Posts Tagged ‘Brexit’

Theresa May arrives at Europa Building, the main headquarters of European Council, in Brussels — EU officials have warned could be a “humiliating” encounter

June 22, 2017

Theresa May arrives at the Europa Building, the main headquarters of European Council, in Brussels ahead of the EU leaders summit

Theresa May arrives at the Europa Building, the main headquarters of European Council, in Brussels ahead of the EU leaders summit CREDIT: JOHN THYS/AFP

 

Theresa May has arrived in Brussels for what EU officials have warned could be a “humiliating” encounter as she holds talks on Brexit with EU leaders for the first time since losing her majority at the general election.

The Prime Minister will set out plans to give EU citizens legal rights in the UK after Brexit to help curry favour with her European…..

Read the entire report:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/06/22/theresa-may-set-humiliating-trip-brussels-makes-eu-citizens/

*************************************

Brexit: Theresa May arrives at European Council to lay out plans for EU citizens’ rights

It is her first meeting with European leaders since the general election in the UK

By Joe Watts Political Editor
The Independent

Theresa May repeats same comment three times as she ignores questions at EU summit

Theresa May has arrived at her first European Council summit since her election gamble saw her stripped of a Commons majority in the UK.

The Prime Minister spoke as she entered the Council building, choosing to ignore the thrust of reporters’ questions in favour of repeating three times how she intends to table proposals on EU citizens’ rights.

She also argued that the start of withdrawal talks earlier in the week had been “constructive”, despite her Brexit Secretary David Davis being forced into an embarrassing U-turn.

Ms May had called her election while promising to strengthen her hand so that she could better negotiate Brexit, and then caused outrage by accusing European leaders of trying to swing the vote.

But with talks under way she is due to use a dinner event on Thursday evening to outline how she intends to ensure the rights of EU and British citizens are protected after Brexit.

Asked how talks would go with her new weakened Government, she said it had been a “very constructive start”, adding: “But it’s also about how we will build a future special and deep partnership with our friends and allies in Europe.

“Today, I’m going to be setting out some of the UK’s plans, particularly on how we propose to protect the rights of EU citizens and UK citizens as we leave the European Union.”

After referencing an intention to work on counter-terrorism, she was asked whether the UK would compromise with EU negotiators, responding: “We will be going into negotiations. Those have started constructively.

“What I’m going to be setting out today is clearly how the United Kingdom proposes to protect the rights of EU citizens living in the UK, and see the rights of UK citizens living in Europe protected.

“That’s been an important issue. We’ve wanted it to be one of the early issues that’s considered in the negotiations, that is now the case, that work is starting. We will be setting out how we propose that EU citizens living in the UK have their rights protected in the United Kingdom.”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-latest-news-theresa-may-european-council-summit-eu-citizens-rights-brussels-a7802961.html

 ***************************************************
.
Reuters

In Brussels, weakened May to offer EU citizens rights

British Prime Minister Theresa May arrives at the EU summit in Brussels, Belgium, June 22, 2017. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
 .
By Elizabeth Piper and Alastair Macdonald | BRUSSELS

British Prime Minister Theresa May said at the start of a European Union summit on Thursday that she would reassure fellow leaders that her government will protect the rights of their citizens living in Britain after its departure from the bloc.

But other leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron, made clear that they did not want to get drawn into Brexit discussions and instead preferred to focus on the future of the EU without Britain.

At her first EU summit since a June 8 election sapped her authority to set the terms of Brexit, May said: “I’m going to be setting out some of the UK’s plans, particularly on how we propose to protect the rights of EU citizens and UK citizens as we leave the European Union.”

She seemed keen to calm the mood with the continentals after weeks of sniping during her election campaign, describing the first formal meeting of Brexit negotiators on Monday as “very constructive” and stressing that London wanted a “special and deep partnership with our friends and allies in Europe”.

Merkel also expressed a desire for constructive talks with Britain, but made clear that the EU’s priority now was its own future.

“I want to state clearly that the shaping of the future of the 27 has priority over the negotiations with Britain over its exit,” Europe’s leading power broker said on arrival.

“We will conduct these talks in a good spirit,” she added. “But the clear focus has to be on the future of the 27.”

France’s new president, Emmanuel Macron, spoke of working with Germany to revive European integration and did not refer at all to Britain during his remarks before talks got under way.

Over after-dinner coffee, May will outline her plan to provide early guarantees for some three million people living in Britain from other countries in the bloc, a British source said.

But her wings have been clipped – not only in Britain where voters denied her a majority in parliament, but also in Brussels where EU leaders will try to stop her from discussing Brexit beyond a quick briefing. One EU official said too much detail from May would be unhelpful, as it could provoke reactions.

Instead, once she has left the room, they will continue their own discussion of Britain’s departure from the European Union, notably on which city gets to host two EU agencies being pulled out of London – a potentially divisive issue for the 27.

“NOT THE ONLY DREAMER”

Weakened by an election she did not need to call, May has watered down her government’s program to try to get it through parliament and set a softer tone in her approach to Brexit.

Yet her aims have held – she wants a clean break from the bloc, leaving the lucrative single market and customs union and so reducing immigration and ending EU courts’ jurisdiction.

On Thursday, her finance minister, Philip Hammond called for an early agreement on transitional arrangements to ease uncertainty that he said was hurting business.

Reflecting, confusion on the continent about what kind of Brexit she will ask for, summit chair Donald Tusk said ahead of a separate meeting with May: “We can hear different predictions, coming from different people, about the possible outcome of these negotiations: hard Brexit, soft Brexit or no deal.”

Some Britons had asked him if he could imagine Britain not leaving after all: “The European Union was built on dreams that seemed impossible to achieve. So, who knows?,” the former Polish prime minister said before quoting John Lennon’s song “Imagine”:

“You may say I’m a dreamer, but I am not the only one.”

Other leaders took up the late Beatle’s theme. President Dalia Grybauskaite of Lithuania, which has over 100,000 citizens in Britain, insisted relations would remain close and tweeted the Motown lyric: “#Brexit: ain’t no mountain high enough”.

But Belgium Prime Minister Charles Michel, who argues for a need to protect EU integration from British ambivalence toward the project, tweeted: “It’s time for action and certainty. Not for dreams and uncertainty #Brexit #FutureofEurope”

Speaking to reporters at the summit, Michel said: “Theresa May is in a very difficult situation in terms of leadership so we will have to see what position Great Britain will defend.

“We can speculate, but it is a waste of time.”

SECURITY DISCUSSION

A British official said May would offer “new elements” in a paper on citizens’ rights to be published next week. There may be sticking points with Brussels, such as the cut-off date for EU citizens in Britain to retain rights under the bloc’s free movement rules and EU demands to preserve a panoply of rights in the future that may irk those keen to reduce immigrant numbers.

May will also aim to show that while still a member of the EU, Britain will contribute to other summit discussions, pressing for more action to encourage social media companies to clamp down on internet extremism and for the EU to roll over sanctions against Russia over the Ukraine crisis.

Driven by Germany and France’s new pro-EU president Macron, some EU states are keen to set up new defense cooperation of a kind that Britain has long resisted as a member. British officials say London, with little power to block them, now accepts the current EU proposals.

British strengths in the intelligence and security fields, as well as its military clout, are key elements in a future relationship with the EU that May wants to emphasize.

(Additional reporting by Alastair Macdonald, Robin Emmott, Jan Strupczewski, Elizabeth Miles and Alissa de Carbonnel in Brussels; Editing by Noah Barkin)

London Mayor Calls on UK to Retain Single Market Membership After Brexit

June 22, 2017

“The Brexit goalposts have been moved,” Khan said in a statement, adding that single market access should be ensured at least for the transition period during which Britain extracts itself from the EU.

“The government must now listen to the will of the people by putting aside ideology and negotiating a sensible Brexit that ensures continuing UK membership of the Single Market,” Khan said.

May has said she wants a clean break from the EU bloc, leaving the single market.

(Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge, editing by James Davey)

Tusk Holds Out Hope That Brexit Can Be Reversed

June 22, 2017

BRUSSELS — The Latest on the European Union summit (all times local):

11:20 a.m.

European Council President Donald Tusk says that he still holds out hope that Brexit can be reversed even though the negotiations on Britain’s departure from the European Union officially started this week.

Tusk has made the comments a few hours before a bilateral meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May. Tusk says that he had been asked by British friends if he could see a way of Britain still staying in.

Tusk said that “I told them that in fact the EU was built on dreams that seemed impossible to achieve.”

He added to that by quoting a John Lennon song: “So who knows? You may say I am a dreamer but I’m not the only one.”

___

10 a.m.

European Union leaders are gathering to weigh measures to tackle terrorism, closer defense ties and migration, convinced that anti-EU sentiment and support for populist parties are waning.

Before the two-day meeting in Brussels starting Thursday, summit chairman Donald Tusk trumpeted the resurgence of the EU, even as Britain launched talks this week on leaving.

Tusk told the leaders in an invitation letter that after a series of election defeats for anti-migrant parties, notably in France, the EU is “slowly turning the corner.”

He said “we are witnessing the return of the EU rather as a solution, not a problem.”

British Prime Minister Theresa May is due to praise the good atmosphere at Monday’s Brexit talks, and explain how to protect the rights of citizens hit by Britain’s departure.

 

Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Hammond: Theresa May will Still Be PM at year end — Headlines Still Proclaim “Constitutional Crisis”

June 22, 2017
Reuters

Theresa May will still be British leader at the end of this year, finance minister Philip Hammond said on Thursday.

May’s future is unclear after her botched gamble on a snap election left her Conservative Party short of a majority in parliament.

Asked by BBC television if he believed May would remain premier into 2018, despite presiding over a minority government, Hammond replied: “Yes I do.”

“I would remind you that when we formed the coalition (with the Liberal Democrats) in 2010 people… were saying then ‘Oh it won’t last till Christmas’. But it proved extraordinarily resilient,” Hammond said.

(Reporting by James Davey; editing by Guy Faulconbridge)

************************************

Theresa May faces constitutional crisis as Labour and Lib Dems vow to vote down manifesto pledges ‘which failed to gain public support’ 

By

Theresa May is facing a constitutional crisis after Labour and the Liberal Democrats threatened to use the House of Lords to water down Brexit.

The Prime Minister is facing a battle to get the crucial legislation through the upper chamber after it emerged that peers may seek to ignore a 72-year convention and block new laws paving the way for Britain leaving the single market and EU customs union.

State Opening of Parliament 2017 
Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn during the State Opening of Parliament 

The Salisbury Convention states that manifesto commitments made by a governing party should not be blocked or significantly altered by the Lords.

Read the rest:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/06/21/theresa-may-faces-constitutional-crisis-labour-lib-dems-vow/

© AFP | Theresa May will meet EU leaders for the first time since her Conservative party unexpectedly lost its majority

Humbled PM Theresa May hopes to reassure EU leaders at Brussels summit

June 22, 2017

AFP

© Stephane De Sakutin, AFP | Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May and French President Emmanuel Macron talk during the G7 summit in Italy on May 26, 2017.

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2017-06-22

Embattled British Prime Minister Theresa May will try Thursday to convince European leaders she can still push through Brexit despite being badly weakened by an election bet that turned sour.

The two-day Brussels summit marks the debut of French President Emmanuel Macron, the figurehead of a renewed confidence among the remaining 27 states that Britain’s withdrawal can be a fresh start.

But talks on issues including post-Brexit defence plans risk being overshadowed by concerns that a disastrous election has left May so enfeebled that Brexit negotiations will be hampered.

“There is an enormous insecurity among the Europeans: how long will she last? Has she got the majority to deliver?” a senior EU official said.

In Brussels, security has been stepped up after Tuesday’s bombing at one of the city’s main rail stations by an Islamic State sympathiser, following attacks in Britain and France.

Over dinner, May is expected to fill in some of the blanks for the other EU leaders on Brexit.

It will be their first meeting since her Conservative party unexpectedly lost its majority in a June 8 election, leaving her in charge of a so-called “zombie government“.

Britain’s shock referendum vote to leave the EU was a year ago on Friday, and the country remains in a dark national mood after a string of terror attacks and a deadly tower block blaze.

May citizens offer

“The PM will give an update to the other member states on the UK’s Brexit plans following the beginning of the negotiations this week,” a Downing Street spokesman said.

During the dinner May will “outline some principles of the UK’s paper on citizens rights which will be published at the beginning of next week,” the spokesman said.

The EU has made a priority of the rights of three million European citizens living in Britain, plus a million Britons resident in Europe.

At the first formal Brexit negotiations Monday, Britain accepted the EU’s timetable that the exit bill, citizens’ rights and the Northern Ireland border be settled before its request for a free trade deal be considered.

EU diplomatic sources said May will try to keep it simple, with no discussion.

“We believe that the warming-up round of last Monday did create a positive atmosphere … I don’t think that May will want to shatter that understanding,” said one EU diplomatic source, who asked not to named.

After her comments, May will leave the room for the remaining 27 EU member states to discuss what she has told them, and the future relocation of key EU agencies from London.

‘Turning the corner’

EU President Donald Tusk said the bloc appeared to have survived the worst of the anti-EU sentiment which drove Britain’s shock vote to leave exactly a year to the day on Friday.

“The current developments on the continent seem to indicate that we are slowly turning the corner,” the former Polish premier wrote in his invitation letter.

His upbeat assessment follows a series of election setbacks for populist and eurosceptic parties, including French far-right leader Marine Le Pen, who lost heavily to newcomer Macron in last month’s presidential poll.

Macron has joined forces with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, pledging to put a post-Brexit EU back on track to deliver prosperity and security after years of austerity and crisis.

Macron and Merkel are expected to recommend another six-month rollover of tough economic sanctions imposed in 2014 against Russia over the conflict in eastern Ukraine, which has claimed 10,000 lives.

The French and German leaders will brief their peers on the Minsk ceasefire process, which has seen continued clashes between Kiev forces and Russian-backed rebels.

Tusk and European Commission head Jean-Claude Juncker are also expected to report on recent meetings with US President Donald Trump.

Trump’s “America First” approach and dismissive remarks about the EU and NATO have and bolstered calls for the European Union to take on an increased defence role, while his decision to pull out of the Paris climate pact infuriated Europe.

The EU leaders will also discuss plans to push internet firms to clamp down on online extremism, and Europe’s migration crisis.

In Brussels, Weakened May to Outline Guarantees for EU Expats in Britain

June 21, 2017

LONDON/BRUSSELS — Prime Minister Theresa May will outline on Thursday her approach to the “hugely important issue” of reassuring EU expatriates about their futures in Britain, at a summit that is her first Brexit test since an election sapped her authority.

Over coffee at the end of dinner on the first day of the EU summit, May will address the other 27 leaders and describe “principles” of her plan to give early guarantees to some three million people living in Britain who come from other countries in the bloc.

But her wings have been clipped – not only in Britain where voters denied her a majority in parliament, but also in Brussels where EU leaders will try to stop her from discussing Brexit beyond a quick presentation.

Instead, once she has left the room, they will continue their own discussion of Britain’s departure from the European Union.

“My understanding all along is that this is a hugely important issue for Britain and for the 27 that has been clear from the very outset of this process,” a senior British government source said of the question of EU expatriates.

“We want to provide early assurance, and it has always been our position that we want to outline our principles at this dinner and that is what we are going to do.”

The source said Britain was “perfectly content” with the arrangements. Last week, one diplomat said May had tried to “hijack” the summit taking place on Thursday and Friday by drawing other leaders into wider discussions on Brexit. [nL8N1JD4VX]

Another British official said May would offer “new elements” in a paper to be published early next week. There may be sticking points with Brussels, such as the cut-off date for EU citizens in Britain to retain rights under the bloc’s free movement rules.

To show the “goodwill” her aides often refer to, May will have a separate conversation with European Council President Donald Tusk and hopes to have other one-on-one meetings. But it is not clear whether she will make any headway on the Brexit talks, which began in Brussels on Monday.

SOFTER TONE

Weakened by an election she did not need to call, May has watered down her government’s program to try to get it through parliament and set a softer tone in her approach to Brexit.

Yet her aims have held – she wants a clean break from the bloc, leaving the lucrative single market and customs union and so reducing immigration into Britain and removing her country from the jurisdiction of EU courts.

On Monday, her Brexit minister, David Davis, described the first day of Brexit talks to unravel more than 40 years of union as setting a “solid foundation” for future discussions.

But one Western diplomat from a non-EU country said it was hard to see how some members would be open to fruitful discussions.

“Some are still grieving, some are mad and some are just sad,” the diplomat said. “They seem to spend more time complaining about what Britain says rather than cracking on with a deal that will produce a strong Britain and strong EU.”

A senior EU diplomat said the bloc was ready to listen to what May had to say.

“The EU 27 position is clear in terms of what conditions we’d like to see for our citizens there and what we can offer for UK citizens here,” the diplomat said.

May will also aim to show that while still a member of the EU, Britain will contribute to other summit discussions, pressing for more action to encourage social media companies to clamp down on internet extremism and for the EU to roll over sanctions against Russia over the Ukraine crisis.

She will announce a new 75 million-pound ($95 million) package of aid for migrants and help for them to return to their home countries, in the hope of discouraging people from making the “treacherous journey” to Europe.

(Additional reporting by Alastair Macdonald, Robin Emmott, Jan Strupczewski, Elizabeth Miles and Alissa de Carbonnel in Brussels; editing by Andrew Roche)

Queen’s Speech live: Theresa May tears up Tory manifesto pledges as she unveils plans for hard Brexit

June 21, 2017

By 

Theresa May has unveiled plans for a hard Brexit as she shredded the Tories’ general election manifesto in her Queen’s Speech.

Read the rest:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/06/21/queens-speech-watch-live-theresa-may-jeremy-corbyn-dup/

*******************************************

Queen’s speech 2017: Government will deliver eight separate bills on Brexit – live

Rolling coverage of the Queen’s speech, with analysis of all the bills and coverage of the opening of the debate featuring Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn

Queen’s speech debate.

Zombie UK government unveils Brexit laws — Jeremy Corbyn smiling

June 21, 2017

AFP

© Kirsty Wigglesworth / POOL / AFP | Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May (L) and Britain’s opposition Labour party Leader Jeremy Corbyn (R) walk from the House of Commons to the House of Lords during the State Opening of Parliament

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2017-06-21

Prime Minister Theresa May, leading a “zombie” government after a disastrous election, on Wednesday unveiled a diluted programme of action that included the mammoth legislation needed to take Britain out of the EU.

The state opening of parliament by Queen Elizabeth II came after a string of tragedies which have shaken the nation, and the election on June 8 in which May’s Conservatives saw their parliamentary majority wiped out.

The queen, at an occasion shorn of its usual pageantry, read out the watered-down list of proposed legislation and lawmakers will then spend the next few days debating before bringing it to a vote.

May could be forced to resign if she loses the vote, expected on June 29, just as the country embarks on highly sensitive negotiations for Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union.

After four terror attacks and a deadly tower block blaze that have darkened the national mood, anti-government protesters are also planning a “Day of Rage” in the streets that will converge outside parliament with temperatures forecast to hit 34 degrees Celsius (93 degrees Fahrenheit) — London’s hottest June day since 1976.

May humbled

The enfeebled premier, who is still locked in difficult talks with a Northern Irish party to prop up her administration, says the programme is about seizing opportunities offered by Brexit.

The queen said: “My government’s priority is to secure the best possible deal as the country leaves the European Union.”

She said her government would seek “to build the widest possible consensus on the country’s future outside the European Union”, amid divisions within May’s own cabinet over the best strategy.

The speech announced no fewer than eight bills to implement Brexit, and new legislation aimed at tackling extremist content online after the terror attacks.

But the speech was notable also for what it did not contain.

There was no mention of May’s hugely controversial invitation to US President Donald Trump to come on a state visit.

Also absent were key pledges the Conservatives had given in their manifesto for the recent election which analysts said had bombed with the electorate — such as reform of social care for the elderly and more shake-ups in schools.

There was also no mention of May’s controversial promise to allow a parliamentary vote to repeal a ban on fox hunting, which angered left-wingers.

The Times branded May’s administration the “stumbling husk of a zombie government” and said she was now “so weak that she cannot arbitrate between squabbling cabinet ministers”.

“Downing Street is a vacuum,” the newspaper said, two days after Britain and the EU formally started their Brexit negotiations.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said he was ready to step in and build a rival government — although he and other opposition parties lack the collective numbers to bring down May.

“This is an unstable coalition, it’s not even a coalition, they haven’t even got an agreement with the DUP (Democratic Unionist Party),” he said.

“We’re ready to form, obviously, a minority government if this government collapses and it may well,” Corbyn said, while raising the possibility of a fresh election if parliamentary deadlock continues.

No deal yet

May called the snap general election in a bid to strengthen her mandate heading into the Brexit talks.

But the plan spectacularly backfired, leaving her with a minority government that is now trying to form a majority with Northern Ireland’s ultra-conservative DUP.

May has resisted calls to resign and is hoping for the support of the DUP’s 10 MPs to boost her tally of 317 seats in the 650-seat parliament, but a deal has proved elusive so far.

A DUP source said a deal was “certainly not imminent” as the talks “haven’t proceeded in a way that the DUP would have expected” and cautioned that the party “can’t be taken for granted”.

But even with DUP backing, the government would command only a tiny majority, and just a few rebel MPs could be enough to undermine it fatally.

The Queen’s Speech, normally a chance for a new government to show off an ambitious programme, is usually a high point of British pomp, but this year there was no horse-drawn carriage procession, crown or ceremonial robes.

The snap election plus the closeness to the monarch’s official birthday parade last weekend meant it was deemed infeasible to prepare a second major event at short notice.

The speech was initially planned for Monday but was postponed because of the turmoil following the election.

The government has said this session of parliament will last two years — meaning there would be no Queen’s Speech next year — in order to be able to pass the vast amount of Brexit-related legislation.

But opposition parties have said it is a way for the government to avoid being voted down in a Queen’s Speech next year, when talks in Brussels are expected to get tougher ahead of Britain’s expected EU exit in March 2019.

Queen’s Speech 2017: Theresa May promises ‘humility’

June 21, 2017

BBC News

Media caption The Queen’s Speech – a beginner’s guide

Prime Minister Theresa May has promised to work with “humility and resolve” as the government prepares to outline its legislative programme later.

Brexit is expected to dominate the Queen’s Speech, which will cover a two-year period instead of one.

It is also expected to include measures on domestic violence and car insurance.

The Conservatives are still trying to agree terms with the Democratic Unionists to secure their support for Mrs May’s minority government.

It means some manifesto pledges are likely to be scaled back or scrapped.

Sources from the DUP have warned that the party cannot be “taken for granted”, although it is expected to back the Queen’s Speech when MPs vote on it next week.

The speech is written by the government but read by the Queen at the State Opening of Parliament.

It is the main ceremonial event of the Parliamentary calendar – but this year’s will look different, with much of the usual formalities dispensed with and the Queen wearing “day dress” instead of her usual robes.

The speech will be delivered at 11:30 BST and will be covered live on BBC One, Radio 5 live and online. MPs will begin debating its contents in the afternoon.

With Brexit talks now under way, the government is expected to set out the laws needed to leave the EU – irrespective of the final deal agreed with Brussels.

At the heart of this is the so-called Great Repeal Bill – which will repeal the 1972 European Communities Act and end the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

It will also copy existing EU legislation to the UK statute book, and Parliament will decide which bits to retain.

A dressed-down Queen’s Speech

Scaled back Queen’s Speech will look a little different
  • The Queen will arrive at Parliament in a car, rather than horse-drawn carriage
  • There will be no royal procession into the House of Lords chamber and the Queen will wear “day dress” rather than robes
  • Her crown will be driven to the Lords in its own car, but she will wear a hat instead
  • It is the first state opening with “reduced ceremonial elements” since 1974
  • This was agreed because of timing issues caused by the snap election – rehearsals clashed with Saturday’s Trooping the Colour event

Other areas where Brexit-related laws are expected include immigration, customs and agriculture.

The government has cancelled next year’s Queen’s Speech, so this one will cover a two-year period to give MPs more time to debate all the Brexit legislation.

Mrs May said the speech would be about “grasping the opportunities that lie ahead for the United Kingdom as we leave the European Union”.

She said: “The election result was not the one I hoped for, but this government will respond with humility and resolve to the message the electorate sent.

“We will work hard every day to gain the trust and confidence of the British people, making their priorities our priorities.”

John McDonnell tells BBC Radio 4’s Today Labour wants to reverse austerity

First the government needs to get a Brexit deal that “commands maximum public support”, she said.

“While this will be a government that consults and listens, we are clear that we are going to see Brexit through, working with Parliament, business, the devolved administrations and others to ensure a smooth and orderly withdrawal.”

Ministers have said some parts of the Conservative manifesto would have to be “pruned” following the election result.

These could include controversial plans to axe the winter fuel allowance for well-off pensioners and expanding grammar schools while other proposals, such as a cap on energy bills, will be put out to consultation.

‘Not legitimate’

First Secretary of State Damian Green, a close ally of Theresa May, rejected claims controversial reforms to adult social care funding had been abandoned totally, saying there would be a consultation, prior to legislation, as “getting the details right is difficult and important”.

Mr Green told BBC Radio 4’s Today this was not a “thin” Queen’s Speech since it included a wealth of non-Brexit bills, including a digital charter to boost online safety and legislation on the next phase of the HS2 high-speed rail line.

Although the Conservatives had fallen short of a majority, he said it was “our duty to present our legislative programme to the House of Commons and then to get on with governing”.

Other manifesto pledges that will feature include:

  • a Civil Liability Bill, designed to address the “compensation culture” around motoring insurance claims
  • a Domestic Violence and Abuse Bill, establishing a Domestic Violence and Abuse Commissioner to stand up for victims and survivors and monitor the response of the authorities
  • a Tenant’s Fees Bill, banning landlords from charging “letting fees”

Labour and the Liberal Democrats each plan to put forward alternative versions of the Queen’s Speech.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell said the Conservatives had “no right to govern”, having “junked their manifesto”.

“They have got the right to bring forward their own programme, but I don’t believe, actually, that they are legitimate in the sense that they have got a mandate that they asked for,” he told Today.

The Lib Dems said their version would call for continued membership of the EU single market and customs union after Brexit.

Party leader Tim Farron said: “This is a government with no clue, no direction and no mandate. The Conservatives may be scaling back on their domestic agenda now that they have no majority to deliver it.”

Related:

The Latest: Queen to Outline UK Government Plans

June 21, 2017

LONDON — The Latest on the Queen’s Speech outlining UK government program (all times local):

11:00 a.m.

Queen Elizabeth II will outline the government’s legislative program with far less pageantry than usual Wednesday in a speech expected to be dominated by a discussion of Britain’s plans for leaving the European Union.

The speech comes after May lost her majority in a snap election earlier this month, leaving her to head a minority government with no deal so far to insure that the government can deliver on its agenda. Normally this speech repeats key legislative promises made during the election campaign, but May is expected to omit the most controversial items of her election manifesto because they were rejected by a majority of voters.

___

9:00 a.m.

Queen Elizabeth II will outline the government’s legislative program with far less pageantry than usual Wednesday in a speech expected to be dominated by a discussion of Britain’s plans for leaving the European Union.

The program set out in the so-called Queen’s Speech at the state opening of Parliament will include “a number of bills” intended to make Brexit successful, according to Prime Minister Theresa May’s office. While the Queen reads the speech to lawmakers, it is written by the prime minister and her staff. May is promising a government “that consults and listens.”

“The election result was not the one I hoped for, but this government will respond with humility and resolve to the message the electorate sent,” May said in a statement. “We will work hard every day to gain the trust and confidence of the British people, making their priorities our priorities.”

Related: