Posts Tagged ‘corruption’

Philippine National Police “Hidden Jail” Adds to List of Gross Human Rights Violations, Disregard for Rule of Law — “PNP exploiting the deadly campaign for their personal gain.” — Expect unlawful police abuses in the name of Duterte’s “war on drugs” to continue

April 28, 2017
Detainees huddle in a makeshift detention cell hidden behind a shelf in the Manila Police District’s Drug Enforcement Unit office on Thursday, April 27, 2017. “The facility housed a dozen men and women in atrocious, grossly overcrowded conditions,” Human Rights Watch said. STAR/Miguel de Guzman

MANILA, Philippines —  Signs of abuses in President Rodrigo Duterte’s brutal war on drugs will continue to surface after an allegedly hidden jail was discovered in Tondo, an international human rights organization said on Friday.

Phelim Kine, deputy director for Asia at New York-based Human Rights Watch, warned that elements of the Philippine National Police are exploiting the deadly campaign for their personal gain.

Representatives from the Philippines’ Commission on Human Rights trooped to Manila Police District Station 1 yesterday after receiving a tip that several personalities are held up and being extorted of P40,000 to P200,000 in exchange of their freedom.

The surprise visit of CHR led them to an airless cell concealed by a bookshelf at a police station in Tondo, an urban poor district in Manila.

“The facility housed a dozen men and women in atrocious, grossly overcrowded conditions,” Kine said in a statement.

Gilbert Boisner, a lawyer who serves as CHR’s head in Metro Manila, said that the detainees suffer from inhumane conditions inside the cell.

He earlier told the STAR that the detainees were hidden from the public and did not undergo inquest proceedings. At least four individuals also said they were being asked to produce money in exchange for freedom.

“Detainees said that inadequate lighting, ventilation, and toilet facilities forced them ‘to urinate and [do] bowel movements in plastic bags,” Kine said, citing Boisner.

In a television interview, Tondo station 1 commander Superintendent Roberto Domingo claimed that it was his initiative to use the vacant space in their office to accommodate other detainees since their cell is congested.

Domingo also denied the allegations they are extorting money.

“Hindi po tagong kulungan ‘yun, ‘yun po ay holding area kasi doon ang investigation room ng drug enforcement unit… wala na po kami mapaglagyan ng preso dahil sa dami,” Domingo told “State of the Nation” of GMA News TV.

The HRW, meanwhile, noted a similar case of alleged police abuse in the killing of Korean businessman Jee Ick Joo. The victim was abducted and killed by cops inside the PNP national headquarters in Quezon City.

“The officers—members of the Anti-Illegal Drugs Group – used a fake arrest warrant that falsely accused him of illegal drug activities. They reportedly strangled Jee to death that same day, but two weeks later demanded—and received—a $100,000 ransom from his family,” Kine said.

Earlier, HRW research also exposed the death squad-style extrajudicial executions by police and police agents.

Kine believes that the key to stop the abuse of human rights in the Philippines is an investigation by United Nations.

“Expect unlawful police abuses in the name of Duterte’s “war on drugs” to continue until the United Nations establishes an urgently needed independent, international investigation into the killings—and the secret jails that are part of it,” Kine said.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/04/28/1694768/hidden-jail-seen-sign-pnps-abuse-drug-war

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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

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Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

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High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Xi Jinping summons China’s financial watchdogs in rare move, warning them to watch out for risks — Safeguarding financial security is a strategic need

April 27, 2017

President’s move reflects concern about shocks that could lead to crisis or even social disorder ahead of key party conference this autumn

By Frank Tang

South China Morning Post
Thursday, April 27, 2017, 3:01pm

South China Sea: Vietnam Shows How To Work With Superpowers — China has indeed invaded the Philippines….

April 24, 2017

Commentary
The Philippine Inquirer

In addressing the conflict between the Philippines and China, let us remember two things:

1) China has legitimate, historical reasons for feeling vulnerable on its seaboard, 2) small Vietnam has successfully fought against China and other mighty powers in safeguarding its sovereignty.

In the past 2,000 years, China has been invaded repeatedly from the sea: by the Japanese in 1592, 1894, 1898 and 1937; by the British in 1839, 1856 and 1898.

After effectively taking control of the Philippines, Spanish hawks urged the conquest of China. Fortunately that plan fell through. However, in the early 20th century, European powers took advantage of China’s weakness to carve out “concessions” in Chinese cities that were de facto colonies.

Though the communists expelled the imperialists in 1949, they were soon confronted by the United States with a chain of military bases, with two big ones in the Philippines. China has become America’s major creditor, yet some American hawks aim to encircle and ultimately destroy China’s military might. Unfortunately, many Filipinos trust the United States and its policy of encirclement. Small wonder, China looks at us as a naive American pawn.

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Let us heed nationalists like Claro M. Recto who pointed out that we cannot be truly independent unless we distance ourselves from the United States and craft our own foreign policy. From the 1950s till the 1960s, Recto warned us about getting dragged into another war with no assurance of immediate American help.

On the other hand, China has indeed invaded territory that is ours. We must resist, lest the Chinese be tempted to grab more. But can we do so? Are we not too small to resist?

The Vietnamese have shown that it is possible. Relying on their own efforts, they drove out the Chinese in 938 and again in 1427; they also defeated the terrifying Mongols in 1288. They defeated the French in 1954, the United States in 1975, and once again the Chinese in 1979.

How did they succeed? Through astuteness on both the battlefield and the halls of diplomacy. We should learn from the brave Vietnamese. While forcefully resisting Chinese incursions, they still manage to attract Chinese investments.

Hopefully, President Duterte can channel his energy into building a strong Philippine military and crafting a nationalistic diplomacy. That will be his legacy. Our nation is divided today. We need a cause that can heal our wounds and bring us together.

FERNANDO ZIALCITA, fzialcita@ateneo.edu

Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/103416/dealing-superpowers-learn-vietnam#ixzz4fB3Wjd7z
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

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‘Apartheid Without the Racism’: How China Keeps Rural Folks Down

April 24, 2017

By Mark Magnier
The Wall Street Journal
April 24, 2017

YANJIAO, China–An epic property boom restricted to city dwellers has opened a wealth gap that continues to widen in China, setting back a state campaign to ease poverty and shunting rural dwellers from the middle-class dream.

China’s system of hukou, or household registration, a decades-old legacy of the planned economy, binds most Chinese to their place of birth, and denies those outside China’s booming megacities the right to buy property inside them.

That has largely shut them out of one of history’s biggest wealth transfers; 98% of Chinese housing is now in private hands from virtually none a generation ago. Over the past decade, housing prices have increased up to 700% in cities like Beijing and Shanghai. Property now accounts for 70% of personal wealth in the country.

“Housing is everything in China,” said Southwestern University of Finance and Economics professor Li Gan. Unless the Communist Party privatizes land, which is unlikely, farmers will continue to lose ground, he said.

Meanwhile the pace of home prices keeps rising; March was the fastest gain in the last five months. China has recently stepped up efforts to fight poverty, including extending medical insurance to the poor and resettling them from areas prone to landslides and other geological threats. It also said it is building a new megacity two hours from Beijing, bringing whirlwind growth to a dusty backwater. Both initiatives suggest leaders’ awareness of the deep inequities along rural-urban lines.

In 1978, when China embarked on economic reforms, city dwellers earned about twice as much as rural residents; they now earn about 3.5 times as much, according to a study released in April by Paris School of Economics professor Thomas Piketty and World Bank consultant Li Yang.

Studies by the Asian Development Bank and the University of Michigan suggest China’s rich-poor gap is even higher once property and hukou status are taken into account. “The urban-rural wealth divide is much greater than the income divide,” said Southwestern University’s Mr. Gan.

Often the difference comes down to a line on a map.

Wang Qiang, a 30-year old construction engineer from a village in northern China, bought an apartment in 2014 in the “Banyan Tree Harbor” residential complex astride a garbage dump in Yanjiao, just outside Beijing, across a dying river in Hebei province.

Looking across the dry riverbed separating Yanjiao from the capital, Mr. Wang says he hopes Beijing will someday absorb his community.

Giving him hope, some cities across China have extended property-buying rights to rural hukou holders around them. With a Beijing hukou, Mr. Wang’s family would have access to better schools and hospitals and his two-bedroom apartment would be twice as valuable.

But for now, “I feel stuck,” he said. “Yanjiao schools have up to 80 children in a classroom. It’s two different worlds.”

On the other side, 38-year-old app developer Liu Wei emerges from his apartment in upscale “Jingmao International City,” a gated community with bamboo groves and Maserati cars. Over the past decade, his Beijing residency status has helped him to purchase several apartments and a villa that he said are now worth up to ten times what he paid for them.

“I’m absolutely delighted with the price appreciation,” he said. Does he feel lucky? Not particularly. “I’m no different from my friends.”

Speculation that Yanjiao may be absorbed into Beijing has driven up property prices there at a rate matching that of Beijing in the past couple of years. But Yanjiao property values are still one fourth of those across the river.

And across China, urban residents accumulated wealth at twice the rate of rural dwellers between 2002 and 2010, leaving citydwellers with a nest egg six times larger, mostly due to housing, according to a 2015 study by Shi Li & Haiyuan Wan in China Economic Journal.

The opportunity cost of a rural background becomes even starker when considering the insider deals handed to urbanites who lived in apartments associated with their government jobs when China started to privatize housing.

Fang Liping, a 55-year-old retired math teacher, and her husband got their big break in the late 1990s when her school let her buy their three-bedroom government-owned apartment in central Shanghai for 500,000 yuan [around $72,000]. The five-story walkup is now worth around $1 million and the family has since purchased two more apartments.

“We didn’t consider it an investment,” she said of her original apartment. “It’s what everyone was doing.”

China has for decades talked about overhauling the hukou system, which economists say undercuts economic growth. Political resistance is strong as city officials balk at providing services to more people.

“The hukou system is kind of like apartheid without the racism,” said Scott Kennedy, a China expert with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “The life chances or rural and urban Chinese are vastly different.”

While Beijing and Shanghai have plans to cap their populations, small cities ringed by unsold apartment blocks have welcomed rural hukou holders. However, they have little to offer in terms of jobs.

Beyond access to appreciating property markets, rural residents are also boxed out of good schooling and a range of other services in major cities.

“I’ve always thought about getting a home in the city and a city hukou, but it never came true, ” said Yang Shuanghu, 35, a driver from a village in poor Gansu province who can’t work due to a back injury. Mr. Yang, who never finished middle school, gets a rural income allowance of about $15 a quarter.

“To get by, sometimes I have to go to my sister’s house to get food,” he said. “Perhaps my daughter can grow up, get some education, and leave this place.”

Liyan Qi and Fanfan Wang and Pei Li contributed to this article.

Write to Mark Magnier at mark.magnier@wsj.com

Amid South China Sea dispute, Chinese President Xi says be combat-ready

April 24, 2017

By: PTI | Beijing | Updated: April 23, 2017 3:25 pm

China News, PLA, President xi jinping, Indian express, India News, World News, Southern Theater, Military China, Chinese President Xi Jinping meets with military officers during an inspection of the Southern Theater Command of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) (Li Gang/Xinhua via AP)Chinese President Xi Jinping has underlined the need for building a combat-ready army and accelerate the building of the theatre joint combat command system, amidst the PLA flexing its muscles in the disputed South China Sea. Xi, the ruling Communist party’s General Secretary and the Central Military Commission’s Chairman, made the comments while inspecting the Southern Theatre Command of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) on Friday and stressed building a strong army which should also avoid being corrupt. Xi, 63, viewed as the most powerful leader heading the party, military and the government will complete his first five year term this year and expected to be re-elected for another five-year term during the 19th Party Congress to be held later this year.

He vowed to fight corruption and enhance the “sense of gain” among officers and soldiers of the 2.3 million-strong People’s Liberation Army, the world’s largest. Xi asked military personnel to strengthen their awareness in preparing for war, closely follow changes of situations and make unremitting efforts to enhance combat capabilities.

Xi required an accelerated building of the theatre joint combat command system, vigorous development of a new-type fighting force and simultaneous improvement of national defence strength and economic development, the official Xinhua news agency quoted him as saying. His comments came amid China’s maritime disputes with its South China Sea neighbours. China claims almost all of the South China Sea, including islands more than 800 miles from the Chinese mainland, despite objections from neighbours such as the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei and Vietnam.

Beijing has also created artificial islands in the area, outfitting some of them with military features. The issue is a source of ongoing tension and anger in the region. In his speech, Xi urged all military personnel to resolutely safeguard the authority of CPC Central Committee, unswervingly follow the Party’s leadership and combat corruption. He asked all military personnel to greet the 19th CPC National Congress scheduled for later this year with “outstanding achievements,” Xinhua quoted him as saying.

Noting that 2017 is of great significance for the Party and the country, Xi urged the PLA to strengthen ideological building, combat preparation and reform implementation. Xi urged PLA officers to eliminate the impact of Gen Guo Boxiong and Gen Xu Caihou, two corrupt former CMC vice chairmen, and strictly observe political discipline and rules.

“It must be ensured that the PLA resolutely follows the command of the CPC Central Committee and the CMC at any time, in any circumstances,” Xi said. A campaign, which focuses on the study of the Party Constitution and rules, as well as the speeches by Xi, and calls for being qualified Party members, is required to be further launched in the army.

For all the latest World News, download Indian Express App now

First Published on: April 23, 2017 3:16 pm

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Vietnamese Villagers “Win” Land Dispute After Capturing, Detaining More Than 20 Communist Government Officials

April 22, 2017

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A police officer thanks villagers after the hostages, who were originally held by the villagers in a land dispute, were released in Dong Tam, outside Hanoi, Vietnam April 22, 2017. REUTERS/Kham

AFP

HANOI, April 22 — More than a dozen police and officials held hostage by Vietnamese villagers over a land dispute were released today, state media reported, ending a week-long standoff that had gripped the country.

The rare act of defiance in My Duc, a suburban district of capital Hanoi, was sparked last week by clashes between authorities and villagers who said their farmland was being illegally seized for a military-owned telecoms firm.

After authorities detained a number of local residents protesting the seizure, including an 82-year-old man, villagers retaliated by taking 38 police officers and officials hostage.

Following a week of tension, Hanoi’s mayor Nguyen Duc Chung was welcomed into the community today. It had been sealed off by barricades made from logs, sandbags and bricks.

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Hanoi’s Mayor Nguyen Duc Chung (3rd R) is greeted by villagers at Dong Tam commune, My Duc district in Hanoi on April 22, 2017.
(AFP PHOTO / STR / MANILA BULLETIN)

After the negotiations “villagers led a working team to the community house to release the 19” remaining hostages, state-run Tuoi Tre newspaper reported.

Sixteen other hostages had been released earlier in the week, while three others had escaped. The detained villagers were also freed.

“We admit it was wrong to hold these people,” Tuoi Tre quoted villager Bui Van Ky as saying during the meeting with the mayor.

“But this came from (the authorities’) prolonged announcement, saying that 59 hectares of our cultivated land belongs to the military…We have been very angry,” he added.

Vietnam’s communist government strictly curbs freedom of expression, bars an independent media and jails dissidents.

But flash points do occur, with property disputes a key source of tension in a country where all land is technically owned by the state.

The government allocates land-use rights certificates to citizens but the laws are opaque, leaving poor farmers vulnerable.

According to state media, mayor Chung vowed to investigate the land dispute, which the community said had been ignored for years.

He also reportedly promised villagers they would not face criminal charges for the hostage crisis.

Armed police blocked AFP reporters from entering the community while the negotiations were under way today. — AFP

– See more at: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/world/article/vietnam-village-frees-hostages-held-over-land-dispute#sthash.5IynmP9S.dpuf

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Village In Vietnam Is Holding A Dozen Police Officers Hostage

By Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian
APRIL 17, 2017 – 3:19 PM

This Village In Vietnam Is Holding A Dozen Police Officers Hostage

Villagers in a Hanoi suburb are holding twelve police officers and more than a dozen others hostage amid a land dispute. The standoff is rare in Communist Vietnam, where land seizures are common but protesters have few rights.

More than 30 people are being held in My Duc, a village outside of the capital. The clash began on Saturday, when local officials detained four villagers after authorities made plans to seize 116 acres of land, allegedly without fair compensation. Local government officials aimed to give the land to Viettel, Vietnam’s largest telecom firm, which is run by the military, according to the activist-run website Vietnam Human Rights Defenders.

“Local residents said they have no intention of releasing the hostages unless the central government intervenes,” an activist named La Viet Dung told Agence France-Press after a trip to My Duc on April 16. “People have closed off their villages. No one can come in or out. The police are surrounding the area also, preventing media access. The situation is tense.”

Land disputes are a major source of conflict between residents and government authorities

Land disputes are a major source of conflict between residents and government authorities in the southeast Asian nation. In 2012, land-related grievances comprised 70 percent of all complaints lodged against the government. Local authorities may make deals with developers or state-run firms, evicting small farmers from their land without compensation.The Communist Party has ruled over a unified Vietnam since 1975, when it implemented Beijing-style farm collectivization and a command-style economy. Beginning in the 1980s, after such policies had mired the country in poverty, the party pursued doi moi, or economic reforms, aimed at creating a socialist-oriented market economy. The subsequent rise of private enterprise and a mixed market economy has sparked rapid economic expansion. In 2016, the country’s GDP growth rate was about 6.7 percent, making it one of the fastest-growing economies in the world.

But reform remains incomplete. A 1993 land reform law granted land-use rights to private individuals, but no legal framework for true private ownership of land exists. That makes farmers vulnerable to land grabs by state-run corporations as land prices have skyrocketed amid high growth, particularly around urban centers.

Dissent is dangerous in Vietnam, where there are few human rights protections and little freedom of speech. But land seizures and forced evictions touch a national nerve. In some cases, state-run media have backed landholders against authorities. In 2012, local officials evicted a fish farmer named Doan Van Vuon from his land and tore down his home, then detained him after he attempted to defend his land using guns and land mines. Government-backed media outlets ran a series of articles sympathetic to Vuon, arousing public indignation around the country, and Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung intervened, punishing local officials and forcing them to return the seized land.

HOANG DINH NAM/AFP/Getty Images

Source: http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/04/17/this-village-in-vietnam-is-holding-a-dozen-police-officers-hostage/

Taliban attack underlines shortcomings in Afghan security

April 22, 2017

Taliban militants have attacked an army compound in northern Afghanistan, killing more than 140 army personnel. Some say intelligence failures and other mistakes by Kabul and its foreign allies led to the incident.

Afghanistan Angriff der Taliban auf eine Militärbasis in Masar-i-Scharif (Reuters/A. Usyan)

Thirteen Taliban militants disguised in military uniforms launched an attack on the Afghan army base in northern Balkh province on Friday, storming it in three military vehicles. They killed most of their victims in a mosque inside the compound where army personnel were at Friday prayers.

“They are getting closer to our building and shooting anyone they see,” a medical staffer of the 209th Shaheen Military Corps told DW only minutes after the attack on the army base had started.

“Pray for me,” the medical staffer begged in his telephone conversation with DW, as if those were his last words.

DW was able to establish contact with the corps medical staffer only one hour after the first call. Fortunately, he was alive and in a secure location, but had very sad news.

“More then 135 are killed and many more wounded,” he said.

Karte Afghanistan Mazar-i-Sharif Englisch (DW)

Three-hour rampage

The number of those killed in the attack rose to 143 later, with more than 160 others wounded. All the assailants were also killed after going on a rampage for more than three hours at the base.

The base in Mazar-i-Sharif is the command center for northern Afghanistan. A contingent from the German army is based there as well, but no German soldiers were reported injured in the attack.

“Many of my friends, people who worked with me, are among the casualties,” said the medical staffer, who did not want to be named as he was not authorized to talk to media.

This is the second such attack on a secure facility in recent months. In early March, “Islamic State” (IS) militants attacked a military hospital in Kabul and killed 49 people, leaving 76 wounded. The actual number of those killed in the Kabul attack is also said to be much higher than the numbers given by the Afghan government.

Afghanistan Taliban-Angriff auf Militärlager in Mazar-i-Sharif (Getty Images/AFP/F. Usyan)Fighting went on for some three hours before the attackers were killed

Taliban boosts attacks in northern Afghan provinces

Such a large-scale attack in Balkh province would have been considered very unlikely only a few years back. Northern provinces – Balkh in particular – were considered the safest in Afghanistan until 2010. But now Kunduz, Balkh, Faryab, Sari Pul and Baghlan – all in the north – have become a new battlefield between Afghan security forces and its armed opponents.

Read more on the situation in northern Afghanistan here.

The Taliban, which claimed responsibility for Friday’s attack, has boosted its presence in several districts and is threatening to launch attacks on provincial capitals. The group was even able to briefly take control of northern Kunduz city in 2015 and for a second time a year later.

“The government controls Kunduz city and district centers but the Taliban are in charge of the rest of the province,” Abdul Ahad Turyal Kakar, a member of the provincial council in Kunduz, told DW.

The situation in Balkh is not as dire as in Kunduz, but Friday’s attack highlights the Taliban’s ability to launch a heavy attack on one of the most heavily guarded compounds in the safest northern Afghan province.

Afghanistan Taliban Kämpfer in der Ghazni Provinz (Reuters)Taliban militants are stepping up attacks in Afghanistan’s north

Foreign terrorists on the move

The Taliban is not the only worry for locals in Afghanistan’s north: Locals and officials claim that fighters from IS and other foreign terrorist groups are becoming more active.

Yunus Fakur, a Kabul-based analyst, believes the situation in the north is also a result of the mistakes Kabul and its international allies have made in the past decade. He said that besides the Taliban and foreign insurgent groups, local commanders that are heavily armed and who fear irrelevance also pose a threat to the region.

“Post 2001, many local commanders in (the) Afghan north remained heavily armed, and whenever they feel that they don’t get the support they need from Kabul, they join hands with the Taliban and other groups to ensure their relevance,” Fakur told DW.

Some military experts, on the other hand, stressed that Friday’s attack happened only because of intelligence failures.

“If the intelligence community fails, there is not much soldiers on the ground can do,” retired Afghan general Atiqullah Amarkhail told DW.

Amarkhail stressed the government should curb corruption, improve intelligence organizations and hold local officials accountable to prevent such incidents in the future.

http://www.dw.com/en/taliban-attack-underlines-shortcomings-in-afghan-security/a-38543263

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Philippines: Presidential Spokesman Calls 7,000 Extrajudicial Killings “Fake News” (It’s actually more like 9,000) — Further Erodes Credibility of Philippine Government, Philippine National Police (PNP)

April 21, 2017
Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella called reports on more than 7,000 extralegal killings “false news.” PCOO/King Rodriguez

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte’s spokesperson on Friday called reports of nearly 9,000 drug-related deaths “false news,” months after media organizations and international groups used the figure in their reports.

Ernesto Abella, the presidential spokesperson, said that the persistent reports of more 7,000 killed, which is now said to be nearly 9,000, was “false news” as the Philippine National Police (PNP) said that the figure was much lower.

“On the number of extrajudicial deaths, the persistent news reports of 7,000 killed, which is now being said to be close to 9,000, is false,” Abella said.

The president’s spokesperson said that based on official police data there were only 6,011 homicide cases being investigated. Of the figure, only 1,398 cases were found to be drug related, contrary to reports that 9,000 have already been killed in anti-illegal drugs operations, Abella said.

Abella, meanwhile, called on organizations which report on drug incidents to be fair and not to rush to judgment as he emphasized that people appreciated the changes being implemented by the administration and the way these were carried out.

“We ask to be understood not just from a single perspective, but from the point of view of Filipinos who desire change, stability and fairness,” Abella said.

The number of murders and homicide cases, however, have risen dramatically at the start of the Duterte administration last year despite government’s denial that they are related to the brutal war on drugs. Drug experts also acknowledge that stringent law enforcement policy against narcotics have historically resulted in unnecessary violence and deaths.

Abella’s comments came days after a Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed that public satisfaction with the government’s conduct of the war on drugs plunging by 11 points, from +77 in December 2016 to +66 in March 2017.

He also assuaged American concern on the increasing extrajudicial killings in the Philippines, saying that those who breached protocol would be made to account.

“We share the concern of US Assistant Secretary of State for Southeast Asia Patrick Murphy, who has been quoted in the media saying ‘there are elements of the drug war that are operating outside the rule of law,’” the spokesperson said.

Abella said that the PNP has an Internal Affairs Service which would probe into cases of police violations.

“This body can suspend or dismiss PNP personnel based on violations incurred and can recommend the filing of criminal charges,” he said.

He said that security forces followed procedures in conducting their operations although force may be used to protect the safety of the police.

“Local authorities follow operation protocols and the proper enforcement of our laws requires the use of reasonable force merited by the attendant circumstances,” he said.

Not a single cop, however, has been accused by police investigators before a court of unjustifiably killing drug suspects in police operations. President Rodrigo Duterte himself said he will defend and pardon cops accused of wrongdoing in the field.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/04/21/1692511/abella-calls-7000-extrajudicial-killings-fake-news

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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

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Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

 

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High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

 

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP