Posts Tagged ‘China Daily’

‘Read this quickly before it’s gone’: how China’s media covered or ignored the arrest of Huawei executive

December 7, 2018

Logo von Huawei (Reuters/H. Hanschke)

Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper reported on Wednesday that Meng Wanzhou (孟晚舟), the daughter of the founder of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, Ren Zhengfei (任正非), had been arrested in Canada and faces extradition to the United States on charges of violating US trade sanctions on Iran.

Meng is also the deputy chair of Huawei, which in recent months has faced an international backlash over concerns the company is linked to the Chinese state and poses a security risk.

Meng Wanzhou

Meng Wanzhou. File photo: Huawei.

Little information is available about Meng’s arrest, which reportedly occurred on December 1. Ian McLeod, a spokesman for Canada’s Justice Department, told the Globe and Mail: “As there is a publication ban in effect, we cannot provide any further detail at this time. The ban was sought by Ms Meng.”

So far, Chinese mainstream media have been largely silent on the case. A handful of media have picked up an early news release from the official China News Service that closely follows the press release from the Chinese Embassy in Canada.

That release registered a strong protest, saying that Meng’s arrest had “seriously harmed the human rights of the victim.”

The China Daily, published by the Information Office of the State Council, released an article in Chinese earlier today quoting the official release from Huawei saying that Meng has done nothing wrong and they are confident there will be a fair result.

Huawei Canada

Huawei, Canada. Photo: Wikicommons.

The official Xinhua News Agency did not release a report in English until around 5PM today Beijing time. That report again closely followed the remarks from the Chinese Embassy in Canada and the official Huawei release.

As of 8:30PM Beijing time there was still no Xinhua story in Chinese carried prominently on the service’s website, though far down the list of news was a transcript of the foreign ministry press conference.

Xinhua was focussed instead on Xi Jinping’s trip to Spain, Portugal and Latin America, and on the 40th anniversary of China’s “reform and opening” policy.

No doubt the timing of the Meng Wanzhou story, coming less than two weeks ahead of the formal anniversary on December 18, will also be a point of great sensitivity for the Party leadership.

Xinhua

Xinhua homepage, December 6 2018. Photo: Screenshot.

There were also stories on both the Chinese and English sides of Caixin. Interestingly, though, while the English report is prominent, the Chinese report was pushed lower down at around 4pm Beijing time, emphasising in the headline the fierce response from the Chinese Embassy in Canada — and two hours later that story was not visible at all on the Chinese homepage.

The English-language page at Caixin gave the Meng Wanzhou arrest story central play, and by 5pm Beijing time also paired it with the story of Huawei’s troubles in the UK.

The Chinese homepage of Caixin at around 4pm Beijing time on December 6 showed the Huawei story of the arrest of Meng Wanzhou well below other featured articles.

By 5pm Beijing time on the same day, no stories about Huawei or its CFO, Meng Wanzhou, were visible on the Chinese-language Caixin homepage.

Caixin

The English-language page at Caixin gives the Meng Wanzhou arrest story central play, and by 5PM Beijing time also pairs it with the story of Huawei’s troubles in the UK. Photo: Screenshot.

But lack of information on this breaking story, and relative silence from traditional and state-run media cannot forestall the conversation in China. There has been a flurry of chatter and speculation on Weibo and WeChat, although of course, that conversation is in a state of constant emergence and disappearance.

Here, courtesy of the Weiboscope, are a few of the more recent Weibo posts that have been removed, most dealing directly with the original report from the Globe and Mail:

  • 2018-12-06 13:29:55 | #ImmigrantObserver # MengWanzhou (Sabrina Wanzhou Meng) born 1972, is the daughter of Huawei founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei, and Meng Dongbo (孟东波), the father of her mother, Meng Jun (孟军), served as deputy governor of Sichuan province. She at the very least has Chinese, American and Canadian passports!
  • 2018-12-06 07:31:11 | [Meng Wanzhou, Daughter of Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei, arrested in Canada] Canada’s Global and Mail newspaper reported that the daughter of Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei, Huawei’s CFO Meng Wanzhou, has been arrested in Canada and faces extradition to the U.S. American law enforcement authorities have said that Meng Wanzhou is suspected of violating U.S. trade sanctions against Iran. http://t.cn/EyXG9Ao
  • 2018-12-06 07:24:50 | [Foreign Media: Ren Zhengfei’s daughter and Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou has been arrested in Vancouver] News, Beijing time, December 6. According to Canada’s Globe and Mail, quoting Ian McLeod of Canada’s Justice Department, Canada has arrested Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou. http://t.cn/EyXbNi9

Marco Rubio

@marcorubio

If @Huawei has been helping violate US sanctions by transferring US technology to they should be barred from operating in the US or from purchasing US technology.

488 people are talking about this

A Weibo search for “Meng Wanzhou” directs readers to two posts from state media, one from CCTV Online and the other from the Global Times. The CCTV post is a short video relaying the response from China’s Foreign Ministry, calling on Canada and the U.S. to immediate release Meng and to “protect the legitimate rights of the person involved.”

The Global Times post similarly focuses on what at present seems right now to be the core message of the leadership: Meng must be immediately released.

The battle by ordinary citizens and other non-official voices to have a say on the Meng case, over and against the official urge to control the development of the issue online, could be glimpsed openly on social media.

In a post made around 8:30pm to Weibo, Zhu Wei (朱伟), an entrepreneur with more than two million followers on the platform, posted the following message:

“This topic is so sensitive. The headline article on my WeChat public account ‘Teacher Zhu Wei’ (朱伟老师), ‘Chinese Embassy in Canada: We Demand the Immediate Return of Meng Wanzhou’s Freedom’ was deleted by the relevant departments. Right now I’m reposting it on Weibo, so read it really quickly before it’s gone.”

Huawei phone

Photo: Kārlis Dambrāns/Flickr.

In a Weibo post, entrepreneur Zhu Wei tells readers to quickly read his post already deleted from the WeChat platform — before it once again disappears.

The article in question by Zhu Wei, offered a rundown of the official statements from the foreign ministry and from Huawei, and then included a paragraph by paragraph translation of the original report from the Globe and Mail.

Another post from the Weibo account of the Putian Media Group (莆田广播电视台) offered readers a video from talk Meng Wanzhou gave in English on September 26 at the World Academic Summit in Singapore.

The post, which bore the hashtag “#MengWanZhouArrested,” noted that Meng’s talk had been about “how to promote industry innovation.” But the video was soon disabled, yielding the message: “We’re sorry, this video cannot be displayed. Please view another video.”

Some commenting on WeChat and other platforms voiced anger over Meng’s arrest, viewing it through the lens of US-China competition, as a provocative act and a sign that the United States and other Western countries want to keep China down, even stripping it of its “right to develop.”

Wechat

File photo: Sinchen.Lin/Flickr.

In a piece shared widely on WeChat, Mei Xinyu (梅新育), a financial writer with more than one million followers on Weibo, wrote:

“Finally, I want to emphasise again the assessment I had a few days ago: through equal and rational dialogue a new cold war between China and the US can be avoided, and this would be a great thing for both countries and for the world.

“But the sky rains when it wants to, and girls marry when the time comes, and if certain people insist on foisting a ‘new cold war’ upon us, China has sufficient courage to meet this challenge, upholding China’s right to development in the midst of this struggle.”

Republished with permission from the China Media Project. 

https://www.hongkongfp.com/2018/12/07/read-quickly-gone-chinas-media-covered-ignored-arrest-huawei-executive/

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Taiwan leader’s ‘separatist stance’ cost election: Chinese media

November 26, 2018

 

Chinese state-run media on Monday blamed the electoral defeat of Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen’s party on her “separatist stance”, saying it must make an “about-face” on ties with the mainland.

Tsai resigned as head of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) after it was dealt a massive loss in city and county seats during Saturday’s wide-ranging vote in self-ruled and democratic Taiwan.

The main opposition Kuomintang (KMT), which oversaw an unprecedented thaw with Beijing before Tsai took office in 2016, made gains in the face of China’s increasing pressure on the island, which it considers as part of its territory to be reunified.

© AFP/File | China has blamed the ‘separatist stance’ of Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen for her party’s massive electoral losses

The state-run China Daily said Taiwan’s people are unhappy the government has not pulled the island out of quasi-economic stagnation and that its policies “have ignored the interests of many groups”.

“The Tsai administration’s secessionist stance has not only soured its crucial relations with the Chinese mainland, but also made it unpopular with people on both sides of the straits,” the daily said in an editorial.

“The election shows that the Tsai administration has betrayed Taiwan’s interests and become a troublemaker whose actions have drifted farther away from the practical needs of the Taiwan people and the historical truth of the consensus there is only one China.”

Cross-Strait communication and cooperation between local governments are now expected to strengthen following the election, it added.

The DPP is traditionally pro-independence and Tsai has refused to acknowledge Beijing’s stance that Taiwan is part of “one China”, unlike her KMT predecessor Ma Ying-jeou.

Beijing has sought to punish Tsai and the DPP by ramping up military drills, poaching allies and successfully persuading international businesses, including airlines, to list the island as part of China on their websites.

“Radical thinking and paranoia that permeates the green camp have misguided the DPP,” the nationalistic Global Times said in an editorial.

“The party needs to reflect on this failure and make an about-face on its stance… (on) cross-Strait ties.”

AFP

Trade War: Chinese propaganda hits US heartland

October 21, 2018

China’s propaganda machine has taken aim at American soybean farmers as part of its high-stakes trade war with the Trump administration.

The publication last month of a four-page advertising section in the Des Moines Register opened a new battle line in China’s effort to break the administration’s resolve. U.S. farmers are a key political constituency for Trump, and Beijing has imposed tariffs on American soybeans as retaliation for Trump’s tariffs on hundreds of billions in Chinese imports.

China regularly disseminates propaganda in the West through its China Daily newspaper to try to influence public opinion in the United States and elsewhere. But the advertorial in the Register was unusual for deploying not a national publication in New York or Washington but a newspaper in the farm state of Iowa.

Mr. Trump said in an address to the United Nations Security Council in September that China was interfering in the U.S. midterm elections.

“Regrettably, we found that China has been attempting to interfere in our upcoming 2018 election, coming up in November, against my administration,” Mr. Trump said. “They do not want me, or us, to win because I am the first president ever to challenge China on trade.”

“We don’t want to them to meddle or interfere in our upcoming election,” he said.

China regularly disseminates propaganda in the West through its China Daily newspaper to try to influence public opinion. But the advertorial in the Register was unusual for deploying not a national publication in New York or Washington but a newspaper in the farm state of Iowa.

“It’s the first time I’ve ever seen anything like this in a heartland city,” said Matt Schrader, who edits the China Brief newsletter for the Jamestown Foundation, a Washington research institute that monitors China’s actions.

China Woos US Farm Belt

This Friday, Oct. 19, 2018, photo shows a copy of the four-page advertising section Chinawatch along with a copy of The Des Moines Register in Des Moines, Iowa.

 CHARLIE NEIBERGALL/AP

The Iowa newspaper section was explicitly labeled a product of China Daily, China’s official English language newspaper. The articles were clearly geared to try to soften the image of China and its president, Xi Jinping. With headlines ranging from “Dispute: Fruit of a president’s folly” and “Book tells of Xi’s fun days in Iowa” to Kung Fu skill helps light up life path” and “China seeks pacts on robotics,” the message was a not-very-subtle one about the friendly way Beijing wants to be seen in the farm belt.

Ken Doctor, a longtime media analyst, noted that newspapers have been struggling to replace revenue lost from declining subscriptions and print advertisements moving online. He suggested that when publications run propaganda like the “China Watch” sections, they should take care to be fully explicit about the source.

“I’d like to see newspapers that run this include an editor’s note to be transparent about what this is,” said Doctor, who runs the Newsonomics website.

Many experts say they doubt the propaganda drive in the United States will likely succeed. Chinese officials are used to operating at home, where the central government controls all major media outlets.

“U.S. farmers and manufacturers are smart enough to understand their self-interest,” said Elizabeth Economy of the Council on Foreign Relations. “They don’t need a Chinese newspaper insert to tell them how to think about the relationship between tariffs and their exports to China.”

Stanley Chao, a business consultant who has written a book called “Selling to China,” said it’s not entirely surprising that China would try to take its trade arguments directly to American farmers, whose crops have been hit by Beijing’s retaliatory tariffs.

“This is the norm for the Chinese propaganda machine,” Chao said.

Chao noted that when a Chinese dissident won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize — chosen by the Norwegian Nobel Committee and an embarrassment for Beijing — China responded by placing propaganda ads in Scandinavian newspapers.

In addition to its connection to the tariffs China imposed on American soybeans and other crops, Iowa is also home to Terry Branstad, a former governor of the state who is now the U.S. ambassador to Beijing. And in the past, President Xi has visited Iowa, whose caucuses serve as the first contest in every presidential election year.

Mr. Trump tweeted a photo of the “China Watch” edition that ran in the Register, calling it propaganda and asserting that Beijing was trying to interfere in U.S. elections.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

China is actually placing propaganda ads in the Des Moines Register and other papers, made to look like news. That’s because we are beating them on Trade, opening markets, and the farmers will make a fortune when this is over!

Chinese officials defended the advertising section and said it didn’t violate any U.S. laws. Geng Shuang, a spokesman for the foreign ministry, said the Chinese government doesn’t interfere in other countries’ internal affairs or elections.

“I think there has been a long-standing effort to influence Americans across the United States,” said Sarah Cook, a research analyst with the Freedom House watchdog group. “Just this particular form of influence — the China Watch paid supplement — may only be appearing in places like Iowa now.”

Other countries, like Saudi Arabia and Taiwan, typically hire public relations firms and place ads to try to improve their images, in contrast to China’s more direct approach of placing ads in newspapers or posting videos online. The 2016 elections brought attention to foreign influence after U.S. intelligence agencies concluded that Russia had meddled in the elections. Federal prosecutors have charged a Russian firm with interfering through bogus Facebook posts.

It’s not yet clear whether or how much Beijing will continue to try to shape public sentiment in the farm belt states.

“I imagine we will see some additional efforts by the Chinese government to directly influence public opinion in the heartland,” said Walter Hutchens, a global business professor at the University of Redlands in California. “However, it seems more likely their economic muscle, rather than their clumsy PR efforts, will have actual impact.”

Associated Press and CBS

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/chinas-propaganda-machine-takes-aim-at-american-soybean-farmers/

Britain’s South China Sea ‘provocation’ puts post-Brexit trade talks at risk, China says

September 7, 2018

Editorial in state-run China Daily says decision to send warship past disputed Paracel Islands could hamper talks on post-EU free-trade deal

PUBLISHED : Friday, 07 September, 2018, 11:31am
UPDATED : Friday, 07 September, 2018, 11:59am

A British Royal Navy warship that sailed close to islands in the South China Sea claimed by China risked hampering any talks about a free-trade agreement after Britain leaves the European Union, a major Chinese state-run newspaper said on Friday.

China and Britain agreed last month to look at the possibility of reaching a “top notch” post-Brexit free-trade deal which, if struck, would be an important political win for Britain’s Conservative government.

“China and the UK had agreed to actively explore the possibility of discussing a free-trade agreement after Brexit. Any act that harms China’s core interests will only put a spanner in the works,” the official China Daily newspaper said in an editorial.

Britain has long courted China for a post-Brexit trade deal and talked up a “golden era” in ties, although any formal talks could not begin until Britain officially leaves the European Union next year and typically take many years to conclude.

The HMS Albion, a 22,000-tonne amphibious warfare vessel, sailed near the Paracel Islands claimed by China last month, Reuters reported on Thursday, prompting an angry reaction from China which called it a “provocation”.

The Paracels are occupied entirely by China but also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan.

China’s claims in the South China Sea, through which some US$3 trillion of shipborne trade passes each year, are contested by Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam. Britain does not have any territorial claims in the area.

The China Daily article said Britain was trying to “curry favour” with the United States, which has been pushing for more international participation in freedom of navigation operations in the strategic waterway.

“Now that it is eyeing the US as an economic lifeline after it exits the European Union – the United Kingdom is no doubt eager to seize whatever opportunity it can to get into Washington’s good books,” the English-language newspaper said.

China’s Defence Ministry said in its statement responding to the Royal Navy action that, with the joint efforts of China and Southeast Asian countries, the situation in the South China Sea had stabilised.

“Certain countries from outside the region pay no heed to this, and send military ships and aircraft to the South China Sea to foment trouble, creating problems where none exist, threatening regional peace and stability,” it said.

China has repeatedly denounced what it views as interference from “countries outside the region” in the South China Sea, generally a message to the United States and its allies to stay out of the dispute.

Reuters and SCMP

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/article/2163159/britains-south-china-sea-provocation-puts-post-brexit-trade

Related:

[China’s seizure of much of the South China Sea was a violation of international law much like Russia’s moves on Crimea and Ukraine]

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China says it has sovereignty over all the South China Sea north of its “nine dash line.” On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration  in The Hague said this claim by China was not valid. But China and the Philippine government then chose to ignore international law. Vietnam has been unable to develop its own undersea oil due to China’s aggressive behavior.

Chinese Media, Eager for Trade War With Trump, Says “Only Fools Build Walls”

June 16, 2018

Image may contain: mountain, sky, outdoor and nature

BBC News

Chinese media have mocked US President Donald Trump over plans to impose 25% tariffs on $50bn worth of Chinese goods, saying “wise men build bridges but fools build walls”.

Mr Trump announced the tariffs on Friday, accusing Beijing of intellectual copyright theft.

China retaliated, saying it would impose an additional 25% tariff on 659 US goods worth $50bn.

Stock markets fell after the announcements amid fear of a trade war.

The US had earlier warned that it will impose even more tariffs should China retaliate.

Mr Trump said the tariffs were “essential to preventing further unfair transfers of American technology and intellectual property to China, which will protect American jobs.”

The Chinese product lines that have been hit range from aircraft tyres to turbines and commercial dishwashers.

State-controlled media made a concerted attack on the new US measures.

“Following the path of expanding and opening up is China’s best response to the trade dispute between China and the United States, and is also the responsibility that major countries should have to the world,” said an editorial in Xinhua news agency.

“The wise man builds bridges, the fool builds walls,” it commented.

Social media users were quick to make light of the comment, with many making reference to the Great Wall of China.

Presentational white space

Elsewhere official Communist Party newspaper the People’s Daily condemned what it described as the US administration’s “obsession with playing the disgraceful role of global economic disruptor”.

The Global Times, meanwhile, said Mr Trump was disrupting the world order to appeal to voters who think he’s fighting for them.

However, the English-language China Daily said it hoped the worst could still be avoided.

“Given the frequent flip-flopping of the Donald Trump administration, it is still too early to conclude that a trade war will start,” it said.

The media response came as China announced tariffs on $34bn of US goods including agricultural products, cars and marine products which will also take effect from 6 July.

Tariffs on other US goods will be announced at a later date, Xinhua said.

Media captionHow hogs and Harleys became weapons in a looming trade war.

US tariffs that affect more than 800 Chinese products worth $34bn in annual trade are due to come into effect on 6 July.

The White House said it would consult on tariffs on the other $16bn of products, and would apply these later.

The US wants China to stop practices that allegedly encourage transfer of intellectual property – design and product ideas – to Chinese companies, such as requirements that foreign firms share ownership with local partners to access the Chinese market.

However, many economists and businesses in the US say the tariffs are likely to hurt some of the sectors the administration is trying to protect, which depend on China for parts or assembly.

The US announced plans for tariffs this spring, after an investigation into China’s intellectual property practices.

It published a draft list of about 1,300 Chinese products slated for tariffs in April. The list released on Friday is slightly shorter, incorporating feedback and criticism received in the ensuing weeks.

The plans have elicited a mixed political reaction, drawing praise from Democrats and opposition from Republicans, who typically favour free trade policies.

Goods impacted by tariffs

Chinese state newspaper says Trump trade probe will ‘poison’ relations

August 14, 2017

BEIJING (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump’s order to his top trade adviser to investigate supposedly unfair Chinese trade practices will “poison” relations between the two countries, a Chinese state-run newspaper said on Monday.

Trump will later on Monday issue the order to determine whether to investigate Chinese trade practices that force U.S. firms operating in China to turn over intellectual property, senior administration officials said on Saturday.

The move, which could eventually lead to steep tariffs on Chinese goods, comes at a time when Trump has asked China to do more to crack down on North Korea’s nuclear missile program as he threatens possible military action against Pyongyang.

Trump has said he would be more amenable to going easy on Beijing if it were more aggressive in reining in North Korea.

In an editorial, the official China Daily said it was critical the Trump administration doesn’t make a rash decision it will regret.

“Given Trump’s transactional approach to foreign affairs, it is impossible to look at the matter without taking into account his increasing disappointment at what he deems as China’s failure to bring into line the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” the English-language paper said.

“But instead of advancing the United States’ interests, politicising trade will only acerbate the country’s economic woes, and poison the overall China-U.S. relationship.”

An administration official has insisted diplomacy over North Korea and the potential trade probe were “totally unrelated”, saying the trade action was not a pressure tactic.

The China Daily said it was unfair for Trump to put the burden on China for dissuading Pyongyang from its actions.

“By trying to incriminate Beijing as an accomplice in the DPRK’s nuclear adventure and blame it for a failure that is essentially a failure of all stakeholders, Trump risks making the serious mistake of splitting up the international coalition that is the means to resolve the issue peacefully,” it said.

“Hopefully Trump will find another path. Things will become even more difficult if Beijing and Washington are pitted against each other.”

Chinese Newspaper Warns Trump Risks ‘Trade War’

August 14, 2017

BEIJING — A Chinese state newspaper warned Monday that President Donald Trump “could trigger a trade war” if he goes ahead with plans to launch an investigation of whether China is stealing U.S. technology.

In a commentary by a researcher at a Commerce Ministry think tank, the China Daily said Trump’s possible decision to launch an investigation, which an official says he will announce Monday, could “intensify tensions,” especially over intellectual property.

The official told reporters Saturday the president would order his trade office to look into whether to launch an investigation under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 of possible Chinese theft of U.S. technology and intellectual property.

The Chinese government has yet to comment on the announcement.

Image result for patent and trademark office, signage

A decision to use the Trade Act to rebalance trade with China “could trigger a trade war,” said the commentary under the name of researcher Mei Xinyu of the ministry’s International Trade and Economic Cooperation Institute.

“And the inquiry the U.S. administration has ordered into China’s trade policies, if carried out, could intensify tensions, especially on intellectual property rights.”

The commentary gave no indication of how Beijing might respond but Chinese law gives regulators broad discretion over what foreign companies can do in China.

If an investigation begins, Washington could seek remedies either through the World Trade Organization or outside of it.

Previous U.S. actions directed at China under the 1974 law had little effect, said the China Daily. It noted China has grown to become the biggest exporter and has the world’s largest foreign exchange reserves.

“The use of Section 301 by the U.S. will not have much impact on China’s progress toward stronger economic development and a better future,” said the newspaper.

Related:

China may be developing new long-range air-to-air missile as seen on J-11B fighter

January 27, 2017

Reuters

Thu Jan 26, 2017 | 12:32am EST

China may be testing a new, long-range air-to-air missile that could take out early warning aircraft and aerial refueling aircraft, a state-run newspaper said on Thursday, after pictures of the new missile surfaced online.

President Xi Jinping is overseeing an ambitious military modernization program that includes stealth jets and aircraft carriers. The country has also tested anti-satellite missiles.

The official China Daily said the People’s Liberation Army had recently posted pictures online of a J-11B fighter carrying a large, unidentified missile during drills last year.

Air force researcher Fu Qianshao told the newspaper he believed the missile was designed to hit distant high-value targets, such as early warning aircraft, normally outside actual combat zones.

That represents an improved capability over existing Chinese missiles, which have ranges of less than 100 km (62 miles).

“The best solution to this problem I can figure out is to send a super-manoeuvrable fighter jet with very long-range missiles to destroy those high-value targets, which are the ‘eyes’ of enemy jets,” Fu said.

“So the successful development of this potential new missile would be a major breakthrough.”

The missile may even have an actual range of 400 km (249 miles), exceeding those used by Western air forces, and dive down on targets from the stratosphere, he added.

The air force has yet to formally comment on the new missile.

Chinese state media periodically report on new weapons before there is official confirmation of their existence.

The military modernization comes as China has rattled nerves around the region with increasingly assertive moves to bolster its sovereignty claims in the South China Sea and over Taiwan, which it regards as a breakaway province.

China’s first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, recently sailed around the self-ruled island in what China called a routine drill, but which prompted Taiwan to scramble fighter jets and navy ships.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

*************************************************

Image may contain: sky and airplane

A J-11B twin-engine fighter jet carrying a large missile leads to speculation of a new air-to-air missile.

PLA may have new air-to-air missile

By Zhao Lei | China Daily USA | Updated: 2017-01-26 07:57

An image released online by the Chinese Air Force has led to speculation that the military is testing a beyond-visual-range, air-to-air missile in combat drills.

The photo, recently uploaded to the People’s Liberation Army website, shows a J-11B twin-engine fighter jet carrying a large missile – it stretches about one-fourth of the length of the 22-meter-long aircraft – during Red Sword 2016, an aerial warfare exercise over a northwestern desert in November.

Nearly 100 aircraft as well as air defense and electronic countermeasure units from two theater commands participated in the exercise, the Air Force said.

It comes after photographs circulated on weapons websites late last year of a Chinese J-16 strike fighter carrying a nearly identical missile.

A spokesman for the Air Force was unavailable for comment on Wednesday, and no official introduction of the potential new weapon has been disclosed by the PLA or defense contractors. However, its appearance has attracted attention from military enthusiasts, many of whom say such a missile would boost the Air Force’s combat capabilities.

Chinese fighter jets currently use the PL-11 and PL-12 missiles to attack long-distance targets, but their maximum ranges are shorter than 100 kilometers.

Fu Qianshao, an equipment researcher with the PLA Air Force, said on Tuesday that he believes China has developed a new missile that can hit high-value targets such as early-warning planes and aerial refueling aircraft, which stay far from conflict zones.

Most air-to-air missiles in service around the world have a maximum range of around 100 km, while a handful of new types propelled by ramjets can reach 200 km, he said. However, all of them are unsuitable for combating early-warning planes because of their short ranges.

Moreover, he added, long-range ground-to-air missiles are restricted by their fixed deployment when dealing with planes far away.

“The best solution to this problem I can figure out is to send a super-maneuverable fighter jet with very-long-range missiles to destroy those high-value targets, which are ‘eyes’ of enemy jets,” Fu said. “So the successful development of this potential new missile would be a major breakthrough in the Air Force’s weapons upgrade.”

He said the missile could have a maximum range of 400 km, farther than any air-to-air missiles used by Western air forces. He added that based on his experience, an ultralong-range missile would enter the the stratosphere – at an altitude of 20 to 50 km – and continue its flight there until it detects its target and dives to strike.

In addition, its size would enable it to be equipped with a large, cutting-edge guidance radar to detect targets. All of these capabilities would allow it to deal with large planes and stealth jets, Fu added.

Wang Ya’nan, editor-in-chief of Aerospace Knowledge magazine, said he has been unable to verify the missile in the PLA picture. However, he suggested that the superlong range of such a missile would mean it could use satellites to relay data and control signals.

The United States’ longest-range air-to-air missile is the AIM-120D, which has an operational range of up to 200 km. Russia also has the R-37 and K-100 air-to-air missiles, which their designers say have operational ranges of up to 400 km.

zhaolei@chinadaily.com.cn(China Daily USA 01/26/2017 page3)

China Slams Western Democracy as Flawed

January 23, 2017

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January 22, 2017, 5:00 PM EST January 23, 2017, 2:20 AM EST
  • Western democracies face looming crisis, party paper says
  • Trump’s current policies are giving China room to boost clout

China State Media Congratulates Trump

China’s state media used Donald Trump’s inauguration as U.S. president to warn about the perils of democracy, touting the relative stability of the Communist system as President Xi Jinping heads toward a twice-a-decade reshuffle of senior leadership posts.

With ministries and senior officials stressing unity as a priority for China, smoothing the path for the party’s congress in the fourth quarter, state media were quick to highlight divisions within America shown by Trump’s elevation, without necessarily directly referencing the new president.

Democracy has reached its limits, and deterioration is the inevitable future of capitalism, according to the People’s Daily, the flagship paper of China’s Communist Party. It devoted an entire page on Sunday to critiquing Western democracies, quoting former Chairman Mao Zedong’s 1949 poem asking people to “range far your eyes over long vistas” and saying the ultimate defeat of capitalism would enable Communism to emerge victorious.

The unusual series of commentaries in the People’s Daily mirrors Soviet efforts to promote an alternative political and economic system during the Cold War. The rise of anti-establishment, protectionist politicians like Trump, amid populist winds on several continents, has sent political parties scurrying to shore up their support, helping China to portray itself as relatively steady.

Xi has used recent speeches to international audiences to tout China’s economic and political values and has said that globalization, despite its flaws, should endure via the existing international system of finance and trade. And he’s signaled China will take a measured approach to any provocations by Trump on trade. That’s even as state media criticizes democracy and capitalism amid efforts to build support at home for the party.Read more: Xi preaches openness abroad while clamping down at home

“China’s rising wealth has brought greater global presence, but that’s not enough,” said Zhang Ming, a political science professor at Renmin University in Beijing. “The Communist leaders want that someday China will matter globally for the nature of its political system and create its own universal values.”

The commentaries came after Trump in his inauguration speech said his administration would focus on an “America first” approach to foreign policy, undermining hopes abroad that the new president would moderate his protectionist tone. His pledge to abandon a U.S.-led Pacific trade pact has helped China step in to advocate for an alternative Asia-wide deal.

A panoramic view of the 58th presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States today, in a celebration of American unity for a country that is anything but unified. Photographer: Ricky Carioti/Pool via Bloomberg

The presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 20.  Photographer: Ricky Carioti/Bloomberg

‘Reached Its Limits’

The official Xinhua News Agency congratulated Trump and said it hoped for “win-win” cooperation. An editorial in the state-backed China Daily said the countries should work toward “an updated, more desirable version of globalization.”

Still, the People’s Daily also used Trump’s inauguration weekend to tout the benefits of China’s political system. “The emergence of capitalism’s social crisis is the most updated evidence to show the superiority of socialism and Marxism,” it said.

“Western style democracy used to be a recognized power in history to drive social development. But now it has reached its limits,” said another article on the same page. “Democracy is already kidnapped by the capitals and has become the weapon for capitalists to chase profits.”

Xi during his term has called for strengthened confidence in China’s communist system. Most recently, China’s top judge called on his cohorts to “absolutely not fall into the trap of false Western ideas” such as judicial independence, separation of powers and constitutionalism.

Rule of Law

Trump’s policies are giving China a chance to take a bigger global role, said Zhang.

“China doesn’t have a better Communist system than it used to have, but the global economic and political turmoil has undermined public confidence in western democracy,” he said.

Still, China faces several difficulties, including questions about its rule of law and own governance among foreign companies operating there. While it has gained greater military and economic clout in Asia, it is also embroiled in territorial disputes in the East China Sea and South China Sea that have undercut its efforts to build its soft power in the region.

For Xi there is also the risk of a trade war with the Trump administration and a dispute over China’s currency, Li Daokui, a former adviser to the People’s Bank of China, said at a forum in Beijing in December at Tsinghua University.

“There will be several rounds of battles and China needs to be ready to think about solutions in areas that he may initiate battles,” said Li, now a professor at Tsinghua. “I believe China is ready for the battles. Without going through the wars, it’s impossible for other nations to respect China’s stance, and it’s impossible for China to become a global leader.”

— With assistance by Rosalind Mathieson, and Keith Zhai

https://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2017-01-22/china-slams-western-democracy-as-flawed-as-trump-takes-office

‘What if he did the job?’ Newspapers around the world dedicate their front pages to Donald Trump’s presidential debut

January 21, 2017

  • French newspaper Le Figaro dedicated its magazine edition to Donald Trump
  • Conservative paper chose to outline ‘the assets of an unpredictable president’
  • Some of the world’s most prominent papers featured Trump on their front page
  • The Independent in the UK wrote: ‘So help us God’ below the president’s photo
  • Newspapers across Germany featured the new commander-in-chief 

Newspapers across the globe dedicated their front pages to Donald Trump‘s inauguration on Friday, offering their take on how the 45th president of the United States will impact the world.

France’s Le Figaro featured the mogul on the cover of its magazine edition, writing: ‘What if he did the job?’ The conservative paper chose to outline what it described on its cover as ‘the assets of an unpredictable president’.

In the UK, The Independent took a far less optimistic approach, writing on its front page: ‘So help us God.’

News readers in Japan, Israel, Iceland, the United Arab Emirates and many more countries all caught a glimpse of America’s new commander-in-chief on his inauguration.

French newspaper Le Figaro dedicated its magazine edition to Donald Trump, writing 'What if he did the job?' before outlining the 'assets of an unpredictable president'

French newspaper Le Figaro dedicated its magazine edition to Donald Trump, writing ‘What if he did the job?’ before outlining the ‘assets of an unpredictable president’

In the UK, The Independent took a far less optimistic approach, writing on its front page: 'So help us God' before wondering what Trump's presidency means for the US and the world

In the UK, The Independent took a far less optimistic approach, writing on its front page: ‘So help us God’ before wondering what Trump’s presidency means for the US and the world

Germany's Der Spiegel featured a game of pool made up of several countries' flags as well as Putin's portrait. A pool ball in the colors of the Stars And Stripes can be seen, ready to be launched into the others. The headline reads: 'The new world order - Trump's game'

Germany’s Der Spiegel featured a game of pool made up of several countries’ flags as well as Putin’s portrait. A pool ball in the colors of the Stars And Stripes can be seen, ready to be launched into the others. The headline reads: ‘The new world order – Trump’s game’

Mainichi Shimbun, one of Japan's biggest three dailies, made a similar choice with a photo of Trump taking the oath with Melania, Barron, Ivanka and Tiffany next to him

Frettabladid, Iceland's most circulated newspaper, gave the mogul a small space on its bottom left corner

Mainichi Shimbun (Top), one of Japan’s biggest three dailies, made a similar choice with a photo of Trump taking the oath with Melania, Barron, Ivanka and Tiffany next to him. Frettabladid (bottom), Iceland’s most circulated newspaper, gave the mogul a small space on its bottom left corner

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The New York Times, with which Trump has many times feuded in the past, dedicated its front page to the president, quoting: 'This American carnage stops'

The New York Times, with which Trump has many times feuded in the past, dedicated its front page to the president, quoting: ‘This American carnage stops’

Trump also appeared on the front page of the Washington Post, which also picked up on the 'American carnage' quote like the New York Times did

Trump also appeared on the front page of the Washington Post, which also picked up on the ‘American carnage’ quote like the New York Times did

German weekly magazine Der Spiegel dedicated its cover to Trump but did not show his photo, opting instead for a game of pool made up of several countries’ flags as well as Putin’s portrait.

A pool ball in the colors of the Stars And Stripes can be seen, ready to be launched into the others. The headline reads: ‘The new world order –  Trump’s game.’

Also in Germany, Hamburg’s daily the Hamburger Morgenpost featured the mogul with his raised fist, quoting from his inaugural speech: ‘America first! America first!’

A photo of Trump being sworn in with Melania by his side also circulated on the front page of multiple editions of regional newspaper Hessische/Niedersächsische Allgemeine.

The same image appeared on the front page of the French Figaro, which in addition to its magazine edition also carved out space for the new president on its newspaper version.

Russia's Novaya Gazeta dedicated the homepage of its website to the inauguration on Friday, showing Trump and his family during the oath ceremony

Russia’s Novaya Gazeta dedicated the homepage of its website to the inauguration on Friday, showing Trump and his family during the oath ceremony

Qatar's pro-government daily Al-Sharq ran a picture of the president being sworn in, with his wife Melania, his son Barron, and his daughter Ivanka also featured by his side

Qatar’s pro-government daily Al-Sharq ran a picture of the president being sworn in, with his wife Melania, his son Barron, and his daughter Ivanka also featured by his side

The United Arab Emirates' Gulf News also pictured the billionaire next to his wife, youngest son and eldest daughter, this time with Donald Jr in the fram

The country's Khaleej Times dedicated the top half of its front page to the mogul, writing: 'Its a new world'

The United Arab Emirates’ Gulf News (top) also pictured the billionaire next to his wife, youngest son and eldest daughter, this time with Donald Jr in the frame. The country’s Khaleej Times (bottom) dedicated the top half of its front page to the mogul, writing: ‘It’s a new world’

China Daily gave Trump one column on the right of its front page, writing: 'Early birds gather to see Trump sworn in' above a story on inauguration events

China Daily gave Trump one column on the right of its front page, writing: ‘Early birds gather to see Trump sworn in’ above a story on inauguration events

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In the UK, The Guardian opted for a Trump-centric front page, with a photo of the president with his fist raised and the quote: 'From this moment on it's going to be only America first'

In the UK, The Guardian opted for a Trump-centric front page, with a photo of the president with his fist raised and the quote: ‘From this moment on it’s going to be only America first’

Germany's daily the Hamburger Morgenpost featured the same fist bump photo, quoting from Trumps inaugural speech: 'America first! America first!'

A photo of Trump being sworn in with Melania by his side also circulated on the front page of multiple editions of regional newspaper Hessische/Niedersächsische Allgemeine

Germany’s daily the Hamburger Morgenpost (top) featured the same fist bump photo, quoting from Trumps inaugural speech: ‘America first! America first!’ A photo of Trump being sworn in with Melania by his side also circulated on the front page of multiple editions of regional newspaper Hessische/Niedersächsische Allgemeine (botoom)

Also in France, the Aujourd’hui En France daily featured a portrait of Trump on its Friday edition, calling him: ‘The abnormal president’ – a play on Francois Hollande’s 2012 campaign, during which he said repeatedly he wanted to be a ‘normal’ president.

China Daily gave Trump one column on the right of its front page, writing: ‘Early birds gather to see Trump sworn in’ above a story on inauguration events.

Qatar’s pro-government daily Al-Sharq ran a picture of the president being sworn in, with his wife Melania, his son Barron, and his daughter Ivanka also featured by his side.

Also in France, the Aujourd'hui En France daily featured a portrait of Trump on its Friday edition, calling him: 'The abnormal president' - a play on Francois Hollande's 2012 campaign, during which he said repeatedly he wanted to be a 'normal' president

Also in France, the Aujourd’hui En France daily featured a portrait of Trump on its Friday edition, calling him: ‘The abnormal president’ – a play on Francois Hollande’s 2012 campaign, during which he said repeatedly he wanted to be a ‘normal’ president

In Germany, the Abendzeitung Muenchen ran a picture of Trump with the word 'D-Day' and
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***The Der Tagesspiegel (right) also went for a raised-fist photo

In Germany, the Abendzeitung Muenchen (left) ran a picture of Trump with the word ‘D-Day’ and the Der Tagesspiegel (bottom) also went for a raised-fist photo

'In God we trust': The Times in the UK showed Trump waving to the audience with his family and vice-president Mike Pence by his side, opting to quote the presidential oath

‘In God we trust’: The Times in the UK showed Trump waving to the audience with his family and vice-president Mike Pence by his side, opting to quote the presidential oath

French newspaper Liberation ran a photograph of Trump looking out of a window on their front page 

French newspaper Liberation ran a photograph of Trump looking out of a window on their front page

In Israel, The Jerusalem Post featured Trump on Friday, picturing the president on his way out of plane, right above a story about Jewish groups planning to march on Washington

In Israel, The Jerusalem Post featured Trump on Friday, picturing the president on his way out of plane, right above a story about Jewish groups planning to march on Washington

Mainichi Shimbun, one of Japan’s biggest three dailies, made a similar choice with a photo of Trump taking the oath with Melania, Barron, Ivanka and Tiffany next to him.

The United Arab Emirates’ Gulf News also pictured the billionaire next to his wife, youngest son and eldest daughter, this time with Donald Jr in the frame. The country’s Khaleej Times dedicated the top half of its front page to the mogul, writing: ‘Its a new world.’

Frettabladid, Iceland’s most circulated newspaper, gave the mogul a small space on its bottom left corner.

In Israel, The Jerusalem Post featured Trump on its Friday edition, picturing the president on his way out of plane, right above a story about Jewish groups planning to march on Washington.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4142436/Donald-Trump-s-inauguration-newspapers-world.html#ixzz4WOxJGpco
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