Posts Tagged ‘cross-border attacks’

Pakistani army: Militants attack patrol, killing 2 soldiers

December 12, 2017

Pakistan troops on patrol in Waziristan. (AFP)

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s army says militants opened fire on an army vehicle on patrol in the country’s mountainous northwestern region near the Afghan border, killing two soldiers.

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Tuesday’s statement says the military vehicle came under attack in the North Waziristan tribal region. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack, but Islamic militants have long been operating in the area.
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The military has carried out massive operation against them but militants are able to cross the porous Afghan-Pakistan border and shelter on the other side. They have also been able to carry out cross-border attacks.
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The Pakistani army has been constructing a series of fences along the border, which zigzags across a remote and difficult mountain terrain, to check the movement of militants.
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Afghanistan objects to the construction of the fences.
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India, Pakistan Exchange Gunfire on Kashmir Border

October 1, 2016

AFP

Indian Border Security Force (BSF) personnel patrol at the India-Pakistan border village Daoke. AFP photo

ISLAMABAD (AFP) – Pakistan and India exchanged fresh fire across the de-facto Kashmir border Saturday, the Pakistani military said, with Indian officials stating there was no damage as tensions rise between the nuclear-armed rivals.

“Pakistani troops befittingly responded to Indian unprovoked firing” which started at 4:00 am (2300 GMT) and continued for four hours in Bhimber sector on the Pakistani side of the border, a military statement said.

It did not mention casualties.

“There was small arms fire and mortar shells fire from across the border in Akhnoor sector which lasted for around two hours (4:00 am to 6:00 am),” Pawan Kotwal, a top civilian official in Jammu and Kashmir state on the Indian side, told AFP.

“No damage was caused. We are ready for any eventuality but it is peaceful in Jammu region.”

The skirmish came two days after India claimed it had carried out “surgical strikes” across the heavily militarised Line of Control (LoC), the de facto border in the disputed territory, on what it called “terrorist” targets several kilometres (miles) inside Pakistan-controlled Kashmir.

The rare public admission of such action sparked furious rhetoric from Pakistan and calls for restraint from the US and the UN.

Tensions between the two arch rivals have been boiling since the Indian government accused Pakistan-based militants of launching an assault on an army base in Kashmir earlier this month that killed 18 soldiers.

“This is a dangerous moment for the region,” Pakistan’s Ambassador Maleeha Lodhi told AFP after meeting with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at UN headquarters in New York.

Ban Friday offered to act as a mediator between New Delhi and Islamabad to defuse the tensions.

In a statement to AFP, India’s mission to the United Nations said “India has no desire to aggravate the situation,” and that “our response was a measured counter-terrorist strike”.

India and Pakistan have fought three wars since they gained independence from Britain seven decades ago, two of them over the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir.

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Pakistan accuses India of “unprovoked and naked aggression”after attack — India accuses Pakistan of supporting Islamist militants who target India

September 29, 2016

India’s army says it has carried out strikes on terrorist bases across the country’s de facto border with Pakistan.

An Indian army soldier stands guard near the site of a gun battle between Indian army soldiers and rebels inside an army brigade headquarters near the border with Pakistan, known as the Line of Control (LoC), in Uri on September 18, 2016.

Relations between India and Pakistan have deteriorated in recent months. AFP photo

By NIHARIKA MANDHANA
The Wall Street Journal
Updated Sept. 29, 2016 11:53 a.m. ET

NEW DELHI—India’s army said Thursday it had carried out overnight “surgical strikes” on what it described as terrorist bases across the country’s de facto border with Pakistan, a move likely to heighten already soaring tensions between the nuclear-armed neighbors.

In a news conference, Lt. Gen. Ranbir Singh, India’s director general of military operations, said “significant casualties have been caused to the terrorists and those who are trying to support them.”

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif issued a statement condemning what he called “unprovoked and naked aggression” by India, whose actions he said resulted in the deaths of two Pakistani soldiers.

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Indian military and government officials said Indian forces had crossed the line of control that separates the Indian- and Pakistani-governed parts of Kashmir to hit militant camps. Both countries claim the disputed region in full.

Pakistan’s military denied there had been any intrusion from India, saying Indian troops had fired from their side of the frontier. Pakistan’s army said it responded “strongly and befittingly.”

The strikes followed a militant assault on an Indian army installation earlier in September that killed 18 soldiers. India blamed Pakistan for that attack, which Prime Minister Narendra Modi said wouldn’t go “unpunished.”

This file photograph taken on December 4, 2003, shows Indian soldiers as they patrol along a barbed-wire fence near Baras Post on the Line of Control (LoC) between Pakistan and India some 174 kms north west of Srinagar.

Image copyright AFP

“Based on receiving specific and credible inputs that so

Sporadic cross-border firing isn’t unusual between the estranged neighbors, but raids by the countries’ armed forces are rare. A senior Indian official said this was the first time India had publicly acknowledged carrying out such a strike. Both India and Pakistan are believed to have covertly undertaken similar operations in the past.

Girding for possible retaliation, Indian authorities ordered the evacuation of villages along the frontier with Pakistan. Gen. Singh said the military was “prepared for any contingency that may arise.”

India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars since independence from Britain in 1947, three of them over Kashmir. India accuses Pakistan of supporting Islamist militants who target India, something Islamabad denies. Pakistani terrorists killed 166 people in Mumbai in 2008.
The most recent conflict involving security forces of the two sides was in 1999, when troops clashed in the mountains of Kashmir.

Mr. Modi has pledged a more muscular approach to dealing with terror and other security threats. Last year, Indian special forces carried out strikes in neighboring Myanmar against militants it blamed for attacks on Indian security personnel in the country’s northeast.
“This is unprecedented. It is a message to Pakistan that the paradigms of the past are no longer valid,” said Ajai Sahni, executive director of the New Delhi-based South Asia Terrorism Portal. Still, he said, he thought New Delhi had stopped short of actions that would provoke escalation from Pakistan.

Relations between the two have been strained for months as unrest has gripped the Indian-governed part of Kashmir. Islamabad has criticized India’s use of force against antigovernment demonstrators. India accuses Pakistan of stoking the protests and the violence.

The senior Indian official accused Pakistan of trying to increase militant forays into India to capitalize on the turmoil in Kashmir and further destabilize the region. Islamabad denies it has any connection to militancy in Kashmir.

Since the militant attack on the Indian army base on Sept. 18, India has stepped up diplomatic pressure to isolate Pakistan. New Delhi and three other South Asian countries said this week that they would boycott a regional summit set to be held in Islamabad in November.

Smoke rose from an Indian Army base which was attacked in Uri, west of Srinagar in Indian Kashmir, on Sept. 18. Tensions between Pakistan and India have been high since the terror attack that killed 18 soldiers.

Smoke rose from an Indian Army base which was attacked in Uri, west of Srinagar in Indian Kashmir, on Sept. 18. Tensions between Pakistan and India have been high since the terror attack that killed 18 soldiers.
Smoke rose from an Indian Army base which was attacked in Uri, west of Srinagar in Indian Kashmir, on Sept. 18. Tensions between Pakistan and India have been high since the terror attack that killed 18 soldiers. PHOTO:EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

On Wednesday, the White House said the U.S. national-security adviser, Susan Rice, “strongly condemned” the militant attack, which it said highlighted “the danger that cross-border terrorism poses to the region.”

According to senior Indian officials, Indian forces crossed the line of control and hit temporary terrorist camps about a mile inside Pakistani-held territory. A military officer familiar with the operations said the forces pushed as far as 3 miles before withdrawing back across the line of control. Similar operations were conducted in 2013 after an Indian soldier was beheaded and another mutilated in border clashes, the officer said. Those raids weren’t disclosed to the public.

Pakistan’s military spokesman, Lt. Gen. Asim Bajwa, said India’s assertions of a “surgical strike” were a “fabrication.” He said, “Nothing like that happened on the ground.”

Pakistan’s defense minister, Khawaja Muhammad Asif, also played down the event, which he described as “small weapons fire” across the line of control.

Another Pakistani security official said the confrontation involved “post-to-post fire exchange” along the line of control with some small-scale movement of Indian troops toward Pakistani posts.

India’s Gen. Singh said the military action followed “specific and credible information” that terrorists were waiting to infiltrate into India and carry out attacks in Kashmir and Indian cities. Gen. Singh said the Indian army had foiled 20 infiltration attempts by terrorists this year.

Attacks in India by Pakistani militants have brought India and Pakistan close to war before, including the 2001 attack on the Indian parliament, blamed by Delhi on the Pakistani jihadist group Jaish-e-Mohammad, and the 2008 multiday assault on Mumbai, which India says was carried out by Lashkar-e-Taiba.

India has blamed Jaish-e-Mohammad for the attack on the military base earlier in September, as well as an assault on an air base close to the Pakistani border at the start of the year. Despite assurances from Islamabad that it would act against terrorists, Jaish-e-Mohammad, which has denied involvement, has continued to operate openly from its base in central Pakistan.

Hafiz Saeed, the head of Jamaat-ud-Dawa, which the United Nations considers a front for Lashkar-e-Taiba, continues to give lectures and sermons—for instance, addressing followers at the festival of Eid earlier in September.

On Thursday, in the Indian state of Punjab, officials urged villagers to move away from border areas, making announcements over loudspeakers, said Mohan Singh, a police constable in the Punjabi city of Amritsar. Schools and shops were ordered closed on Thursday afternoon.

“We are telling people that the place might not be safe for them soon,” he said.

—Qasim Nauman and Saeed Shah in Islamabad, Pakistan, and Rajesh Roy and Vibhuti Agarwal in New Delhi contributed to this article.

Write to Niharika Mandhana at niharika.mandhana@wsj.com

http://www.wsj.com/articles/india-says-it-hit-terrorist-bases-in-pakistan-controlled-kashmir-with-strikes-1475135558

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Kashmir dispute: Two Pakistani soldiers killed after clashes with India

India Strikes Out At Pakistan — Two Pakistani Soldiers Killed

September 29, 2016
  •  India and Pakistan have gone to war FOUR times – 1947, 1965, 1971, 1999
  •  Tensions are rising again over control of Kashmir, which is mainly Muslim
  •  Eighteen Indian soldiers were killed by ‘terrorists’ earlier this month
  •  Now two Pakistani soldiers have died after ‘cross-border fire’ from India 

Pakistan today blamed ‘cross-border fire’ from India for the death of two of its soldiers in the disputed region of Kashmir as fears grow that the two old enemies may go to war again.

India and Pakistan have gone to war four times since they gained independence from Britain in 1947 and diplomats are concerned the situation in Kashmir may be the trigger for another conflict.

India said it had conducted ‘surgical strikes’ along the disputed border with Pakistan – known as the Line Of Control – in a bid to thwart attacks by those it claims are ‘terrorists’.

The Indian army's director general of military operations, Lieutenant General Ranbir Singh (pictured) told the media today it had targeted 'terrorist launchpads' in Kashmir

Pakistan and India often trade fire in Kashmir, which is split between the two countries and claimed by both in its entirety.

Both countries have troops stationed on the strategic Siachen Glacier, which is so cold that soldiers are regularly warned not to fall asleep while on duty for fear of freezing to death.

Earlier this month 18 Indian soldiers were killed in an attack by Kashmiri rebels, who New Delhi suggests are supported by Pakistan.

Earlier this month Kashmiri 'terrorists' attacked this Indian Army base at Uri, killing 18 soldiers

Earlier this month Kashmiri ‘terrorists’ attacked this Indian Army base at Uri, killing 18 soldiers

India said the attack on the Uri army base was carried out by a Pakistan-based group called Jaish-e-Mohammed.

More than 80 people have been killed in the Indian-controlled part of Kashmir since July, many of them civilians shot by the army.

India and Pakistan are both now believed to possess nuclear weapons, which makes the current tensions even more alarming.

Indian soldiers on the Siachen Glacier in Kashmir

Pakistan soldiers, tied to each other for safety in hostile weather conditions, carry their weapons as they cross the Siachen Glacier

Indian soldiers (left) and Pakistani troops (right) are both stationed on the Siachen Glacier, at the eastern end of the disputed border in Kashmir

Lieutenant General Ranbir Singh, India’s director-general of military operations, said today it had carried out ‘surgical strikes’ on Wednesday night.

Pakistan’s military said two of its soldiers had been killed by ‘cross-border fire’ and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif condemned India’s ‘naked aggression’.

Lt Gen Singh said: ‘Some terrorist teams had positioned themselves at launchpads along the Line of Control.’

He said they had ‘very specific and credible’ intelligence about ‘terrorist launchpads’ near the villages of Bhimber, Kel and Lipa.

India has a large military presence in Kashmir, which has a Muslim majority. Many Kashmiris want to be independent or part of Pakistan 

India has a large military presence in Kashmir, which has a Muslim majority. Many Kashmiris want to be independent or part of Pakistan

Lt Gen Singh said: ‘Significant casualties have been caused to these terrorists and those who are trying to support them.

‘The operations aimed at neutralising the terrorists have since ceased.’

He said the operation was designed to stop those who planned ‘to carry out infiltration and terrorist strikes in Jammu and Kashmir and various other metros in our country’.

Lt Gen Singh said: ‘The operations were basically focused to ensure that these terrorists do not succeed in their design of infiltration and carrying out destruction and endangering the lives of citizens of our country.’

India's Prime Minister Narenda Modi (left) and Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif (right) are seen meeting in 2014 but since then tensions have grown markedly

India’s Prime Minister Narenda Modi (left) and Pakistan’s Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif (right) are seen meeting in 2014 but since then tensions have grown markedly

But Pakistan reacted angrily. A statement by the military read: ‘There has been no surgical strike by India, instead there had been cross-border fire initiated and conducted by India.

‘As per rules of engagement same was strongly and befittingly responded by Pakistani troops.

‘The notion of surgical strike linked to alleged terrorists’ bases is an illusion being deliberately generated by Indian to create false effects.

‘This quest by Indian establishment to create media hype by rebranding cross-border fire as surgical strike is fabrication of truth.’

Kashmiri demonstrators hurl stones at an Indian police vehicle during a protest in Srinagar last month

Kashmiri demonstrators hurl stones at an Indian police vehicle during a protest in Srinagar last month

On Tuesday India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced he would not attend the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation summit in Islamabad in November, a major snub to Pakistan.

Kashmir has been divided between India and Pakistan since they gained independence in 1947.

The Indian-controlled part has a Muslim majority and there are a number of armed separatist groups who are fighting to break free from New Delhi.

China said this week it hoped ‘Pakistan and India will strengthen channels for dialogue, appropriately handle any differences, improve bilateral relations and together protect the region’s piece and stability’ but it is widely believed to be backing Pakistan.

India recently threatened to cut off water to Pakistan from rivers it controls but it is thought to have backed off after China warned it would respond by reducing the flow of water from Himalayan rivers which end up in India.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3813139/Pakistan-Indian-fire-kills-2-Pakistani-soldiers-Kashmir.html#ixzz4LfFZRuAu
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India says it conducted “surgical strikes” on militants from Pakistan — “No more strategic restraint.”

September 29, 2016
Reuters
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By Sanjeev Miglani and Asad Hashim | NEW DELHI/ISLAMABAD
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India said on Thursday it had conducted “surgical strikes” on suspected militants preparing to infiltrate from Pakistan-ruled Kashmir, making its first direct military response to an attack on an army base it blames on Pakistan.

The cross-border action inflicted “significant casualties”, the Indian army’s head of operations told reporters in New Delhi. It was not immediately clear whether they involved any incursion by Indian troops across the Line of Control that runs through disputed Kashmir.

The Pakistani military said no such strike had taken place but that there had been an exchange of firing at the frontier.

The Indian military announcement followed through on Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s warning that those responsible “would not go unpunished” for a Sept. 18 attack on an Indian army base at Uri, near the frontier, that killed 18 soldiers.

The strikes also raised the possibility of a military escalation between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan that would wreck a 2003 Kashmir ceasefire.

Lt General Ranbir Singh, the Indian army’s director general of military operations, said the strikes were launched on Wednesday based on “very specific and credible information that some terrorist units had positioned themselves to infiltrate”.

The strikes had caused “significant casualties”, Singh also said, adding he had called his Pakistani counterpart to inform him of the casualties.

Pakistan said two of its soldiers had been killed and nine wounded in an exchange of fire across the de facto border in the Himalayan region.

“There had been cross-border fire initiated and conducted by India, which is an existential phenomenon,” the press wing of the Pakistani military said.

“As per rules of engagement same was strongly and befittingly responded by Pakistani troops.”

NO MORE STRATEGIC RESTRAINT

The Indian action represents a departure from a traditional policy of strategic restraint in the face of what New Delhi sees as cross-border terrorist acts that it believes are sponsored by the Pakistani state.

“The bigger message is that Pakistan is now on notice that cross-border attacks would be part of our response if there are any more terrorist attacks,” said former Indian air vice marshal Manmohan Bahadur.

It also comes at a particularly delicate time for Pakistan, with powerful Army Chief of Staff General Raheel Sharif due to retire shortly and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif still to decide on a successor.

The Indian stock market fell heavily on the announcement, with the benchmark NSE Index falling by up to 2 percent in Mumbai and a key “fear index” that measures volatility rising to a three-month high.

India announced its retaliation at a news conference in New Delhi that was hurriedly called, only to be delayed, as Modi chaired a meeting of his cabinet committee on security to be briefed on the operation.

“The prime minister is clear that this is exactly what we should have done,” a senior government official told Reuters on condition of anonymity. “Informing the world about the surgical strike was important today.”

SIX-HOUR EXCHANGE

Exchanges of fire took place in the Bhimber, Hot Spring, Kel and Lipa sectors in Pakistan-administered Kashmir, and lasted about six hours, the Pakistani military said earlier.

An Indian army officer in Kashmir said there had been shelling from the Pakistani side of the border into the Nowgam district, near the Line of Control, and the exchange of fire was continuing.

There were no casualties or damage reported on the Indian side of the LoC.

Both India and Pakistan claim Kashmir in full, but govern separate parts, and have fought three wars since independence from Britain in 1947, two of them over Kashmir.

Tension between the South Asian rivals has been high since an Indian crackdown on dissent in Kashmir following the killing by security forces of Burhan Wani, a young separatist leader, in July.

They rose further when New Delhi blamed Pakistan for the Uri attack, which inflicted the heaviest toll on the Indian army of any single incident in 14 years.

India has been ratcheting up pressure on Pakistan, seeking to diplomatically isolate it at the U.N. General Assembly in New York and winning expressions of condemnation from the United States, Britain and France over the attack.

China, another of the permanent members of the UN Security Council and a traditional ally of Pakistan, has urged dialogue between the two antagonists.

On Wednesday, officials from several countries said a November summit of a the South Asian regional group due to be held in Islamabad may be called off after India, Bangladesh and Afghanistan said they would not attend.

(Writing by Doug Busvine; Additional reporting by Fayaz Bukhari in SRINAGAR, Rupam Jain in NEW DELHI, Drazen Jorgic and Mehreen Zahra-Malik in ISLAMABAD.; Editing by Nick Macfie)

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India Quits Talks With Pakistan

September 27, 2016

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AFP

© AFP/File | The Kashmir region is divided between India and Pakistan but both countries claim it in full. The two nuclear-armed neighbours have fought three wars since gaining independence from British rule in 1947, two of them over Kashmir

NEW DELHI (AFP) – India on Tuesday pulled out of a key regional summit in Pakistan citing an increase in cross-border attacks, as tension between the nuclear-armed neighbours escalates.

The Indian government has accused Pakistan-based militants of launching a deadly assault on an army base in Kashmir this month that killed 18 soldiers.

Pakistan has rejected India’s claims as “unfounded and premature”.

Regional superpower India said it has conveyed its decision not to take part in the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) summit to Nepal, the current SAARC Chair.

“India has conveyed to current SAARC Chair Nepal that increasing cross-border terrorist attacks in the region…have created an environment that is not conducive to the successful holding of the 19th SAARC Summit,” the foreign ministry said in a statement.

“In the prevailing circumstances, the government of India is unable to participate in the proposed summit in Islamabad.”

India’s traditionally tense relations with Pakistan have nosedived following the attack on the army base and triggered a war of words between the neighbours.

Kashmir has been split between India and Pakistan since the end of British rule in 1947. Both claim the disputed Himalayan territory in its entirety and have fought two wars over it.

Several rebel groups have for decades fought Indian soldiers deployed in the region, demanding its independence or its merger with rival Pakistan.

Tens of thousands of people have died in the fighting, most of them civilians.

The SAARC summit, which brings together eight member states in the region, is scheduled to be held in Islamabad on November 9-10.

http://www.france24.com/en/20160927-india-pulls-out-key-summit-pakistan-govt