren Guoqiang, a spokesman for the Chinese defence ministry.

“It could easily cause misjudgments and accidents at air or sea. This is a serious political and military provocation

to China and the Chinese military is firmly objecting to this.”

He said the action would push China to boost its defence capability in the region.

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China has militarized the South China Sea — even though they have no legal claim. This is Mischief Reef, now an extensive Chinese military base — one of seven Chinese military bases near the Philippines

The warning came as Beijing announced it was staging a combat exercise in the South China Sea on Friday.

“According to the PLA Navy personnel department, this is routine training as part of its annual plan to improve combat capability, and it is not aimed at any specific country or target,” official news agency Xinhua reported.

Ni Lexiong, a Shanghai-based military expert, believed the US had deliberately timed the challenge to Beijing – sailing near its outpost – for the same day China hit back at America’s punitive tariffs.

“This is a gesture, and it’s a combination of economic and military pressure,” he said.

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The PLA Navy drill could be a response to the US Navy’s “freedom of navigation” operation, Ni added.

“The PLA always have several contingency plans and they can quickly respond when they think a drill should be staged,” he said.

China refused to recognise an international tribunal ruling in 2016 that invalidated its claim over most of the resource-rich South China Sea. Its territorial claims are disputed by a number of countries in the region, and Beijing has continued to build islands and infrastructure in the disputed waters.

The Pentagon has meanwhile identified China and Russia as its two biggest military threats.

 http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2138677/beijing-accuses-us-serious-provocation-after-destroyer
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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law.

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We’ve heard 白痴國家 (Means “Idiot Nation”)

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South China Sea: China challenges aircraft — ‘You are entering Chinese airspace’ — Not true under international law

March 21, 2018

 

FILE – In this undated file photo released by Xinhua News Agency, a Chinese H-6K bomber patrols the islands and reefs in the South China Sea. Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said the Chinese have been challenging Philippine airplanes flying over its outposts in the Spratly Islands. Xinhua via AP/Liu Rui, File

Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) – March 21, 2018 – 5:31pm

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MANILA, Philippines –  China has been warning off Philippine planes doing patrols in the country’s airspace, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said Tuesday.
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Lorenzana, in a television interview, said that the military has been sending naval patrols of the country’s territory from time to time.
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“These planes, every time they fly over the features occupied by the Chinese, they challenge… Well, they will say ‘You are entering Chinese airspace,'” the Defense chief said, referring to Beijing’s artificial islands in the Spratlys.
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The Defense chief clarified that the Chinese and the Filipinos only exchange words when the latter conducts patrols in the West Philippine Sea.
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“They just exchange words, ‘No, we are passing by Philippine airspace.’ This is just a play of words but it happens every time our patrols go around,” Lorenzana said.
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Aside from the Air Force, the Coast Guard and the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources also conduct patrols in the West Philippine Sea.
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The Philippines is now using the Cessna aircraft that the US donated last year to conduct patrols over the waters surrounding the country.
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Lorenzana said that the Philippines did not have equipment for the aircraft upon receiving them last year. The aircraft from the US have been installed with equipment and are now capable of patrolling the country’s domains.

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ScanEagle can be used for patrols

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The ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicle system that the US recently donated to the Philippines may also be used for patrolling the West Philippine Sea and Philippine Rise.
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“They will be used in the south and also anywhere because they are very mobile. They can be transported easily because they are just put in a container,” Lorenzana said.
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Beijing has installed military capabilities in its “Big Three” islands in the Spratly Islands — Subi (Zamora), Mischief (Panganiban) and Fiery Cross (Kagitingan) Reefs.
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A March 2017 report from the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative showed that China’s naval, air, radar and defensive facilities in the artificial islands would allow them to deploy aircraft and mobile missile launchers to the Spratly Islands at any time.
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Kagitingan or Fiery Cross Reef contains communication facilities and is likely being used by China as its intelligence hub in the region, AMTI reported in February.
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Last month, President Rodrigo Duterte downplayed China’s militarization of the South China Sea and said that it is not intended for the Philippines.
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“It’s not intended for us. The contending ideological powers of the world or the geopolitics has greatly changed. It’s really intended against those who the Chinese think would destroy them and that is America,” Duterte said.
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Re.ad more at https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/03/21/1799000/china-challenges-philippine-planes-over-west-philippine-sea-lorenzana#QfWfs879wCSrFAOu.99

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law.

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We’ve heard 白痴國家 (Means “Idiot Nation”)

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China warns Philippine aircraft ‘every time’ they fly over the South China Sea

March 20, 2018
By: – Reporter / @FMangosingINQ
 / 07:41 PM March 20, 2018

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Map showing potential Chinese radar cover in the South China Sea, according to analysis by US-based Center for Strategic and International Studies. (Photo by ADRIAN LEUNG / AFP)

The Philippines continues to get warnings from China whenever it aerial patrols over the features of China, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said Tuesday, but without referring to the Spratlys in the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea).

“These [Philippine] planes, every time that they fly over these features of Chinese, they will challenge,” Lorenzana told “The Source,” a CNN Philippines program.

“They will say that you are entering Chinese airspace. Just exchange of words. Then we will say: ‘No, we are passing over Philippine airspace.’ It’s just a play of words every time we have patrols,” he said.

China has transformed some of the reefs claimed by the Philippines in the Spratlys into artificial islands capable of supporting military facilities, which has become a concern for several nations.

Three of these seven artificial islands have 3-kilometer airstrips that may be used by China to land military planes in the future.

For its part, the Philippines conducts regular patrols in its maritime domains in the West Philippine Sea and Philippine (formerly Benham) Rise as part of its mandate, Lorenzana said.

Aside from the aerial patrols, the Philippines holds naval patrols and sends vessels from the Philippine Coast Guard and the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources.

The Philippines recently acquired six drones worth $13.76 million from the United States through a grant. These drones could also be used to patrol those waters.

“Now that we have the drones and we have what you call the marine patrols, we send our naval patrols every now and then towards the areas,” Lorenzana said, referring to the West Philippine Sea and Philippine Rise.

But he said the drones would also be used in the southern part of the Philippines to patrol the sea lanes of Sulu.

“They can be transported easily because they will be put in a container. These are very powerful, very silent and can stay aloft for 24 hours,” he said. /atm

Read more: http://globalnation.inquirer.net/165165/china-warns-ph-planes-every-time-fly-west-philippine-sea#ixzz5AJTQkQLZ
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We’ve heard 白痴國家 (Means “Idiot Nation”)

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China has long had its eye on James Shoal and may move toward the island unless Malaysia or Indonesia protest…

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law.