Posts Tagged ‘drug war’

In The Philippines: What Is The Basis of The “War on Drugs?” What is The Strategy? What Are Our Objectives?

April 26, 2017

Philippine Daily Inquirer

Letter to the Editor

OPINION / LATEST OPINION
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A war that isn’t war
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/ 12:12 AM April 26, 2017

The Holy Week pause made me think some more of the sufferings and deaths in the “war on drugs” that has made the Philippines probably the world’s bloodiest, most ruthless and most frightening country that isn’t at war. And the more I thought of the man waging it, the more I was convinced of the following:

He hasn’t studied the drug problem to any appreciable depth. He has made it his principal focus, and yet he has never elaborated on it, never elucidated its extent or the damage he says it has caused. His statement that “drugs are destroying this country” appeals to the emotion, but where are the facts? My sense: That statement may be a little more than—or nothing but—post-truth.

The lone statistic he has given—“4 million addicts”—has never been substantiated and may be untrue. No validation has come from the Philippine National Police, the Department of the Interior and Local Government or the Department of Health. A valid number could be derived only by proper quantification, using verified full-country data. No such process has been reported, and maybe there hasn’t been one. If no quantification has been done, then where did the “4 million” figure come from? My guess: He made it up. It was one of the first of the false facts that have since
proliferated.

Given the above, what is the basis for the “war on drugs”? (How can it be a “war” when only one side is armed?) The destruction that we have seen—thousands of human lives obliterated and wasted—is the horrifying response to what ugly truth? Possible answer: No truth, just an impression in the mind of someone who isn’t in the habit of going in-depth about anything.

The darkest of horrors have come to us from a mere impression? Heaven have mercy!

For the sake of the victims and their families, I hope I’m wrong. It is very painful for anybody to have a loved one get murdered, but it would be absolutely unbearable to have a loved one get murdered for something of questionable basis.

ATIS ALTAMIRANO,
atisaltamirano77@gmail.com

Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/103478/war-isnt-war#ixzz4fMOBVjJh
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

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 (Contains links to related articles)
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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image may contain: text

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines Novel Approach To Cutting Drug Abuse: Murder Users, Dealers — Now in Act II, Drug rehabilitation at the community-level with limited expertise

April 23, 2017

Duterte’s War on Drugs Stumbles in Rehabilitation Effort

Government pulls back on supersize treatment centers; focus placed on community leaders with little medical expertise

Boys undergoing drug rehabilitation are seen inside a dormitory at a government- run rehabilitation center in Taguig, near Manila, in December.

Boys undergoing drug rehabilitation are seen inside a dormitory at a government- run rehabilitation center in Taguig, near Manila, in December. PHOTO: ERIK DE CASTRO/REUTERS

MANILA—The government of Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte is giving up on supersize drug rehabilitation centers, shifting the burden of treating addicts to community-level programs with little medical expertise.

Rehabilitation was the other half of Mr. Duterte’s bloody war on drugs, a crackdown that has claimed the lives of more than 7,000 people and targeted four million addicts whom the president has said he would “be happy to slaughter.” Nearly 1.3 million addicts and dealers, told they need to surrender or face a similar fate from vigilantes and police, have presented themselves for compulsory rehabilitation.

Treating the flood of self-confessed users presents a monumental task for the government. Its retreat from supersize rehab centers, a major pillar of its rehabilitation efforts, adds to criticism that the drug war is focused on extermination rather than healing.

One reason the government is reversing course is that far fewer people than expected have been classified as sufficiently drug-dependent to be sent to the centers—an indication to some that the president has overstated the country’s methamphetamine epidemic, a drug known locally as shabu. The impoverished country has also struggled to fund its rehabilitation programs, another reason, along with the siting of centers far from patients’ families, that admissions have been low.

The government’s flagship facility north of Manila, financed by a Chinese businessman and intended to eventually hold 10,000 addicts, has only 179 patients. The existing building, finished last year in the project’s first phase with a capacity of 500, won’t be expanded, according to government officials.

“I don’t suppose that we will be continuing with the concept of mega rehab,” John Castriciones, undersecretary for operations at the Department of the Interior and Local Government, told local media this month. Mr. Castriciones’s department, which oversees community rehabilitation, didn’t respond to requests for comment on the policy change.

The government says it will still use the rehabilitation centers for the most severe addiction cases, but the vast majority of people surrendering to police will now get help from community leaders, who mental-health experts say are ill-equipped to serve them.

A former drug user underwent ventosa cupping therapy as part of a Catholic church's rehabilitation program in Quezon City, near Manila, in January.

A former drug user underwent ventosa cupping therapy as part of a Catholic church’s rehabilitation program in Quezon City, near Manila, in January. PHOTO: ROMEO RANOCO/REUTERS
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Ronnie Taguba, the head of a small community, known as a barangay, of about 4,000 people in Manila, is one such leader. Most Sundays, Mr. Taguba rises at 5 a.m. and goes jogging around the cinder-block and corrugated-iron houses of his neighborhood, followed by around 30 wheezing drug addicts. At other times, he holds zumba sessions, followed by a period of Bible study.

“We talk to them and say it’s hard to go to jail,” said Mr. Taguba, who supports the president’s drug war. “We give them protection, but say if you continue to use drugs, you will go to jail.”

After surrendering to police, self-declared drug addicts are triaged into groups by a medley of health workers, psychiatrists and doctors, based on their behavior during interviews. The most severely addicted are confined in government rehabilitation camps, run by medical professionals, where they participate in a recovery program involving strict daily routines.

Delfin Gubatan, who runs a government rehabilitation center in Dagupan, north of Manila, said all residential patients at his 300-bed facility complete their course and 76% of them remain drug-free in the 18 months after completion. Courses typically last six months or more.

A participant works on a religious Mother and Child figurine as part of a drug addiction rehabilitation programme in a Catholic church in Quezon city, metro Manila, Philippines January 14, 2017.

A participant works on a religious Mother and Child figurine as part of a drug addiction rehabilitation programme in a Catholic church in Quezon city, metro Manila, Philippines January 14, 2017. PHOTO: ROMEO RANOCO/REUTERS
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The government said last year it would increase the budget for rehabilitation by five times to three billion Philippine pesos ($60 million) in 2017. No figures are available for the security costs involved in Mr. Duterte’s war on drugs.

The president in public has largely focused on police efforts to rid the country of shabu drug addicts and dealers. Government officials routinely say the country has as many as four million drug users, although the Philippines’ Dangerous Drugs Board counted 1.8 million drug users in the 100 million population in a 2015 study.

The campaign’s carnage has been decried by opposition parties, the country’s Roman Catholic Church and human-rights organizations, but hasn’t dented the president’s approval ratings, which consistently poll as high as 80%.

Supporters say he is ridding the country of a scourge that has destroyed families and fueled corruption.

Guilermo Gomez, a recovering drug addict who is a program director at Bridges of Hope, a private rehabilitation center in Manila, said the government needs to broaden its approaching to treating drug abusers.

“You have to attend to the survivors,” he said, noting that successful rehabilitation requires the government to deal with the social issues that lead to addiction, like poverty. “We can rehabilitate a million—we can—but not instantaneously. Not in three years.”

Psychiatrists warn that many of the local community methods of rehabilitation such as exercise classes are ineffective when dealing with drug addiction no matter how much money is being spent.

“In the Philippines now everyone is an expert in addiction,” said Fareda Flores, president of the Philippine Psychiatric Association, who said she is concerned about reports that misguided local leaders are resorting to publicly shaming drug addicts as a treatment method. “We believe that addiction is an illness, a disorder, so there is really no benefit from that kind of treatment.”

Write to Jake Maxwell Watts at jake.watts@wsj.com

https://www.wsj.com/articles/dutertes-war-on-drugs-stumbles-in-rehabilitation-effort-1492945201?=e2fb&mod=e2fb

Related:

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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image may contain: text

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Presidential Spokesman Calls 7,000 Extrajudicial Killings “Fake News” (It’s actually more like 9,000) — Further Erodes Credibility of Philippine Government, Philippine National Police (PNP)

April 21, 2017
Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella called reports on more than 7,000 extralegal killings “false news.” PCOO/King Rodriguez

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte’s spokesperson on Friday called reports of nearly 9,000 drug-related deaths “false news,” months after media organizations and international groups used the figure in their reports.

Ernesto Abella, the presidential spokesperson, said that the persistent reports of more 7,000 killed, which is now said to be nearly 9,000, was “false news” as the Philippine National Police (PNP) said that the figure was much lower.

“On the number of extrajudicial deaths, the persistent news reports of 7,000 killed, which is now being said to be close to 9,000, is false,” Abella said.

The president’s spokesperson said that based on official police data there were only 6,011 homicide cases being investigated. Of the figure, only 1,398 cases were found to be drug related, contrary to reports that 9,000 have already been killed in anti-illegal drugs operations, Abella said.

Abella, meanwhile, called on organizations which report on drug incidents to be fair and not to rush to judgment as he emphasized that people appreciated the changes being implemented by the administration and the way these were carried out.

“We ask to be understood not just from a single perspective, but from the point of view of Filipinos who desire change, stability and fairness,” Abella said.

The number of murders and homicide cases, however, have risen dramatically at the start of the Duterte administration last year despite government’s denial that they are related to the brutal war on drugs. Drug experts also acknowledge that stringent law enforcement policy against narcotics have historically resulted in unnecessary violence and deaths.

Abella’s comments came days after a Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed that public satisfaction with the government’s conduct of the war on drugs plunging by 11 points, from +77 in December 2016 to +66 in March 2017.

He also assuaged American concern on the increasing extrajudicial killings in the Philippines, saying that those who breached protocol would be made to account.

“We share the concern of US Assistant Secretary of State for Southeast Asia Patrick Murphy, who has been quoted in the media saying ‘there are elements of the drug war that are operating outside the rule of law,’” the spokesperson said.

Abella said that the PNP has an Internal Affairs Service which would probe into cases of police violations.

“This body can suspend or dismiss PNP personnel based on violations incurred and can recommend the filing of criminal charges,” he said.

He said that security forces followed procedures in conducting their operations although force may be used to protect the safety of the police.

“Local authorities follow operation protocols and the proper enforcement of our laws requires the use of reasonable force merited by the attendant circumstances,” he said.

Not a single cop, however, has been accused by police investigators before a court of unjustifiably killing drug suspects in police operations. President Rodrigo Duterte himself said he will defend and pardon cops accused of wrongdoing in the field.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/04/21/1692511/abella-calls-7000-extrajudicial-killings-fake-news

Related:

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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image may contain: text

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

 

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

 

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: National Police killings ‘committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack against a civilian population’ — ‘Reign of terror’ — ‘Extermination’ — Insiders talking to evidence gatherers for the International Criminal Court

April 18, 2017
At least 39 people were killed in police operations during Holy Week as Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa proved true to his word that there would be no Lenten break in the war on drugs. AP/Bullit Marquez, file
  • Almost 9,000 people killed since President Rodrigo Duterte took office in June
  • Two senior officials have claimed that police orchestrated many of those killings 
  • Police paid to kill drug suspects and – for 10,000 pesos ($200) a head – rapists, pickpockets, swindlers, gang members, alcoholics and other ‘troublemakers’

The Philippine police have given bonuses for killing drug suspects, planted evidence at crime scenes and carried out most of the murders they blamed on vigilantes, said two senior officers.

The officials, who are critical of President Rodrigo Duterte’s ‘war on drugs,’ challenged the government’s explanations of the killings in interviews.

Almost 9,000 people, many small-time users and dealers, have been killed since Duterte took office on June 30. Police say about a third of the victims were shot by officers in self-defence during legitimate anti-drug operations.

Human rights monitors believe the remaining two thirds were killed by paid assassins working with police or by police disguised as vigilantes – a charge the police deny.

Philippine police have received cash payments for executing drug suspects, planted evidence at crime scenes and carried out most of the killings they have long blamed on vigilantes, claim officials critical of President Rodrigo Duterte's (pictured) 'war on drugs'

Philippine police have received cash payments for executing drug suspects, planted evidence at crime scenes and carried out most of the killings they have long blamed on vigilantes, claim officials critical of President Rodrigo Duterte’s (pictured) ‘war on drugs’

The two senior officers, one a retired police intelligence officer and the other an active-duty commander, claimed the killings are in fact orchestrated by the police, including most of those carried out by vigilantes. They spoke on the condition of anonymity.

‘It is the Philippine National Police doing it,’ said the retired intelligence officer.

‘This killing machine must be buried six feet under the ground.’ He said he was angry about the impact of the killings on police discipline and wanted ‘to put Duterte on the defensive.’ Reuters was unable to independently verify if the police are behind vigilante killings.

The president’s office and the Philippine police did not respond to questions from Reuters.

The intelligence officer has authored an unpublished 26-page report on the conduct of the drug war in an effort to organize opposition to Duterte’s campaign.

The report, titled ‘The State-Sponsored Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines,’ provides granular detail on the campaign’s alleged methods, masterminds and perpetrators. The document has been shared with leaders of the Catholic Church in the Philippines and with the government-funded Commission on Human Rights.

Some of the report’s accusations against individuals could not be confirmed by Reuters; the news agency is therefore not publishing the full document.

Many of its findings, however, support and expand upon previous investigations of the drug war by Reuters and independent human rights monitors.

Human rights monitors believe paid assassins operating with police backing or by police disguised as vigilantes killed two thirds of the 9,000 people who have died since June 30 - a charge police deny

Human rights monitors believe paid assassins operating with police backing or by police disguised as vigilantes killed two thirds of the 9,000 people who have died since June 30 – a charge police deny

The report claims that police are paid to kill not just drug suspects, but also – for 10,000 pesos ($200) a head – rapists, pickpockets, swindlers, gang members, alcoholics and other ‘troublemakers.’

It also claims that civilian members of the so-called Davao Death Squad, which rights activists allege killed hundreds of people in Duterte’s hometown of Davao, were drafted to ‘augment and assist’ the police’s current nationwide anti-drug operation.

The report doesn’t provide documentary evidence for its accusations, which the intelligence officer said were based on accounts from 17 serving or former policemen, including the commander Reuters interviewed. The police commander said he agreed to talk because he was upset that authorities are targeting only petty drug suspects. ‘Why aren’t they killing the suppliers?’ he asked. ‘Only the poor are dying.’

The second half of the report is largely political in nature, asserting that Duterte has close ties to Communist forces in the Philippines. Many in the military and police are concerned by what they see as Duterte’s leftist sympathies. Since taking office, the president has released Communist rebels from prison to restart peace talks.

The report also calls the drug war a ‘social cleansing’ campaign similar to that launched in Mao Zedong’s China, with Duterte aiming to have drug addicts ‘physically eliminated.’

The Commission on Human Rights has reviewed the report and the accounts could open up new leads in ongoing investigations, said chairman Chito Gascon. Church officials confirmed receiving the report as well.

A report claims that police are paid to kill not just drug suspects, but also - for 10,000 pesos ($200) a head - rapists, pickpockets, swindlers, gang members, alcoholics and other 'troublemakers' (pictured, police interrogating local residents in operation against drugs

A report claims that police are paid to kill not just drug suspects, but also – for 10,000 pesos ($200) a head – rapists, pickpockets, swindlers, gang members, alcoholics and other ‘troublemakers’ (pictured, police interrogating local residents in operation against drugs

‘We should do all we can to follow any lead that could ultimately shed light on these killings with the view to ultimately holding the perpetrators to account,’ said Gascon.

The fresh claims come amid growing criticism of the drug war. In February, the country’s influential Catholic Church called it a ‘reign of terror.’ The campaign has also sparked street protests and lawsuits.

Duterte’s police chief, Ronald Dela Rosa, halted police operations for most of February after it emerged that an anti-drug unit had kidnapped and murdered a South Korean businessman last year. The killings continued but at a slower pace. On March 6, Dela Rosa announced that the police were resuming their drug operations.

In March, a former policeman, Arturo Lascanas, testified in the Philippine Senate about his role in vigilante-style killings in the southern city of Davao, where Duterte was once mayor. Lascanas was the second Senate witness to link Duterte to the Davao Death Squad. Duterte denies ordering any killings, either as president or mayor.

In a subsequent interview, Lascanas told Reuters that for over a decade he was paid for carrying out the liquidation of drug suspects and criminals. In the early 1990s, he said, he was paid 3,000 to 5,000 pesos ($60-$100) for each of the ‘jobs’ he performed.

By the early 2000s he was earning tens of thousands of pesos for each operation, he said. Lascanas said he had no documentary proof of the payments. He has since left the country.

In the past nine months, police acknowledge having shot dead more than 2,600 suspects during their operations. They say such shootings occur after suspects open fire on undercover officers trying to catch them dealing drugs.

It also claims that civilian members of the so-called Davao Death Squad, which rights activists allege killed hundreds of people in Duterte's hometown of Davao, were drafted to 'augment and assist' the police's current nationwide anti-drug operation. Pictured, Duterte with Trade Secretary Liam Fox)

It also claims that civilian members of the so-called Davao Death Squad, which rights activists allege killed hundreds of people in Duterte’s hometown of Davao, were drafted to ‘augment and assist’ the police’s current nationwide anti-drug operation. Pictured, Duterte with UK Trade Secretary Liam Fox

But these so-called ‘buy-busts’ are actually well-planned executions, said the commander interviewed by Reuters. The commander said targets are chosen from lists of suspects drawn up by police and local officials, who later coordinate to unplug security cameras in the neighbourhood where a killing is planned. According to the report, street lamps are also switched off.

‘There is no such thing as a legitimate buy-bust,’ the commander said. ‘The dealers know the cops and won’t sell to them.’

Instead, he said, a team of police operatives will execute the target, who is almost always unarmed, then plant guns and drugs at the crime scene to justify the use of deadly force.

‘We have to plant evidence for the legality of the operation,’ the commander said. ‘We are ordered to do these operations, so we have to protect ourselves.’

The commander said officers put the gun in the dead suspect’s hand and pull the trigger with the victim’s finger so forensic testing will show that the suspect fired a gun.

Late last year, he said, police crime-scene investigators told their fellow officers to place the guns at a slight distance from the suspects, rather than in their hands, to make things look more realistic.

Most drug suspects in his precinct are shot by rookie cops who are either eager for the experience or nominated by their superiors, the commander said. The superiors refer to this as a ‘baptism by fire.’

Each member of the team is quickly paid according to two factors, said the commander: his role in the killing and the target’s value.

According to the report, the cash ‘reward scales’ for drug killings range from 20,000 pesos ($400) for a ‘street level pusher and user,’ to 50,000 pesos for a member of a neighborhood council, one million pesos for ‘distributors, retailers and wholesalers,’ and five million for ‘drug lords.’

Police officers kill for money, said the commander, but also out of fear: Even the police are afraid of being included on a ‘watch list’ of drug suspects drawn up by police and local officials.

Officials have been killed for not cooperating, he added. He said he was aware of two cases but did not provide details on exactly what happened.

Most drug suspects in his precinct are shot by rookie cops who are either eager for the experience or nominated by their superiors, the commander said. Pictured, armed Filipino policemen stand guard next to the wall of a prison facility

Most drug suspects in his precinct are shot by rookie cops who are either eager for the experience or nominated by their superiors, the commander said. Pictured, armed Filipino policemen stand guard next to the wall of a prison facility

Reuters reported last year that the watch lists were effectively hit lists, with many of those named ending up dead. Another Reuters investigation showed that police officers were killing 97 percent of the suspects they confront in violent buy-bust operations, the strongest evidence yet that the police were summarily executing suspects.

Officers also cooperate because they know the police force’s flawed disciplinary system, which fails to adequately investigate even a fraction of the killings, means there is little chance they will get caught, said the intelligence officer.

One sign of the drug war’s success, says the government, is that more than a million users and pushers have voluntarily registered with the police, a process known as ‘surrendering.’

But the commander said police are given a quota of ‘surrenderers,’ and fill it by using city ordinances to arrest men who are drunk or shirtless – a misdemeanor known as ‘half-naked’ – then forcing them to register as drug suspects.

Reuters learned of the intelligence officer’s 26-page report from him and interviewed two Catholic priests in Manila who said they had encouraged him to compile it. One of the priests said he edited the report; the other said he helped distribute it among a small group of clerics and human rights activists. Both are helping organize opposition to Duterte’s drug campaign.

The Church’s initial reluctance to criticize Duterte’s drug war was prompted by a desire to ‘give him a chance’ when he took office, said one of the priests. But the killings, along with the president’s overtures to Communists, made many in the Church feel their values were under attack, he said.

The intelligence officer said he hoped the report would be used as evidence at the International Criminal Court. In October, the Hague-based tribunal said it could prosecute suspects if the killings were ‘committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack against a civilian population.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4421430/Police-kill-rewards-staged-crime-scenes-Dutertes-drug-war.html#ixzz4ecS4W7LE
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

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Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl looks like it has been put out with the trash…..
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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

 

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High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

 

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Catholic Church will participate in the establishment of community-based rehabilitation centers for drug users in at least 20 parishes in Metro Manila.

April 18, 2017
/ 05:20 PM April 18, 2017
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Despite the rocky relationship between President Duterte and the Catholic Church, the religious sector and some government institutions will work together “to win the war against illegal drugs.”

The Catholic Church and concerned government agencies are set to discuss on Wednesday how to speed up the establishment of community-based rehabilitation centers for drug users in at least 20 parishes in Metro Manila.

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo and members of some laity organizations will meet with representatives from different government agencies at the Pope Pius XII Catholic Center in Manila, according to Interior Assistant Secretary Epimaco Densing III.

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Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo

The government agencies joining the meeting are the Department of the Interior and Local Government, Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (Tesda), Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), Philippine National Police (PNP), and the Department of Health (DOH).

“We will be meeting so that we can discuss the community-based rehab centers that we will put up immediately. This is ASAP,” Densing said in an ambush interview on Tuesday.

The target is to have rehabilitation centers in at least 20 parishes  which can accommodate drug abusers from around 80 to 90 barangays, said Densing.

The community centers are included in the “out-patient component” of the government’s drug rehabilitation efforts as it will mostly admit the “experimenters” or those who use drugs once a week or once a month.

Asked about the funding, Densing said parishes will help raise the money to support the community-based centers, aside from the government budget that was allotted for the barangay anti-drug abuse councils (Badac).

“Once we’ve established the community-based rehab centers, we might require the barangays to put in some of their Badac budgets to support the community-based rehab centers. So it’s both a government and non-government (effort),” he said.

Densing said parishes will provide personnel to run the center while the government will provide supplemental needs like skills training care of Tesda, classification of drug surrenderers by the DOH, after-care program from the DSWD while the DILG and local government units will provide additional support.

As for the patients, the assistant secretary said they will get the list of “Tokhang” surrenderers from the PNP and the barangays.

“Hindi pa pinag-uusapan (We have not discussed it) in detail, but definitely there will [be] a strategy to ask the surrenderer to undertake the community rehab center,” he said.

If the program becomes successful, Densing hopes that other faith-based organizations can follow suit all over the country.

“That’s why we’re expediting this. We’re taking away all the red tape in organizing. When we met with Bishop Pabillo, the first thing I told them was to forget about all the paperwork. Let’s just put this into a running program and then maybe later on the paperwork will follow,” he said.

“Kung ito kasama natin ang simbahan, ang private sector at LGUs (If the church, the private sector and LGUs are on our side), I’m quite sure we will [win] the war against drugs,” Densing added./ac /rga

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/890088/drug-rehab-centers-to-be-put-up-in-metro-manila-parishes#ixzz4eb7yCkkm
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Chris Christie takes on role in Trump’s fight against opioids — “I am pro-life and that means we believe in the sanctity of human life.” — “Everyone has a right to the help that they need.”

March 29, 2017

BY REBECCA SAVRANSKY

The Hill

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Chris Christie. Getty Images

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will take on a role in President Trump’s White House to combat the country’s opioid epidemic, ABC News reported, citing White House officials.

A draft order, obtained by Politico, talks about forming a commission to make recommendations related to treatment and law connected to opioid addiction.

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The president often talked about tackling the country’s opioid epidemic during his campaign.

Christie was a strong supporter of Trump after dropping his own presidential bid last year. He headed Trump’s transition team for some time before being ousted from that role shortly after Trump’s victory and replaced with Vice President Mike Pence.

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“My brother Fred was a great guy. He had everything. I mean, the most handsome guy, and then he got hooked — and there was nothing, there was nothing we could do about it.”

— Donald Trump

 

He has been long rumored for a job in the Trump administration and said last year that he turned down several offers to serve in the White House.

During an interview earlier this year, the New Jersey governor said he doesn’t expect to be asked to serve in the Trump administration.

“I have absolutely no intention, nor any understanding, that I will be asked to be in the administration in the years to come,” Christie said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“My view is, I have got a job to do as governor, and then my intention is to go off to the private sector and to help support my family.”

The president told The Wall Street Journal during a past interview that “at some point, we’re going to do something with Chris.”

Last month, the New Jersey governor dined with the president at the White House, where they discussed the country’s opioid epidemic.

Christie last month signed a series of bills related to the crisis, including one requiring state-regulated insurance plans to cover treatment for opioid addiction.

Related:

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Chris Christie. AP Photo

Chris Christie appeared Wednesday morning, March 29, 2017, to talk about his new role working for President Trump in the effort to find solutions for America’s opioid epidemic. Christie said he believes in the worth of every human being and the sanctity of human life — that every human being has some spark of God within. He said this means he is pro-life and we, as a people, should not turn our backs on the addicted, the aged or anyone else.

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Hospital patient's hands folded in lap, close-up

“We cannot leave the elderly behind.”

Related:

http://addictionblog.org/infographics/donald-trump-quotes-on-addiction-substance-abuse-and-the-war-on-drugs/

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Philippines Vice President: “Speaking up about killings not a destabilization move.”

March 23, 2017
Dissent against extrajudicial killings of ordinary people should not be construed as an attempt to destabilize the Duterte administration
By: – Reporter / @deejayapINQ
/ 01:31 PM March 23, 2017

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2016 file photo, Philippine Vice President Leni Robredo answers questions from the media during a news conference following her resignation from her cabinet post under President Rodrigo Duterte in suburban Quezon city, south of Manila, Philippines. The Philippine vice president has raised alarms over the president's bloody crackdown against illegal drugs, which she says can't be solved "with bullets alone," and she also asked Filipinos to "defy brazen incursions on their rights." The comments are one of Robredo's sharpest critiques so far of President Rodrigo Duterte's campaign and are likely to antagonize him because they are intended for an international forum of human rights advocates, whom he has often lambasted. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

Vice President Leni Robredo (AP FILE PHOTO/ BULLIT MARQUEZ)

MANILA — Dissent against extrajudicial killings of ordinary people should not be construed as an attempt to destabilize the Duterte administration or a desire to replace President Duterte, Vice President Leni Robredo said on Thursday.

“When we verbalize dissent, it doesn’t mean we want to replace the President. We think removing a President by impeachment or whatever means, we won’t accomplish anything anymore,” she told reporters, breaking her silence on moves in Congress to impeach her.

Robredo met with her supporters from civil society and urban poor groups at the Office of the Vice President headquarters in Quezon City, where she addressed for the first time the impeachment complaint submitted by two Marcos loyalists for the endorsement of Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez.

“Impeachment whether against the President or me would put a halt to the things Congress should focus on. It is going to be very divisive in our country. It won’t be good in the long run,” she said.

She acknowledged brickbats that came her way after she sent a video to a United Nations-affiliated side event giving a stinging rebuke of the government’s war on drugs. In the same video message, she also exposed a “palit-ulo” scheme, in which law enforcers searching for drug suspects would allow a blood exchange with family members or other people connected to them.

“In the past days, it has been hard on us because of the video message, but we never said anything that was not true,” she said.

Asked to comment on President Duterte’s remark asking his allies to “let her be,” Robredo said that would be in the best interest of the nation.

She, however, cautioned the President not to read any ulterior motives in her words of criticism.

“I have always been for working together. Only our dissent is being misinterpreted as destabilization,” she said.

“By working together, it doesn’t mean we agree on everything. But disagreement should not be seen as our desire to replace him,” Robredo said.

“Our expression of dissent doesn’t mean we want to get back at the President. We want to be heard because we feel strongly about certain things, like the killing of ordinary people,” she said.

Robredo also addressed the bitter fighting between her supporters and Duterte’s.

“I think it’s not productive. It wastes a lot of our time, and it encourages a culture of hate among everyone,” she said.  SFM/rga

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/883116/speaking-up-vs-killings-not-a-destabilization-move-robredo#ixzz4c7xkLUa7
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Philippines complains that drug war killings and police corruption scare off tourists

March 22, 2017

AFP

© AFP/File | Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte was elected last year after promising during the campaign to eradicate drugs in society by killing tens of thousands of people

BANGKOK (AFP) – The Philippines tourism secretary urged the media Wednesday to “tone down” coverage of President Rodrigo Duterte’s deadly drug war, complaining that reports on extrajudicial killings were scaring away foreigners.

On a trip to Thailand accompanying Duterte, Tourism Secretary Wanda Teo insisted the Philippines was a safe destination but said journalists were making the country a hard sell because of their focus on the killings.

“Help us because you know, it’s really difficult for me to sell the Philippines, especially when extrajudicial killings becomes the topic,” Teo told Filipino reporters following the Duterte entourage.

Teo said tour operators abroad were “always” asking her about the issue, citing Asia and Europe as regions where people were particularly concerned.

“To the media, please tone down a little the extrajudicial killing (reports),” she said.

Duterte was elected last year after promising during the campaign to eradicate drugs in society by killing tens of thousands of people.

Since he took office nearly nine months ago, police have reported killing 2,594 people in the drug war while rights groups say thousands more have been killed in a state-sanctioned campaign of mass murder.

While most of those killed have been poor people living in slums, some foreigners have also died.

Duterte briefly suspended all police from the crackdown in January after it was revealed anti-drugs officers used the drug war as cover for kidnapping and murdering a South Korean businessman.

But, after describing the police force as “corrupt to the core”, Duterte brought it back a month later and vowed to continue the crackdown until all drug traffickers were off the streets or killed.

Duterte has over the past year become a well-known figure internationally because of the drug war and his caustic rhetoric against critics.

Duterte this week boasted that calling then-US president Barack Obama a “son of a whore” had made him famous.

He then used more foul language to respond to criticism from European lawmakers of the drug war, and called them “crazies”.

The Philippines, despite picturesque tropical islands and spectacular mountains, has long lagged behind its neighbours as a tourist destination.

This is partly due to decades-long Muslim and communist insurgencies, as well as frequent kidnappings of foreigners by Islamic militants.

About 5.9 million tourists visited the Philippines last year, compared with 32.6 million for Thailand.

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Philippine President Rages: Is He Unhinged?

March 20, 2017

‘Don’t f*** with us!’ Philippine President RAGES at European Union in FURIOUS tirade

PHILIPPINE President Rodrigo Duterte has warned the European Parliament “don’t f*** with us” after he was condemned for his plans to reinstate the death penalty.

PUBLISHED: 09:25, Mon, Mar 20, 2017 | UPDATED: 12:52, Mon, Mar 20, 2017
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President of the Philippines warns EU: ‘Don’t f*** with us’
The extraordinary rant came as bigwigs passed a resolution criticising the leader’s tough stance on drug convicts last week.European lawmakers said they were “deeply alarmed” by the reintroduction of the death penalty – adding capital punishment is considered “cruel and inhuman”.

Responding to the remarks, Mr Duterte, who previously referred to , once again used colourful language to berate the European Parliament.

Rodrigo DuterteANC

Rodrigo Duterte launched into a extraordinary rant directed at the European Parliament

Why do you have to f*** with us, goddamn it?”

Rodrigo Duterte

“I’ll talk in English,” he told Filipino ex-pats on a two-day visit to Myanmar. “Do not impose your culture or your belief in what would be a government in this planet.“Do not impose on other countries, especially us. Why don’t you mind your own business? Why do you have to f*** with us, goddamn it?”

Since taking office in July 2016, the Filipino president has taken a hard approach to policing.

Rodrigo Duterte GETTY

Rodrigo Duterte wants to reinstate the death penalty for drug convicts

A bloody drugs war has embroiled on the streets since, killing more than 7,000 people, with many of the dead suspected dealers and alleged drug addicts.Earlier this month, the country’s house of representatives approved a version of the death penalty bill.

The draft legislation, which needs the approval of senate, will allow the execution of drug convicts by hanging, firing squad or lethal injection.

Nuttall: EU’s a political monster determined to destroy nation states

 Shocking images depict Philippines’ war on drugs
A resolution by EU lawmakers criticised the Asian country, arguing the death penalty “fails to act as a deterrent to criminal behaviour”.The body also called for the release of Philippine senator Leila de Lima, who was arrested in last month of drug trafficking charges which the EU said are “almost entirely fabricated”.

Ms De Lima was arrested last month on drug-related charges after strongly criticising the Filipino president Rodrigo Duterte’s hardline war on drugs.

The EU expressed concerns, noting that Amnesty International “regards senator De Lima as a prisoner of conscience”.

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The fiery outburst from Mr Duterte comes as Downing Street revealed Theresa May will talks next week.The UK prime minister is set to begin Brexit on March 29, beginning to two-year negotiating process.

Sir Tim Barrow, Britain’s ambassador to the EU, informed the office of European Council President Donald Tusk on Monday.

Following the news, Brexit Secretary David Davis said the country was now on the “threshold of the most importation negotiation” for a generation.

“The Government is clear in its aims: a deal that works for every nation and region of the UK and indeed for all of Europe – a new, positive partnership between the UK and our friends and allies in the EU,” Mr Davis said.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/781354/Philippine-President-swears-European-Union-death-penalty

Related:

China is more than willing to share the Philippines with Filipinos, Beijing says — And Vietnam?

March 20, 2017

By Alan Robles

OPINION

Posted at Mar 20 2017 04:18 PM

China is more than willing to share the Philippines with Filipinos, Beijing said yesterday.

According to official China spokesperson Rodrigo Duterte, “there’s no need to be greedy, there is more than enough Philippines to go around.”

“Equal shares with equal brothers,” he added.

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte reacts during a press conference at the Malacanang presidential palace in Manila, Philippines on Monday, March 13, 2017. AP/Aaron Favila
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The spokesperson said China was making the “generous offer in the light of the extra warm relations between our countries.” The announcement came after the two countries signed a groundbreaking agreement called the “Extra Close Special Luv Kiss Kiss” treaty.

Part of the agreement will see the Philippines receiving billions of yuan in loans, a national railway called the China’s Durable Railroad (CDR) and fentanyl.

“We particularly value the fentanyl,” said a Filipino diplomat who asked not to be identified.

Tabs of fentanyl, manufactured to look like prescription pills, are seen in a synthetic drug-testing lab at the Drug Enforcement Agency's Special Testing and Research Lab in Sterling, Va. in 2016

Tabs of fentanyl, manufactured to look like prescription pills, are seen in a synthetic drug-testing lab at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency’s Special Testing and Research Lab in Sterling, Va. in 2016.  PHOTO: T.J. KIRKPATRICK FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
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The Philippines promises (among other things) to stop using the name “West Philippine Sea” (WPS) and instead adopt the “proper nomenclature” – “Very Much China’s Sea Oh Yes Indeedy” (VMCSOYI).

China, for its part, will invest heavily in the Philippines and buy more products such as bananas, copies of the Duterte Manifesto, and Filipino entertainment series. One Chinese politician said, “China would like to the rights to that famous comedy show, ‘The Senate Hearings.’ It’s a big hit in Beijing.”

Chinese officials “strenuously” denied rumors the Philippines had actually turned itself over to China, which officially responded with a statement, “Awww you shouldn’t have, but thanks.”

“That is clearly nonsense,” one Beijing diplomat assured. “What’s ours is ours and what’s yours is ours.”

Image result for oil rig, china flag, photos

China announced that on this historic occasion, as a sign of its “fraternal ties” with Manila, China would waive all fees to Filipinos swimming on the beaches off Lingayan.

“Offer valid for summer only, terms may apply,” a Chinese official said, off the record.

A senior Chinese leader told a press conference, “and if you’re extra good and well behaved, we’ll even let you share the resources of Benham Rise.”

Told by one reporter that Benham Rise is on the Pacific side of the Philippines, well outside the South China Sea, the Chinese leader made a cutting motion on his throat and the reporter was dragged away screaming.

“Next question please,” the official said.

Spokesperson Duterte expressed confidence that with “mutual confidence and more hard work” Manila would acknowledge China’s “indisputable” rights to the Pacific Ocean, the North Pole, the aurora borealis and the Moon.

Philippine diplomats declared the country was more than prepared to assert its rights in the strongest ways, which would follow two tracks: the first would consist of “strong declarations” made in the “loudest possible whisper” in a deep dark basement in Malacañang Palace.

“With the door closed and the lights out,” one undersecretary stressed.

The second track would consist of shooting more Filipinos.

“Why not, we’ve been very successful at it,” the undersec shrugged.

Beijing said it was “pleased” the agreement frees the Philippines from the “onerous” job of defending territory, letting it focus on really crucial priorities, such as training more world class professional boxers to become idiot senators.

In fact, spokesperson Duterte said, “China doesn’t see what the Philippines needs a military for. Get rid of that thing. Nothing to defend.”

A junketing member of the Philippine delegation said the agreement was a “win-win” because “this will avoid an unnecessary bloody war.”

“Because as we all know, the only way you settle territorial disputes is by bloody war. It says so right here in the “Duterte Manual of Negotiation and Tokhang.”

The Philippine delegation said it was “overcome with gratitude” for Beijing’s generosity.

“On behalf of the Philippines we thank you,” Philippine president Rodrigo said.

“You’re welcome”, China spokesperson Duterte replied.

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http://www.hotmanila.ph/