Posts Tagged ‘Britain’s exit from the European Union’

A Look at What Is Ahead Now That Brexit Talks Have Started

June 19, 2017

BRUSSELS — The talks on Britain’s exit from the European Union finally started Monday when EU negotiator Michel Barnier said “Welcome David” to his counterpart, David Davis, and led him toward a huge oval table at the European Commission headquarters.

As the negotiations kick off, here’s a look at some of the major issues the sides face.

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DIVORCE FIRST

They will first have to unravel the British from the EU, which will be challenging to say the least. That will involve everything from deciding what waters each side can fish in to how nuclear agreements should be renegotiated. Only when there is “sufficient progress” does the EU want to look at creating a new relationship with Britain on things like trade and migration. Britain hopes the two themes — divorce terms and future relationship — can be discussed in parallel.

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WHAT DIVORCE ISSUES GET TACKLED FIRST?

While Britain has struggled to agree on and present a coherent list of demands, the 27 EU nations have had one message all along — in the words of Barnier on Monday: “We must first tackle the uncertainties caused by Brexit.” It means clarifying the fate of EU citizens in Britain and vice versa, how to manage the border between Ireland and the U.K., and how much Britain will pay.

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MONEY, MONEY, MONEY

The EU says Britain can’t leave without settling its bill, paying up for all its commitments that are still ongoing, including projects that might reach into the next decade, as well as the U.K.’s share of EU staff pensions. EU officials have put the figure at around 50 billion euros ($63 billion) while other estimates by think tanks and in the media go as high as twice that amount. As in any divorce, count on both sides to be picky in splitting the goods and dues.

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WHAT ARE THE RED LINES?

The EU says it will not compromise on its core “four freedoms”: free movement of goods, capital, services and workers. Britain insists that it must regain the right to control immigration and end free movement from other EU countries into Britain. May says Britain will leave the EU’s single market in goods and services and its tariff-free customs union, but nonetheless, somehow, wants “frictionless” free trade.

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DEAL OR NO DEAL?

Even though May triggered the two-year process on March 29, negotiators will have to get a full agreement much faster than March 2019. EU nations and the European Parliament will have to approve any future deal and that can take months. EU officials have therefore put the realistic deadline at October — and at the latest November — of 2018. If no deal is struck by then, the sides may have to create a transitional deal, possibly prolonging some of the current relationship.

If Britain crashes out of the EU without a deal, that would create huge uncertainties for citizens and businesses as well as issues like global security. How bad that would be in reality is anyone’s guess.

UK Labour Leader Corbyn Says Brexit Talks Must Go Ahead After Inconclusive Poll

June 9, 2017

LONDON — Talks on Britain’s exit from the European Union must go ahead, opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said on Friday, after Prime Minister Theresa May failed to win a majority in parliament in a national election.

May, whose Conservative Party won the most seats, has signaled she will use her right as incumbent to make the first attempt to form a government, but it is unclear whether she will have the necessary support to do so.

Asked whether Brexit negotiations, due to start on June 19, should be delayed, Corbyn told Sky News: “They’re going to have to go ahead because Article 50 has been invoked, the government in office in 11 days time will have to conduct those Brexit negotiations.”

“Our position is very clear, we want a jobs-first Brexit, therefore the most important thing is the trade deal with Europe,” he added.

Corbyn said Labour had won the election as it saw an increase in seats and vote share, and the party was ready to lead a minority government.

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan and William James, editing by Elizabeth Piper)

British PM Theresa May under fire in televised debate — Corbyn accuses May of “subservience” to Trump

June 3, 2017

France 24 and The Associated Press

© Stefan Rousseau / POOL / AFP | British Prime Minister Theresa May takes part in “The Question Time, Leaders Special” hosted by David Dimbleby

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2017-06-03

With less than a week until Britain votes in a national election, Prime Minister Theresa May faced tough questions from voters Friday about her Conservative government’s cuts to welfare and health spending.

She was also accused by opponents of failing to stand up to the United States over its withdrawal from the Paris climate accord.

May and opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn appeared before a live audience on prime-time TV — but consecutively, rather than side by side.

May has refused to take part in any televised debates, saying she prefers to answer questions directly from voters. Friday’s show may have tested that preference, as audience members criticized the prime minister for presiding over stagnant wages for nurses and cuts for those needed physical and mental care.

Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May

Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May. EPA/GETTY

May said the government had “had to take some hard choices across the public sector” to curb spending and reduce the country’s deficit.

She also denied breaking promises, including her vow not to call an early election. May said she “had the balls to call an election” because it was important to give the government a stronger mandate to negotiate Britain’s exit from the European Union.

May spoke after President Donald Trump’s announcement that he would pull out of the Paris accord sent the issue of climate change — and May’s attempts to bolster the trans-Atlantic “special relationship” — to the top of the agenda in campaigning for Britain’s June 8 election.

May’s said she spoke to Trump by phone “and told him that the U.K. believes in the Paris agreement and that we didn’t want the United States to leave the Paris agreement.”

But Britain did not sign a joint statement by the leaders of Germany, France and Italy, who said they regretted Trump’s decision and insisted that the accord cannot be renegotiated.

May’s office would not say whether she had been asked to sign it. May noted that Japan and Canada — fellow members of the G-7 group of rich industrialized nations — also were not signatories, but like Britain remain committed to the Paris agreement.

“I made the U.K.’s position clear to President Trump last week at the G-7 meeting, as did the other G-7 leaders, and I made the position clear to President Trump last night,” May said Friday.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said not signing the declaration was an “appalling abdication of leadership.”

Corbyn accused May of “subservience” to Trump.

The Labour leader, a veteran left-winger who was given little chance of beating May at the start of the election, has had a good campaign and seen his poll ratings rise.

Corbyn also was made to squirm by the television audience, who pressed him on his opposition to Britain’s nuclear arsenal, and asked if he would be prepared to use atomic weapons if Britain was threatened.

He did not answer definitively, but said he would “do everything I can to ensure that any threat is actually dealt with earlier on by negotiations and by talks.”

“I think the idea of anyone ever using a nuclear weapon anywhere in the world is utterly appalling and terrible,” Corbyn said.

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London finance chief upbeat after Brexit trigger

April 9, 2017

AFP

© AFP/File / by Roland JACKSON | A person holds Union Flags near the Houses of Parliament in London, on March 29, 2017, after British Prime Minister Theresa May activated the process for Britain’s exit from the European Union

LONDON (AFP) – The outlook for London’s financial sector has improved since Brexit was triggered, insists the man charged with its policy, even as banks remain set to move some jobs abroad.

Mark Boleat, who spoke on Thursday to AFP after British Prime Minister Theresa May activated the process for Britain’s EU exit, nevertheless urged speedy trade talks to minimise disruption.

The signing of Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty late last month has kick-started a two-year countdown to Brexit.

“On the whole, I think things are looking rather better,” Boleat said when asked about the impact on London’s financial sector, otherwise known as the City.

“We would hope that the negotiations go quickly and go well,” he said.

If early agreement could be reached on the terms for exit and on the rights of EU nationals, “there will be the minimum of disruption to business and consumers in this country — and in Europe,” said Boleat, who steps down next month as policy chairman of the City of London Corporation.

Bank of England chief Governor Mark Carney on Friday warned of sector-wide consequences of leaving without a trade deal, but was optimistic for an agreement.

– London to lose bank jobs –

In the run-up to last year’s Brexit referendum, the business community threw its weight behind the failed Remain campaign, arguing it would prompt large-scale City job losses.

So far, HSBC has stated it would likely shift 1,000 jobs to Paris, where the banking titan already has a significant operation.

US player Goldman Sachs will meanwhile move 1,000 staff from London to Frankfurt.

Boleat sought, however, to calm jitters over banks shifting jobs to other major European hubs.

“Banks have had contingency plans since before the Brexit referendum in some cases. They have known there is a possibility that Britain will not be in the single market — that has now been confirmed.”

Many banks “will need to restructure what they are doing — perhaps cease doing a few things, in some cases build up business elsewhere in the European Union. They are getting on and doing that.”

And he cited US investment bank JPMorgan’s chief executive Jamie Dimon, who stated this week that he did not foresee shifting many staff from Britain over the next two years because of Brexit.

“I don’t think businesses are going to announce what they are doing in a great fanfare,” Boleat said.

As executives such as Jamie Dimon had pointed out, “we are going to need to build up our resources in other EU member states.”

A few people would be moved, but “no one is going to say: we are closing down in London,” he said.

Historic insurance market Lloyd’s of London was the first group to respond to the Brexit trigger, announcing it will open a Brussels subsidiary in early 2019.

The market, which insures against catastrophes such as earthquakes, shipwrecks and revolutions, is seeking to ensure its continued access across the bloc.

– ‘It will not be Lloyd’s of Brussels’ –

Lloyd’s is “a unique organisation. It’s not a company, it’s a market. They will have to do something if Britain is outside the single market,” Boleat told AFP.

“They have spent a long time looking at location. They have decided it’s Brussels.”

But that was only part of their business, he said.

“It’s Lloyd’s of London. The vast bulk of its business will stay in London. It will not be Lloyd’s of Brussels,” the departing policy chief added.

Boleat also argued that the future location of euro clearing — the processing of euro currency transactions — should remain in London.

Image result for euro currency , Photos

France has been particularly vocal that other EU hubs should be ready to take over from London.

“The clearing is done in London because that is where the expertise is. That’s where the market is. Brexit will not change that,” Boleat said.

“Euro clearing is already a political football — but we hope that economic reality will determine the outcome, not a wish to have a trophy function move to another place.”

by Roland JACKSON

Brexit Supreme Court ruling: UK government loses case to trigger Article 50 without parliamentary vote

January 24, 2017

Verdict to be delivered on whether Prime Minister has enough authority to enact Brexit alone, or must get MPs’ approval

theresa-may-face.jpg

The Supreme Court is due to announce its verdict on Theresa May’s Brexit plans; ruling whether she can withdraw Britain from the EU alone or must get approval from MPs and peers first.

Here are the latest updates

Please wait a moment for the live blog to load

Their decision will affect whether Ms May has enough authority to trigger Article 50 on her own, the process through which a country can begin to leave the EU.he case has been brought by banker Gina Miller, along with other appellants including a crowd-funded cohort titled The Peoples’ Challenge. They argued that despite the 23 June referendum, which saw Britain vote to leave the EU, MPs are still entitled to vote on whether or not it actually happens.

In November, the High Court heard the case and ruled against the government. The Prime Minister’s lawyers appealed the case meaning it was transferred to the Supreme Court.

It is widely expected the government will also lose this case.

Britain’s Supreme Court Set to Rule on Brexit Case

January 24, 2017

LONDON — Britain’s Supreme Court will rule Tuesday on whether the prime minister or Parliament has the right to trigger the process of taking Britain out of the European Union.

The 11 justices will either uphold an earlier ruling giving Parliament a direct role in invoking Article 50 of the EU’s Lisbon Treaty or reject that ruling in favor of the government’s claim it can do so without a vote in Parliament. Article 50, which has never been used before, starts the formal process of taking Britain out of the 28-nation EU.

Here are answers to some key questions about the case.

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Britain’s Supreme Court

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WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT?

Prime Minister Theresa May has pledged to start the Article 50 process, which is expected to last two years, by the end of March.

European leaders want to get talks underway, and some British voters who backed Brexit in a June referendum are getting impatient.

Having Parliament play a direct role could slow the process down.

Although the leader of the opposition Labour Party says its legislators will back Brexit out of respect for the referendum result, the process could easily be delayed in the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

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WHAT HAPPENS IF THE GOVERNMENT LOSES ITS APPEAL?

May’s ministers have prepared several draft pieces of legislation that could be introduced in Parliament.

The goal is to craft a very short, limited bill that would give May the authority to invoke Article 50, but would be difficult to amend or tamper with.

The bill that is introduced would be shaped in large part by the actual decision, which may spell out specific requirements.

The government has drawn up various contingency plans to deal with guidelines that may be imposed by the court. The judges could say, for example, that a single vote in Parliament would be sufficient, or it could require the more time-consuming drafting of a law.

The government would likely move quickly to introduce a bill with the goal of meeting the March deadline.

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COULD A LOSS FOR THE GOVERNMENT MEAN AN END TO BREXIT?

It’s very unlikely Parliament would vote against the government’s proposal given the referendum result.

It would be seen by Brexit supporters and many who opposed it as an anti-democratic measure thwarting the will of the people.

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WHAT IF THE GOVERNMENT WINS?

A reversal of the lower court ruling would give May the authority to start Article 50 negotiations when she chooses without input from Parliament.

She has said, however, that Parliament will be asked to approve any Brexit deal reached at the conclusion of the talks.

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WILL THE RULING BE A SIMPLE YES OR NO ON THE GOVERNMENT APPEAL?

No, the ruling could become more complicated. The judges must consider bids from Scottish, Welsh and Northern Ireland politicians to have their legislatures given a role in the process because Article 50 would significantly change the powers granted to them through devolution.

A ruling in that direction could slow the process, particularly since the Northern Ireland Assembly is about to be dissolved, with elections set for March 2. The Scottish Parliament is also problematic for the government, since it is dominated by legislators who want to remain in the EU.

Related:

5 Things to Watch From the U.K. Supreme Court’s Brexit Ruling

January 24, 2017

The U.K.’s Supreme Court on Tuesday delivers a ruling on whether Prime Minister Theresa May needs the approval of Parliament to trigger Brexit, in one of the most politically charged cases in decades. Here’s a quick look at what the decision could mean:

  • 1  The ruling concludes a landmark case

    Britain’s Supreme Court, its highest judicial body, will give a roughly six- or seven-minute decision, concluding a high-profile case on whether Mrs. May can use the “royal prerogative”–the executive authority given to ministers to govern on the monarch’s behalf–to launch divorce proceedings with the European Union, expected to start by the end of March. The plaintiffs, led by investment manager Gina Miller, argue that triggering Article 50 needs parliamentary approval, as leaving the EU would mean British citizens lose certain rights linked to Britain’s membership. In November, London’s High Court agreed, prompting a government appeal.

    Gina Miller, lead plaintiff

    ZUMA PRESS
  • 2  If the government loses…

    The ruling concerns the legal process by which Britain plans to exit the EU–not the decision to leave itself. The court could require Mrs. May to get parliamentary approval, meaning she would likely introduce a bill that would have to go Parliament. What that bill would look like depends on the ruling and what it requires, potentially giving the lawmakers, who were largely in favor of Britain’s continued EU membership, a say on the U.K.’s negotiation strategy.

  • 3…but it is unlikely to stop Brexit 

    Both major parties in Parliament say they respect the outcome of the June 23 referendum, when 52% of Britons voted to leave the EU. The opposition Labour Party has said it will not oppose triggering Article 50. Mrs. May says she intends to stick to her plan to trigger Article 50 by the end of March.

    EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
  • Investors are paying close attention

    Mrs. May has also promised that she would grant lawmakers a vote on the final deal, a pledge that prompted a sharp rally in sterling after it plummeted on concerns about leaving the single market for goods and services. A final ruling giving parliamentarians a say on launching the negotiations is likely to be welcomed by markets.

  • There are other complications

    The court could also signal what role, if any, the devolved assemblies of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland should play in the process of triggering Article 50. Voters in Northern Ireland and Scotland backed remaining in the EU, while those in England and Wales supported Brexit. The Scottish administration has threatened to push for another independence referendum should it decide that Scotland’s interests are not being taken into account.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/briefly/2017/01/23/5-things-to-watch-from-the-u-k-supreme-courts-brexit-ruling/

    Related:

Prime Minister Theresa May will learn on Tuesday whether parliament must agree to the triggering of Britain’s exit from the European Union — UK Supreme Court will give its ruling at 9:30 a.m. (0930 GMT)

January 24, 2017

Live: May Corbyn Miller

Comment:In Britain and France, the Left faces doom: it cannot understand the age of Brexit  

Reuters

By Michael Holden and William James | LONDON

Prime Minister Theresa May will learn on Tuesday whether parliament must agree to the triggering of Britain’s exit from the European Union, potentially giving lawmakers who oppose her plans a chance to amend or hinder her Brexit vision.

The UK Supreme Court will give its ruling at 9:30 a.m. (0930 GMT) in a landmark case on whether May can use executive powers known as known as “royal prerogative” to invoke Article 50 of the EU’s Lisbon Treaty and begin two years of divorce talks.

Challengers, led by investment manager Gina Miller and backed by the Scottish government and others, say under Britain’s unwritten constitution May must first get lawmakers’ approval as leaving the EU will strip Britons of rights they were granted by parliament.

That view was backed by London’s High Court, prompting the government to appeal to the Supreme Court, the highest judicial body in the land.

If May wins the case, she can follow her planned timetable for invoking Article 50 by the end of March. If she loses – a more likely eventuality according to legal experts – she will probably need to bring in a parliamentary bill that will open up the Brexit process to scrutiny from lawmakers.

The case has attracted huge attention from markets, with investors hoping parliament will temper moves towards a “hard Brexit”, and it has again brought to the fore some of the ugly divisions among Britons produced by last June’s referendum.

Brexit supporters have cast the legal battle as an attempt by a pro-EU establishment to thwart the referendum result after Britons voted by 52-48 percent to leave the EU, with judges denounced as “enemies of the people” and Miller receiving death threats and a torrent of online abuse.

For the first time, all 11 judges of the Supreme Court sat on the panel for a four-day hearing in December, and David Neuberger, the president of the Supreme Court, said the issue was not about overturning the referendum result but how it should be legally implemented.

He will read out a short summary of the case with the verdict in a statement lasting little more than five minutes.

BREXIT PLANS

Last week May set out her stall for negotiations, promising a clean break with the world’s largest trading block as part of a 12-point plan to focus on global free trade deals, setting a course for a so-called “hard Brexit”.

Some investors and those who backed the “remain” campaign hope that lawmakers, most of whom wanted to stay in the EU, will force May to seek a deal which prioritises access to the European single market of 500 million people, or potentially even block Brexit altogether.

Analysts said sterling GBP=D4 would likely be lifted by a ruling against the government, though its gains would be limited as that outcome has already been largely priced in.

“I still think there is a lot to fight for,” public relations executive Roland Rudd, who heads the Open Britain group that wants to keep ties with the EU as close as possible, told Reuters last week.

“The prime minister has articulated her early view about the direction of travel, but how we get there, in what form and how it finally gets driven, is all up for discussion.”

While some in parliament remain strongly opposed to the path set by May, the main opposition Labour Party has said it would not block Article 50, and parliament’s House of Commons overwhelmingly backed a motion backing her timetable, in a non-binding vote in December.

“Given the strong vote in the Commons, we would certainly be hopeful that the March 31 deadline can be achieved,” a source from May’s Conservative party told Reuters.

Labour’s leader Jeremy Corbyn has said he would seek to amend any bill to ensure parliament can hold May to account. But he has also said he would not seek to delay triggering Article 50.

The small Liberal Democrat Party and Scottish nationalists, who are adamantly opposed to May’s Brexit plans, are likely to take the chance to cause difficulties for the government.

Further problems could lie in the unelected House of Lords upper chamber, with Liberal Democrat peers expected to try to block the bill. However, the government remains confident it will be passed.

While the thrust of the Supreme Court case centres on whether the British parliament has to give its assent, the judges also heard arguments from the Scottish government and lawyers for Northern Irish challengers that Britain’s devolved assemblies must give their approval too.

Should the court agree, an outcome ministers believe is unlikely, an ongoing political crisis in Northern Ireland could derail May’s timetable, following the collapse of the province’s power-sharing government.

Scotland’s parliament, with a nationalist administration, is also strongly opposed to Brexit.

(Editing by Guy Faulconbridge)

 

UK PM Theresa May accesed of acting like Henry VIII over Brexit — Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says refusing to commit to giving parliament a vote is beyond her cap[acity

December 29, 2016

Thu Dec 29, 2016 | 5:52am EST

Reuters

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May is acting like Tudor King Henry VIII in refusing to commit to giving parliament a vote on the deal to leave the European Union, opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said.

May told lawmakers earlier this month parliament would have “ample opportunity” to discuss her plans for Brexit but she stopped short of promising lawmakers a vote on any final agreement.

Corbyn told the Guardian newspaper on Thursday that any deal thrashed out between the British government and the 27 remaining countries in the European Union had to be endorsed by parliament.

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 Henry VIII — Art Gallery of Ontario

“It would have to come to parliament. She cannot hide behind Henry VIII and the divine rights of the power of kings on this one,” he said.

“The idea that on something as major as this the prime minister would use the royal prerogative to bypass parliament is extraordinary – I don’t know where she’s coming from.”

Henry VIII, who ruled from 1509 to 1547, is best known for his six wives and making himself head of the Church in England after breaking with Rome.

The British government is able in theory to take executive decisions without the assent of parliament using the “royal prerogative”, a concept originating in the personal power of the monarch to rule on his or her own initiative.

However, under Britain’s unwritten constitution, the scope of the prerogative is difficult to define and its use in specific cases has been decided by the courts.

May’s government is fighting a challenge to its decision to use prerogative powers to trigger Britain’s exit from the European Union.

The Supreme Court said earlier this month it would decide as quickly as possible whether May can lawfully invoke Article 50 without parliament’s assent, the first step in the process of leaving.a

(Reporting by Paul Sandle; Editing by Janet Lawrence)

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Jeremy Corbyn says PM ‘cannot hide behind Henry VIII and the divine rights … of kings’ on Brexit deal. Photograph by Jonathan Brady for PA

You’re not Henry VIII,’ Jeremy Corbyn tells Theresa May

Labour leader accuses prime minister of behaving like an overbearing Tudor by refusing to commit to Commons vote on Brexit deal

Jeremy Corbyn has accused Theresa May of behaving like Henry VIII or a similar autocratic monarch because of her refusal to commit to putting a final Brexit deal to a vote in parliament.

In an interview with the Guardian, the Labour leader insisted that the prime minister could not be allowed to use the royal prerogative to bypass the Commons over the UK’s future relationship with continental Europe.

Earlier this month, May repeatedly refused to commit to a parliamentary voteduring a select committee hearing – prompting Corbyn to conjure up an image of the prime minister acting as if she was an overbearing Tudor.

“It [a final Brexit deal] would have to come to parliament. She cannot hide behind Henry VIII and the divine rights of the power of kings on this one,” he said, pointing out that MEPs in the European parliament would have a vote on the proposed settlement.

“The idea that on something as major as this the prime minister would use the royal prerogative to bypass parliament is extraordinary – I don’t know where she’s coming from.”

Read the rest:

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/dec/28/jeremy-corbyn-you-are-not-henry-viii-theresa-may-brexit-deal-commons-vote

Obama: I Will Consider It An Insult To My Legacy If You Do Not Vote for Hillary (Legacy Is Really Not As Great As He Thinks)

September 18, 2016

President Obama made a strong sell for a candidate to succeed his legacy at the Congressional Black Caucus dinner Saturday night. The president invoked slavery and the Jim Crow era and preached that if they wanted to give him a good send off then register people to vote because his legacy is at stake.

Although he did not name Hillary Clinton, the president said he would consider it a personal insult from the African-American community if they did not for her.

“My name may not be on the ballot, but our progress is on the ballot,” President Obama said Saturday night. “And there is one candidate who will advance those things. And there is another candidate who’s defining principal, the central theme of his candidacy is opposition to all that we have done.”

“There’s no such thing as a vote that doesn’t matter,” Obama said. “It all matters. And after we have achieved historic turnout in 2008 and 2012, especially in the African-American community, I will consider it a personal insult, an insult to my legacy, if this community lets down it’s guard and fails to activate itself in this election. You want to give me a good send off? Go vote!”

Remarks:

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Our work’s not done. But if we are going to advance the cause of justice, and equality, and prosperity, and freedom, then we also have to acknowledge that even if we eliminated every restriction on voters, we would still have one of the lowest voting rates among free peoples. That’s not good, that is on us.

And I am reminded of all those folks who had to count bubbles in a bar of soap, beaten trying to register voters in Mississippi. Risked everything so that they could pull that lever. So, if I hear anybody saying their vote does not matter, that it doesn’t matter who we elect, read up on your history. It matters. We’ve got to get people to vote.

In fact, if you want to give Michelle and me a good sendoff, and that was a beautiful video, but don’t just watch us walk off into the sunset now, get people registered to vote. If you care about our legacy, realize everything we stand for is at stake, on the progress we have made is at stake in this election.

My name may not be on the ballot, but our progress is on the ballot. Tolerance is on the ballot. Democracy is on the ballot. Justice is on the ballot. Good schools are on the ballot. Ending mass incarceration, that’s on the ballot right now.

And there is one candidate who will advance those things. And there is another candidate who’s defining principal, the central theme of his candidacy is opposition to all that we have done.

There’s no such thing as a vote that doesn’t matter. It all matters. And after we have achieved historic turnout in 2008 and 2012, especially in the African-American community, I will consider it a personal insult, an insult to my legacy, if this community lets down it’s guard and fails to activate itself in this election. You want to give me a good send off? Go vote! And iI’m going to be working as hard as I can these next seven weeks to make sure folks do.

Hope is on the ballot. And fear is on the ballot too. Hope is on the ballot and fear is on the ballot too.

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What is Barack Obama’s Legacy? Are Black Americans better off than they were four years ago? Eight years ago? Is the world better off than it was eight years ago? Is the U.S. economy better off than it was eight years ago?
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Terrorism and Islamic jihad is increasing….
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Terrorism in the United States seems to be increasing….
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 (On the same day President Obama was boasting about his “legacy”)
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The U.S. Military needs to be rebuilt…..
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The U.S. Economy is “limping along”…..
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 (Read the Associated Press)

 (Experts say this has added to the “burden” the government places upon businesses.)

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American wages remain at 1997 levels as recovery fails to lift middle class
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/sep/16/american-economy-wages-poverty-middle-class-census-bureau

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The potential achievements of Obamacare are outweighed by the costs….
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President Obama’s (and Hillary Clinton’s) Iran Nuclear Deal further emboldened Iran which has become a greater threat to U.S. allies Israel and Saudi Arabia….
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Black on Black Murder and other Crimes of Violence are on the Rise…..
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“There is a shocking epidemic of heroin overdoses in black inner cities.
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Black Americans are either killing each other, or killing themselves in record numbers. (From the article above)
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Violence against U.S. Law Enforcement Officers Seems To Be On The Rise……
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Syria and other Middle East nations are in Severe Trouble….
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During the Obama Presidency, the world witnessed a migration of people as large as migration during World War II — The migration has destabilized Europe, contributed to Britain’s exit from the European Union and added hundreds of thousands of new refugees to the world…. The migration became a torrent after President Obama failed to enforce his “red line” for chemical weapons in Syria
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Gains in respect for human rights are being rolled back in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, the Philippines, Southeast Asia and China….
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China has “Militarized” the South China Sea despite Xi Jinping’s promise to President Obama that he would not do that and in violation of international law…
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Russia invaded Crimea (which it still holds) and parts of Ukraine (which it still holds)
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North Korea is perfecting nuclear weapons and the long range ballistic missiles to deliver them in an attack on Japan, South Korea, U.S. bases in Asia and even the U.S. homeland….
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Europe says it needs more military…..
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Hillary Clinton’s Legacy….
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Hillary Clinton and Vladimir Putin. After this photo was taken, Mr. Putin annexed Crimea and “invaded” eastern Ukraine and got America’s uranium….
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Hillary Clinton — Then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, testifying before a congressional committee investigating the deaths of four Americans at Benghazi, Libya, on September 11, 2012. Reuters photo by Kevin LaMarque
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I wish we could speak to Ambassador Chris Stevens, Glen Doherty, Tyrone Woods and Sean Smith who died in the September 11, 2012 attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi,  Libya.
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They would surely tell us: “Hillary Clinton did not have our back.”
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That’s why they are dead.
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Benghazi From left Glen Doherty, Tyrone Woods and Sean Smith died in the recent attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Libya.

Image: Hillary Rodham Clinton testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 23, 2013

Somebody must have told Hillary Rodham Clinton that her best defense on Benghazi was a good offense. She verbally attacked the Congressional lawmakers who have oversight over the U.S. Department of State — while she was Secretary of State.

Photo caption (Above) : Hillary Clinton testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 23, 2013, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP, file

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While Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton began what was called the “U.S. pivot to Asia.” In this photo, Hillary Clinton talks with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi. on September 5, 2012. Today Hillary Clinton is running to become the next President of the United States and China’s former Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi has been promoted to the number three leadership within the Chinese Communist Party. China seems to be in control of most of the South China Sea and is pressuring all U.S. allies from Japan to Australia to Singapore to ally themselves with China or face consequences. Even long-time u.S. ally the Philippines seems to have gone over to the China side…  In 2012, Hillary Clinton was a big advocate of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). After Donald Trump said the TPP was not a good deal for American workers, Hillary Clinton became against the TPP.
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Those were fun times, weren’t they?  U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov press a red button symbolizing Mrs. Clinton’s  intention to “reset” U.S.-Russian relations during their meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, March 6, 2009. Only the Clinton State Department Used the word for “overcharge” instead of the word for ‘reset.” U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton left her post as U.S. Secretary of State with a Russia in military resurgence. The button meant “Reset to the Soviet Union and the Cold War” to Putin’s Moscow government, we suppose. (AP Photo)

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Britain: Out of The European Union
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President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrive at a campaign at the Charlotte Convention Center in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, July 5, 2016. Obama is spending the afternoon campaigning for Clinton. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Obama: Would be ‘personal insult’ to his legacy if black voters don’t back Clinton
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By Jeff Zeleny, Dan Merica and MJ Lee CNN
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WASHINGTON (CNN) — President Barack Obama delivered an impassioned plea to the African-American community Saturday night to help stop Donald Trump, saying he would consider it a “personal insult” to his legacy if black voters didn’t turn out for Hillary Clinton.

Addressing the Congressional Black Caucus gala for the last time as president, Obama warned that while his name would not be on the ballot in November, all of the progress that the country has made over the last eight years were on the line.

“If I hear anybody saying their vote does not matter, that it doesn’t matter who we elect — read up on your history. It matters. We’ve got to get people to vote,” Obama said. “I will consider it a personal insult — an insult to my legacy — if this community lets down its guard and fails to activate itself in this election. You want to give me a good sendoff? Go vote.”

Obama’s speech — coming less than two months away from Election Day — marked some of his harshest words yet about Trump, as well as his most forceful call on the black community to get behind Clinton.

His remarks also had lighter moments — particularly as he addressed the so-called “birther” controversy. The second-term president began his speech by remarking: “There’s an extra spring in my step tonight. I don’t know about you guys, but I am so relieved that the whole ‘birther’ thing is over.”

Chuckling, the President said, “I mean: ISIL, North Korea, poverty, climate change — none of those things weighed on my mind like the validity of my birth certificate. And to think: that with just a 124 days to go, under the wire, we got that resolved.”

Obama was referring to Trump’s admission this week that the president was born in the United States. Trump has long supported the birther theory, raising questions about Obama’s birthplace and demanding that the president present his birth certificate as proof of his origin.

Obama’s tone, however, soon turned serious as he outlined what he said was at stake in the election.

“You may have heard Hillary’s opponent in this election say that there’s never been a worse time to be a black person. I mean, he missed that whole civics lesson about slavery or Jim Crow,” Obama said. “But we’ve got a museum for him to visit, so he can tune in. We will educate him.”

In harsh rebuke of Trump, Obama referred to the businessman as “somebody who has fought against civil rights and fought against equality and who has shown no regard for working people most of his life.”

On Trump’s quest to win over African-American voters, Obama quipped: “Well, we do have challenges, but we’re not stupid.”

Clinton lauds Obama

Speaking moments before the president, Clinton lauded Obama and also took on the birther controversy that has been swirling.

“Even when hateful nonsense is thrown their way, Barack, Michelle, their two beautiful daughters have represented our country with class, grace and integrity,” said Clinton, who served as Obama’s secretary of state.

She added, “Mr. President, not only do we know you are an American, you are a great American.”

Clinton, who accepted the group’s “Trailblazer Award” on Saturday night for becoming the first female presidential candidate for a major political party, nodded to Trump when she said that the choice in November “is not about golf course promotions or birth certificates, it comes down to who will fight for the forgotten.”

“We can’t let Barack Obama’s legacy fall into the hands of someone who doesn’t understand that, whose dangerous divisive vision for our country will drag us backwards,” she said, though she never mentioned Trump’s name.

Obamas stumping for Clinton

Clinton’s campaign is relying on the Obamas to help persuade the coalition of minorities, young people and women who propelled them to the White House to cast ballots for this year’s Democratic candidate. The President made his first solo appeal this week, appearing at a campaign rally in Philadelphia and phoning in to African-American radio to talk up Clinton.

“I get frustrated hearing folks say, ‘You know, we’re so excited with Barack, we love Michelle, they take Hillary for granted,'” Obama told syndicated host Frankie Darcell. “This is not a reality show. This is not something where it’s all flash and fizzle.”

On Friday, First Lady Michelle Obama made her first campaign appearance of 2016, trying to convince her and her husband’s supporters at a Virginia rally that Clinton is also worthy of their votes.

“When I hear folks saying they’re not inspired this this election, I disagree. I am inspired,” she said, urging the crowd to register to vote and actually cast ballots for Clinton.