Posts Tagged ‘food shortages’

Brazil Reaches New Deal to End Truck Drivers’ Strike Seven-day strike left most gas stations in the country without fuel

May 28, 2018

Seven-day strike left most gas stations in the country without fuel

Truckers strike at Regis Bittencourt Highway in Embu, Brazil, on Sunday.
Truckers strike at Regis Bittencourt Highway in Embu, Brazil, on Sunday. PHOTO: MAURÍCIO RUMMENS/ZUMA PRESS

SÃO PAULO—The Brazilian government reached a new agreement with truck drivers on Sunday to end a seven-day strike that left many businesses without vital supplies and most gas stations in the country without fuel.

The government has agreed to a discount in diesel prices that will be in place for 60 days and to sign a bill that will allow truckers not to pay toll on rear axles when not in use, among other concessions, Brazilian President Michel Temer said during a televised speech Sunday night.

This is the second agreement announced by the government in an attempt to end the strike. Last week, the government said several truckers’ unions had agreed to suspend the strike, but one of the biggest groups representing drivers, the Brazilian Association of Truckers (Abcam), rejected the deal.

Brazilian truck drivers began the stoppage on May 21, asking the government to cut taxes on diesel fuel after a recent spike in prices.

The government brought in the military to help clear the roads on Friday, but many truckers remained off the job, threatening an already weak economy.

Over the weekend, local media reported that armed forces were escorting fuel trucks to supply some essential services. But several Brazilian airports are without fuel and supermarkets are reporting shortage of some fresh products, while farmers say millions of animals may die in the coming days due to lack of feed.

Write to Luciana Magalhães at Luciana.Magalhaes@wsj.com

https://www.wsj.com/articles/brazil-reaches-new-deal-to-end-truck-drivers-strike-1527473754

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Brazil cuts fuel prices after strike leaves food, fuel scarce

May 28, 2018

 

Brazil’s President Michel Temer, under pressure from a week-long national truckers’ strike which led to fuel and food shortages, ceded to protesters’ demands Sunday and slashed the cost of diesel.

The cut, equal to 0.46 reais a liter, was to be locked in place for 60 days, the president said in televised remarks, as the strike paralyzes much of the country’s economic infrastructure.

Temer also agreed to four other demands truckers made.

© AFP / by Louis GENOT | Members of the Brazilian Military Police and Sao Paulo’s traffic police stand beside a truck with a windscreen reading “military intervention,” during an operation to clear a road blocked by striking truckers

His decision came after Sergio Etchegoyen, the Minister of Institutional Security, said the country was “on a path to normalization” although he added: “It’s not quick.”

Authorities deployed the military to clear barricades erected by strikers and have been escorting fuel trucks since Friday to maintain access to refineries.

But federal transportation police reported that as of Saturday night, nearly 600 roads were at least partially blocked throughout the sprawling South American country.

Gas stations were virtually out of fuel, and perishable foods were disappearing from store shelves.

Now, Temer said: “we have done our part to ease the problems and suffering,” mentioning that he heard reports that millions of animals could die of hunger if the crisis did not ease.

The average price of diesel was 3.36 reais (92 US cents) in January and rose to 3.6 before the strike, according to news portal G1. On May 26, it hit 3.8.

Brazil is a member of the G20 group of the world’s largest emerging and advanced economies, but the first five days of the strike were estimated to have cost the country’s economy $2.8 billion, according to the daily Folha de Sao Paulo.

The truckers put a stranglehold on movement of goods in Brazil to protest increases in fuel prices.

Prices have risen under a politically sensitive decision made in late 2016 to allow the state-run Petrobras oil giant autonomy to set its pricing.

The rise in world oil prices in recent weeks has also been a factor.

The truckers’ determination has been a heavy blow to Temer’s center-right government, five months ahead of the presidential election.

Trucks move 60 percent of the goods that are transported in Brazil, and a protracted strike could cause havoc as it emerges from a 2015-16 recession.

Priority is being given to airports, power plants, and the supply of medical facilities, where the system for transferring organs for transplant was paralyzed by the strike.

In Rio, the city’s articulated bus system was partially disrupted because of a lack of fuel.

Bus lines in other states were also forced to shut on Saturday.

Service was restored after fuel trucks arrived, but buses were operating at 20 percent capacity on Sunday.

In most big Brazilian cities, only emergency bus service functioned on Sunday, to save fuel for the start of the work week on Monday, when state universities have announced they will be closed.

The truckers have pressed on with the strike despite an agreement announced by the government with union representatives late Thursday to call a 15-day suspension.

At that time the government pledged to abolish at least one tax on diesel and implement subsidies to maintain a temporary 10 percent fuel price reduction announced Wednesday by state oil company Petrobras.

by Louis GENOT
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AFP

U.S. mulls sanctions on Venezuela to put pressure on Maduro

March 1, 2018

Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Trump administration is considering sanctioning a Venezuelan military-run oil services company and restricting insurance coverage for Venezuelan oil shipments to ratchet up pressure on socialist President Nicolas Maduro, a U.S. official said on Wednesday.

Image result for President Nicolas Maduro, photos

President Nicolas Maduro. Screengrab from video

With Maduro running for another term in an April election that Washington and its allies oppose as a sham, the United States is weighing sanctions that would target Venezuela’s vital oil sector beyond what has been done before, the official told Reuters. Some measures could come before the vote and others could be imposed afterwards.

The official, who is close to U.S. internal deliberations on Venezuela policy and spoke on condition of anonymity, would not rule out an eventual full-scale ban on Venezuelan oil shipments to the United States, among the toughest of oil-related sanctions.

“I think (it would cause) a fairly strong shock to the oil market in the short term,” the official said.

The official stressed that no decisions have been made and that any U.S. action would take into consideration potential harm to ordinary Venezuelans, already suffering from food shortages and hyperinflation, and the country’s neighbors as well as the impact on the U.S. oil industry and American consumers.

Venezuela was the fourth largest supplier of crude oil and products to the United States in 2017, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Its crude oil sales to the United States last year were the lowest since 1991, according to Thomson Reuters trade flows data.

“Oil sanctions are not taken lightly,” the official said. “This would be a fairly strong escalation for U.S. policy, whether it’s a complete oil sanction or salami slices of different graduated steps.”

The administration of President Donald Trump is also weighing possible sanctions against additional senior military and political figures, including Socialist Party No. 2 Diosdado Cabello, the official said.

Experts say individual sanctions have had little or no impact on the Venezuelan government’s policies. Maduro, himself sanctioned last year, regularly laughs off Washington’s disapproval and blames the U.S. “empire” for Venezuela’s economic woes.

Venezuela’s Information Ministry did not respond to a request for comment on potential further sanctions.

Washington’s crafting of new sanctions comes as Venezuela’s opposition coalition is boycotting the April 22 election, citing “fraudulent” conditions including a ban on its top two candidates from running.

Even if Venezuelan authorities delay the election by a month or two, the official said, that likely would not prompt the U.S. administration to hold back on sanctions.

ECONOMIC PAIN

The best tool for making the Venezuelan government feel economic pain, U.S. government sources say, is through “sectoral” sanctions, such as financial measures announced in August that barred U.S. banks from any new debt deals with Venezuelan authorities or state-run oil giant PDVSA.

Venezuela’s foreign minister, Jorge Arreaza, said in Geneva on Tuesday that U.S. sanctions are making foreign debt renegotiation more difficult and causing “panic” at global banks.

New sanctions under consideration, according to the administration official, would be intended to “to make the world a little smaller for these corrupt officials.”

Among the possible new U.S. targets is Camimpeg, Venezuela’s military-run oil services firm, the official said. With Maduro’s approval, Venezuela’s powerful military in 2016 founded Camimpeg, which is geared to providing PDVSA with assistance in drilling, logistics and security.

Little is known about Camimpeg’s activities. The opposition says the armed forces are a nest of corruption and the unpopular Maduro has sought to buy the support of military chiefs by giving them increasing control of the OPEC nation’s crude reserves, the world’s largest.

Another option would be sanctions aimed at putting restrictions on insurance coverage for oil tankers and oil cargos involving PDVSA, the official said.

Oil exports are typically protected by insurance on tankers as well as on the actual cargo. Without insurance, a vessel cannot navigate in international waters, which means Venezuela’s oil exports would likely be curtailed. Sanctions on cargo insurance would also hurt because PDVSA has a limited tanker fleet.

In addition, the Trump administration is continuing to consider blocking the sale of lighter U.S. crude and refined products that Venezuela mixes with its heavy crude and then exports, the official told Reuters.

”There’s a host of additional sanctions that could be imposed. The president has all those before him,” said U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, who has played a key role in pushing for Trump’s more assertive approach to Venezuela than his predecessor, Barack Obama.

“The goal here is to continue to pressure an illegitimate regime so that they would leave power or be removed from power,” Rubio told Reuters in an interview on Wednesday.

Reporting by Matt Spetalnick and Alexandra Ulmer; Additional reporting by Patricia Zengerle in Washington and Marianna Parraga in Houston; Editing by Leslie Adler

Venezuelans are starving amid economic crisis, food shortages

February 22, 2018

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, people standing

Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro, right, and his wife Cilia Flores

Reuters

February 22, 2018 | 1:49am

CARACAS – Venezuelans reported losing on average 24 lbs in body weight last year and almost 90 percent now live in poverty, according to a new university study on the impact of a devastating economic crisis and food shortages.

The annual survey, published on Wednesday by three universities, is one of the most closely-followed assessments of Venezuelans’ well being amid a government information vacuum and shows a steady rise in poverty and hunger in recent years.

Over 60 percent of Venezuelans surveyed said that during the previous three months they had woken up hungry because they did not have enough money to buy food. About a quarter of the population was eating two or less meals a day, the study showed.

Last year, the three universities found that Venezuelans said they had lost an average of 8 kilograms during 2016. This time, the study’s dozen investigators surveyed 6,168 Venezuelans between the ages of 20 and 65 across the country of 30 million people.

After winning the presidency in 1999, leftist President Hugo Chavez was proud of improving Venezuela’s social indicators due to oil-fueled welfare policies. But his successor President Nicolas Maduro’s rule since 2013 has coincided with a deep recession, due to failed state-led economic policies and the plunge in global oil prices.

Wednesday’s study flagged Venezuelans’ deteriorating diets, which are deficient in vitamins and protein, as currency controls restrict food imports, hyperinflation eats into salaries, and people line up for hours to buy basics like flour.

Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

“Income is being pulverized,” Maria Ponce, one of the study’s investigators, told a news conference at the Andres Bello Catholic University on Caracas’s outskirts.

“This disparity between the rise in prices and the population’s salaries is so generalized that there is practically not a single Venezuelan who is not poor,” she said.

The study calculated the poverty rate from 13 different indicators such as income and access to services. If the average of these indicators was above 25 percent, investigators defined a person as poor.

Prices in Venezuela rose 4,068 percent in the 12 months to the end of January, according to estimates by the country’s opposition-led National Assembly, broadly in line with independent economists’ figures.

The study showed that 87 percent of people in Venezuela, one of Latin America’s wealthiest nations back in the 1970s, were living in poverty last year, rising from 82 percent in 2016 and 48 percent in 2014.

The Venezuelan government has not released data on poverty since the first half of 2015 when the national statistics institute reported a poverty rate of 33 percent.

The government did not respond to a request for comments on the study, but its supporters often accuse academics of exaggerating data and being in league with the opposition.

Maduro blames the country’s problems on an economic war waged by the opposition and business leaders, with help from Washington.

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As Gaza and Palestinians approaches ‘famine,’ Israel, rather than world, appears most concerned

January 26, 2018

Opinion
The Times of Israel

January 26, 2018

Following US aid cuts from UNRWA, Palestinian residents hold near-daily protests and coastal enclave appears on brink of economic collapse

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A Palestinian man loads a horse-pulled cart with food aid outside the United Nations food distribution center in Gaza City on January 15, 2018. (AFP Photo/Mohammed Abed)

A Palestinian man loads a horse-pulled cart with food aid outside the United Nations food distribution center in Gaza City on January 15, 2018. (AFP Photo/Mohammed Abed)

Residents of the Gaza Strip are growing increasingly desperate over food shortages, with some saying it’s only a matter of time before Palestinians march on the Erez crossing that straddles the border with Israel “just out of distress.”

“Gaza is heading towards famine,” a longtime friend of this reporter said. “It is only a question of time, and we will get there.”

He added, “There are already cases of families who simply don’t have anything to eat, and the UNRWA budget cuts will only make things worse” — a reference to recent US cuts to the UN Palestinian aid agency.

Recently, nearly every day has seen semi-spontaneous protests, mostly by civilians, who have no livelihood and are seeking to raise international awareness of their plight.

This week, a news agency broadcast an interview with a Khan Younis resident who was offering to sell his son, held in his arms.

“Every day his mother tells me to get him something to eat,” the man said, “and I have nothing to give him.” Behind him were dozens of residents protesting the economic situation in Gaza.

Monday and Tuesday saw general trade strikes in the Strip, perhaps born of a hope, or fantasy, that such a step would serve as a wake-up call to the world, Israel, Egypt or the Palestinian Authority.

But the world is far from being concerned with Gaza at the moment. The Strip is on the brink of economic collapse, but very few are taking an interest.

Hamas security forces stand guard at the Erez border crossing into Israel, in Beit Hanun, in the northern Gaza Strip on March 26, 2017. (AFP/Mahmud Hams)

Although Gazans tend to blame Israel for their situation, it is actually the Jewish state that seems to be trying to encourage improved economic conditions.

The Palestinian Authority recently decided to renew the electricity supply to Gaza by resuming payments for power generated by Israel (now providing power to homes for six hours, followed by 12 hours of darkness).

But the decision to renew the power supply was not due to a sudden stroke of generosity by the PA. According to sources, it was the result of an ultimatum by Israel: The Jewish state warned the PA that if it didn’t renew payments for the Gaza power bill, the Israeli government would cover the costs with PA tax money it collects. Ramallah understood the message and made a public show of renewing electricity payments.

At any rate, the two additional hours of power will not do much to change the economic situation in the Strip.

It was also Israel that recently went against standard policy by approving the entry of materials into Gaza that are considered dual-purpose — that is, they could be used by Hamas to build tunnels or manufacture weaponry.

Last week, wood supplies — in the past a source of tunnel beams — were allowed in to the Strip. Before that, approval was given to supplies of cement, iron, gas, fuels, and other materials.

The general hardship, however, means these dual-purpose materials are not in very high demand. One Gaza trader said there was only a 20 percent demand for the cement that Israel allowed in.

Perhaps the most pressing problem in Gaza these days is connected to government employees, both those of Hamas and the Palestinian Authority.

Palestinian children do their homework by candlelight during a power outage in Gaza City on September 11, 2017. (AFP Photo/Mahmud Hams)

For more than two months, the 45,000 Hamas officials in Gaza have not received their wages. In Hamas’s view, the PA is supposed to pay, but the PA refuses due to the terror group’s refusal to hand over control of the territory.

On top of this are the thousands of PA officials who were forced out on pension. Possibly joining them now will be the 13,000 UNRWA officials, who can apparently expect to receive only half of their wages in the coming month as a result of US cuts.

And so economic activity in Gaza has been reduced dramatically. Unemployment figures have reached some 46.6%. Over a million people — half the population –need UNRWA food packages to survive the month.

One figure that should ring alarm bells in Israel relates to the demand for goods from the Jewish state. According to Palestinian figures, over a year ago the number of trucks carrying goods into the Gaza Strip every day was around 800-1,000, whereas now that has dropped to an average of just 370. This is not because of Israeli measures, but rather because the Gazans have no money to spend.

“There were over 100,000 police clarifications because of checks that bounced,” my friend said. “Every day workers are fired in the biggest trade companies, or they close.”

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas speaks prior to attend a EU foreign affairs council at the European Council in Brussels, January 22, 2018. (EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP)

Is there a light at the end of the tunnel? At the moment, it appears not. A reconciliation between bitter rivals Fatah and Hamas has faded (again). Hamas and the Fatah-dominated PA are still at loggerheads, separate and hostile.

Egyptian Intelligence Minister Khaled Fawzy, considered the godfather of the reconciliation process, was fired last week. The man chosen to replace him is Abbas Kamil, one of the great enemies of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.

Or, in other words, not exactly the kind of person who sees Hamas as a strategic partner.

The heir to Mahmoud Abbas

The recent crisis between the PA and the US, between US President Donald Trump and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, again highlights the question of what will be “the day after” the Palestinian leader departs the political stage.

There are more than a few sources in the Palestinian territories who claim “the day after” is already here. Senior figures in Fatah and the PLO have already opened campaigns for the succession, even though Abbas is still ruling. Meanwhile, two of the names that have been raised in recent years seem a little less relevant due to deteriorating health.

One is the secretary-general of the PLO executive committee, Saeb Erekat, who recently underwent a lung transplant in the US.

The other is the head of the Palestinian general intelligence service, Majed Faraj. According to Ramallah sources, Faraj has not been in the best of health and has needed intensive treatment. It is not clear if it was for those reasons or others that Faraj did not travel with Abbas to Brussels to meet with representatives of the European Union this week. He also skipped a summit in Cairo.  He was at the opening of a recent PLO central committee conference in Ramallah but didn’t attend the second day of meetings.

Mahmoud al-Aloul, member of the Central Committee of Fatah. January 6, 2010. (Issam Rimawi/Flash90)

So who then is in the running? Deputy Chairman of Fatah Mahmoud al-Aloul has ostensibly emerged as one of the dominant forces. (The Fatah leadership is the body that will apparently decide the heir.) He is responsible for Fatah’s Tanzim militias, appears often at Fatah events, and has cast himself as more extreme than Abbas — perhaps boosting his support among party members in the process.

He is located in Nablus and there are those who claim al-Aloul is preparing his followers for a possible physical battle over the succession.

And then there is Jibril Rajoub, who continues to intensively deal with Palestinian sport and soccer, and Tawfik Tirawi who is still depicted as the “bad boy” of the Fatah leadership.

Not to be forgotten is the man in an Israeli prison, Marwan Barghouti, convicted for his part in the murder of five Israelis in terror attacks. He was and remains the most popular figure in the territories. These days, however, Barghouti doesn’t have a real grip on the Fatah leadership, since those closest to him are being kept at a distance.

https://www.timesofisrael.com/as-gaza-approaches-famine-israel-rather-than-world-appears-most-concerned/

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Suspected cholera cases reach one million in Yemen

December 21, 2017

AFP

© AFP/File | A Yemeni child suspected of being infected with cholera cries at a hospital in the coastal city of Hodeida on November 5, 2017

SANAA (AFP) – The number of suspected cholera cases in war-torn Yemen has reached one million, the International Committee of the Red Cross said on Thursday.”Yemen suspected cholera cases has reached the threshold of one million, amplifying the suffering of the country caught up in a brutal war,” the ICRC said on its Yemen Twitter account.

The WHO warned last month that some 2,200 people have already died from the waterborne disease, which has propagated rapidly due to deteriorating hygiene and sanitation conditions.

Yemen is in the midst of a bloody war between pro-government forces and Huthi rebels who control the capital.

Saudi Arabia and its Arab allies intervened in the conflict on the side of the government in 2015 with air strikes and a far-reaching blockade on its neighbour’s air and sea ports.

In early November, the coalition tightened that blockade in response to a missile fired by the Shiite Huthis that was intercepted near Riyadh airport.

At the time, the UN aid chief warned the move would exacerbate an already dire humanitarian situation.

The blockade was partially lifted three weeks later under massive international pressure, namely over the closure of Hodeida port — key to humanitarian and commercial deliveries.

The Iran-backed Huthis on Tuesday conducted another failed missile strike against Riyadh to mark the 1,000th day since the Saudi-led intervention.

The coalition said in a statement Wednesday that it would not resort to closing Hodeida in the wake of the attack.

More than 8,750 people have been killed since Saudi Arabia and its allies joined the government’s fight against the rebels, triggering what the UN has called the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.

U.S. Urges World to Cut Ties With North Korea

November 30, 2017

Trump administration seeks to isolate Kim regime following a new missile test by Pyongyang that experts say can reach Washington D.C.

United States ambassador to the United Nations (UN) Nikki Haley speaks on the sidelines of the Security Council on November 29, 2017

United Nations—The U.S. called Wednesday on all countries to suspend diplomatic ties with North Korea and asked that China stop crude oil trade with Pyongyang as diplomats met at an emergency United Nations Security Council meeting.

The council convened for the 13th time this year to debate how the international community should confront North Korea’s rapidly accelerating ballistic missile capability.

Pyongyang on Wednesday fired an intercontinental ballistic missile into the Sea of Japan, displaying range that experts said could reach Washington, D.C., placing the entire continental U.S. under potential military and nuclear threat.

The test marked North Korea’s third ICBM and 20th ballistic missile launch in 2017, U.N. officials said.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley said the regime’s action “brings the world closer to war, not further from it.” She said that Washington didn’t seek war, but added: “If war comes, make no mistake, the North Korean regime will be utterly destroyed.”

Diplomats debated for close to two hours over tools for exerting further political and economic pressure against the regime of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Ms. Haley said the council had options: to revoke North Korea’s U.N. privileges and voting rights; call on all member states to suspend diplomatic, scholarly and trade relations; demand countries expel North Korean workers and sanction the country’s crude oil imports.

Twenty countries have already cut diplomatic ties with North Korea, Ms. Haley said. But many others, including some U.S. allies like the U.K., still have embassies and diplomats in the country.

No action was taken Wednesday, but Washington’s list of demands could be a hard sell to the council and many member states.

China and Russia are opposed to measures such as blocking oil trade because of the potential impact on North Korea’s economy and consumers, particularly in winter months.

On Wednesday, China and Russia both called for restraint in rhetoric and condemned Pyongyang’s missile launch. Both ambassadors said the only solution to the conflict was political but also expressed concern that hopes for a diplomatic solution were diminishing.

“Prospects for normalizing the situation on Korean Peninsula continue to be very distant,” said Russia’s Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia.

Some diplomats, including U.N. Undersecretary for Political Affairs Jeffrey Feltman, told the council that civilians were suffering from food insecurity and that sanctions had impeded the ability of aid agencies to conduct humanitarian relief work in North Korea.

Some diplomats, including several Security Council members, have said their capitals still see value in maintaining diplomatic relations and having a presence on the ground in Pyongyang. They said they believe a total diplomatic blackout would diminish the prospects for a resolution to the crisis.

Expelling North Korea from the U.N. or revoking its privileges also wouldn’t be an easy feat. Membership to the U.N. is decided by a vote in the General Assembly at the recommendation of the Security Council. An expulsion of a country also would need a majority vote of the 193-member assembly, and has no precedent.

Diplomats said discussions would continue on the council’s next steps and actions and it remained unclear whether or not a new sanctions resolution would materialize.

Italy’s Ambassador Sebastiano Cardi, the rotating president of the council this month and the chair of the North Korea sanctions committee, briefed the council on status of implementation of current sanctions. Mr.Cardi said that more member states reported implementing the latest resolution than previous times.

Write to Farnaz Fassihi at farnaz.fassihi@wsj.com

https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-urges-world-to-cut-ties-with-north-korea-1512010772

Venezuelan business group urges government to abort congress vote

July 25, 2017

Reuters
July 25, 2017

Image result for Nicolas Maduro, photos

CARACAS (Reuters) – Venezuela’s main business guild Fedecamaras demanded on Tuesday that President Nicolas Maduro’s government abort a controversial vote scheduled for Sunday to create a special congress capable of rewriting the country’s constitution.

Critics have called it a dictatorial move and U.S. President Donald Trump threatened last week to impose economic sanctions on Venezuela if it went ahead.

Fedecamaras said the Constituent Assembly was “unconstitutional and unnecessary” and not the way out of Venezuela’s crisis.

“We demand the executive branch abandon its intention to impose a new constitution,” the group said in a statement.

Maduro has vowed the vote will go ahead on Sunday and slammed critics, who he says do not have the country’s interests at heart.

Venezuela is undergoing a major political and economic crisis, with millions suffering food shortages and months of anti-government unrest in which more than 100 people have been killed.

Reporting by Girish Gupta; Writing by Andrew Cawthorne; Editing by Paul Simao

Venezuela grocery store shelvesPeople line up to buy food and other staple goods inside a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

16 killed in double suicide attack in NE Nigeria

June 19, 2017

AFP

© AFP | A white sheet covers the bodies of some of the victims of the double suicide bombing in Dalori Kofa village in northeast Nigeria

MAIDUGURI (NIGERIA) (AFP) – At least 16 people died in a double suicide bombing near a large camp for people made homeless by years of Boko Haram violence, Nigeria’s emergency services and locals said Monday.It was the biggest in a series of weekend attacks.

The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) said the attack took place at about 8:45 pm (1945 GMT) on Sunday close to the Dalori camp in Kofa village, near the Borno state capital Maiduguri.

Regional NEMA spokesman Abdulkadir Ibrahim said a first attack by two female suicide bombers had been thwarted by security personnel who stopped them getting into the camp.

“Two other female suicide bombers also detonated their explosives at the adjoining Dalori Kofa village, where they killed 16 people,” he said in a statement.

Earlier tolls given by local people said at least 12 or 13 people had been killed but Abdulkadir said three of the injured had since died of their wounds.

“The 16 does not include the bombers,” he told AFP.

Dalori is about 10 kilometres (six miles) southeast of Maiduguri and is one of the largest camps for internally displaced people (IDP) in the remote region.

There are nearly 50,000 people in the two Dalori camps, with Dalori 1 housing some 35,000 and Dalori 2, which was targeted in the bombings, sheltering around 10,000.

Boko Haram has previously tried to target the camp: at least 85 people were killed in January last year when insurgents rampaged through communities near Dalori.

– A bloody weekend –

The latest attack is the most deadly in Nigeria since June 8, when 11 people were killed in a rare combined gun and suicide attack in the Jiddari Polo area of Maiduguri.

Also at the weekend, Boko Haram attacked Gumsuri village, 20 kilometres from Chibok, killing five people late on Saturday, locals said.

But they were fought off by local vigilantes who engaged them in a gunbattle.

“The vigilantes got the upper hand. They killed 12 attackers and apprehended six others,” said Bitrus Haruna, a vigilante from Chibok, whose account was corroborated by a community leader from the town.

“The Boko Haram gunmen were not lucky. They were confronted by the gallant vigilantes who killed 12 of the attackers and arrested six of them.”

Then on Sunday, Boko Haram jihadists killed three soldiers in an ambush near Wajirko village, 150 kilometres (90 miles) from Maiduguri, a local vigilante said.

Last weekend, gunmen killed eight members of a civilian militia force assisting the military in the Konduga area not far from the Dalori camp.

The spate of bombings underlines the threat still posed by the jihadists, despite official claims they are a spent force.

Since the start of Boko Harm’s uprising in 2009, at least 20,000 people have been killed since and more than 2.6 million made homeless, many of whom are facing severe food shortages or starvation.

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As Gulf Crisis Bites, Qatari Food Factories Seek to Fill Gap

June 11, 2017

DOHA — At a meat processing plant in Doha’s sprawling industrial zone, masked workers toil through the night heaving boxes of raw chicken across a pristine factory floor.

They have been working extra shifts since Monday when Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other nations cut ties and severed all transport links with Qatar, prompting fears of food shortages in the import-dependent country.

The Saudi-led push to isolate Qatar by cutting diplomatic and trade ties over its alleged support for terrorism has choked food imports from key transit points in Saudi and the UAE and caused panic buying at shops early in the week.

The spat has forced the tiny, gas-rich state to turn to other foreign exporters including Turkey and Iran but also to its own local food companies to keep supermarket shelves stacked.

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Qatar — worker works in a meat processing plant in Doha, Qatar, June 10, 2017. REUTERS – Naseem Zeitoon

In the meat plant on Saturday, workers hurried about feeding frozen chicken breasts imported from Brazil through shiny metal grinders and pushing them in trolleys into an adjacent room to be packaged.

“We’ve put two shifts instead of one and stopped exporting to concentrate production for the local market … There are plans to treble production,” said Ahmed al-Khalaf, chairman of International Projects Development Co., the parent company of Qatar Meat, in his office adjoining the plant.

Qatar Meat has been working to double its output of chicken, beef and lamb to 40 tonnes per day.

Khalaf says this is proof Qatar can survive without having to rely on neighbors who have shunned it.

STILL DEPENDENT?

Khalaf’s food businesses, which include the meat plant run by one of his sons and a farm that grows root vegetables, both felt the pinch when the UAE and Saudi shut their borders.

Up to 30 shipping containers of Khalaf’s remain stranded at the Jebel Ali port in Dubai, a major business and transit hub for the region.

But by flying in goods directly from countries such as Turkey and using other ports in the Gulf including Salalah in Oman, the factory can cover its demand for raw material.

“Some equipment is coming by aeroplane from abroad to double the capacity of the production line,” Khalaf said.

Qatar, a small desert country, relies heavily on imports to feed its 2.7 million mostly foreign population and nearly half of Qatar’s food comes across the border from Saudi Arabia.

Like many local businesses, Qatar Meat imports all the meat that it processes and packages.

“The raw material – we bring it from outside,” Khalaf said.

‘WE CAN SUPPLY QATAR’

Other Qatari companies are also sensing opportunity.

In his dairy factory, Mohammed al-Kuwari, 30, is working weekends during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan to oversee production.

    “The situation is great! As you can see, there’s lots of production and we have a big share in the market,” he said as employees packaged yoghurts with the Rawa brand of his Gulf Food Production company.

The factory is producing 20,000 liters of dairy products per day, up from 15,000 liters, he said.

Gulf Food Production also relies heavily on import, including milk from France.

“It normally comes in by ship but soon maybe it will all come in by air for the same price,” thanks to government support, he said.

As for relations with Gulf neighbors, Khalaf says he is already looking elsewhere.

“I’m leaving next week to make some other arrangements to bring from other countries” including Turkey, Azerbaijan and Ukraine, he said.

(Editing by Keith Weir)