Posts Tagged ‘Jerusalem’

Israel, Jordan Ties Seen as Strategic, if Occasionally Rocky

July 24, 2017

JERUSALEM — A diplomatic standoff between Israel and Jordan over a deadly shooting at Israel’s embassy in the kingdom once again tests the strategic, if turbulent ties forged in a 1994 peace treaty.

In the past, Israel was willing to pay a high price to protect the relationship, including releasing an Islamic militant leader from prison in a deal with Jordan.

Jordan and Israel share a long border, various water and natural gas projects, and cooperate to stem Iran’s growing influence and the spread of Islamic State militancy in the region.

But the peace agreement remains deeply unpopular in the kingdom, where many citizens are of Palestinian origin and say normalization can only come after Israel reaches peace with the Palestinians.

Here’s a look at the Israeli-Jordanian relationship.

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ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION

Perhaps the most serious crisis came in 1997, during Benjamin Netanyahu’s first term as Israeli prime minister. At the time, agents of Israel’s Mossad spy agency tried to assassinate then-Hamas chief Khaled Mashaal in Amman. Two agents entered Jordan using fake Canadian passports and poisoned Mashaal as he was leaving the Hamas offices in the Jordanian capital by placing a device near his ear. They were captured shortly after the attack. Outraged by the violation of his sovereignty, Jordan’s then-King Hussein threatened to void the still-fresh peace accord if Mashaal were to die. Israel ultimately dispatched an antidote that saved his life and the Israeli agents were returned home. Under pressure, Israel agreed to release the spiritual leader of Hamas, Ahmed Yassin, from prison.

JORDAN VALLEY SHOOTING

Earlier in 1997, a Jordanian soldier opened fire at a group of Israeli schoolgirls on a field trip to a joint Israeli-Jordanian tourist resort along the border. A few days after the shooting, King Hussein traveled to Israel to comfort the families of the seven slain girls, in what was seen at the time as a touching gesture to Israel that helped solidify his image as a man of peace. The soldier was released from prison earlier this year, after serving 20 years.

CONTESTED HOLY SITE

A major holy site in Jerusalem, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as the Temple Mount, has been a frequent source of friction.

Jordan serves as Muslim custodian of the 37-acre walled compound, the third holiest site of Islam. Jews revere the esplanade as the site of their destroyed biblical Temples, and the holiest site in their religion.

Jordan’s ruling Hashemite dynasty, said to trace its ancestry back to Prophet Muhammad, draws much of its legitimacy from the role of protector of the site, which houses the Dome of the Rock and Al Aqsa mosques.

King Abdullah II has frequently protested Israeli measures, including restrictions on the access of Muslim worshippers and police raids of the compound to disperse Palestinian stone-throwers. Israel has defended its policies as needed security precautions.

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King Abdullah II with Rex Tillerson

In 2014, Jordan temporarily recalled its ambassador amid Jewish-Muslim tensions over prayer rights at the site. In a sign of the importance Israel places on its ties with Jordan, the Israeli government moved quickly to restore calm.

The following year clashes between Palestinians and Israeli security forces around the site quickly led to unrest elsewhere in Jerusalem, across Israel and in the West Bank that have continued intermittently till now.

Over the past week, Jordan was heavily involved in trying to defuse an escalating crisis between Israel and the Muslim world over metal detectors installed at the shrine. Israel set up the security measures in response to a shooting attack from there earlier this month that killed two Israeli policemen.

ISRAELI EMBASSY SHOOTING

On Sunday, an Israeli security guard at the Israeli Embassy in Jordan opened fire and killed two Jordanians, after one of them attacked him with a screwdriver. The Israeli guard was lightly wounded. The incident led to a diplomatic standoff, with Jordan saying it would not let the guard leave without an investigation. A day later, embassy staff remained in the compound, as Netanyahu tried to defuse the crisis and get the guard back to Israel. The incident came at the worst possible time for Israel, complicating efforts to find a way out of the standoff over the metal detectors at the Jerusalem site.

SECURITY TIES

Israel and Jordan share intelligence and have overlapping interests in southern Syria and elsewhere. Israel also considers Jordan an important land barrier on its eastern flank. The stability of the U.S.-allied kingdom is seen in Israel as a major security interest.

Previous crises have shown that both sides are willing to make gestures to maintain the relations.

“The incident in Jordan has a potential of disrupting the relations between the two countries,” said Oded Eran, a former Israeli ambassador to Jordan.

“However, the two countries have an interest to let this incident be solved in a very amicable way, providing that the two states can keep the perception of guarding their national interest,” he said.

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Turkey Says Israel Violating Human Rights By Installing Metal Detectors At Mosque After Two Policemen Gunned Down

July 24, 2017

July 24, 2017, at 11:06 a.m.

Turkey Says Israel Violating Human Rights at Al-Aqsa Mosque
Reuters

Palestinians shout slogans during a protest over Israel’s new security measures at the compound housing al-Aqsa mosque, known to Muslims as Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City July 20, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun REUTERS

ANKARA (Reuters) – Turkey said on Monday that Israel was violating human rights at al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem and called on global powers to take a unified stance in response.

Deputy Prime Minister and government spokesman Bekir Bozdag said after a cabinet meeting that Israeli actions at the mosque were unacceptable.

Israel said on Sunday it would not remove metal detectors whose installation outside al-Aqsa has triggered the bloodiest clashes with the Palestinians in years. However it said it could eventually reduce their use.

(Writing by Ece Toksabay; Editing by Dominic Evans)

Copyright 2017 Thomson Reuters.

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Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers at Temple Mount.

Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers and newly installed metal detectors at an entrance to the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City July 16, 2017. (photo credit:REUTERS)

Inspecting a body on Friday near what Jews call the Temple Mount, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. The area, home to the complex of Al Aqsa Mosque, is Jerusalem’s holiest site for both faiths. This photo from just after the killing of Israelis on July 14, 2017. Credit Ammar Awad/Reuters

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The Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem.(Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Trump’s Mideast Envoy Expected in Israel Amid “Worst Unrest in Years”

July 24, 2017

JERUSALEM — The Latest on the escalation in Israel and the Palestinian territories over a contested Jerusalem holy site (all times local):

9:20 a.m.

Israeli media are reporting that President Donald Trump’s Mideast envoy is on his way to the region to try and defuse a growing crisis over a sensitive Jerusalem holy site.

The newspaper Haaretz says that Jason Greenblatt is expected to arrive on Monday in the Trump administration’s first direct foray into the crisis.

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Jason Greenblatt, assistant to President Donald Trump and special representative for international negotiations, meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Ramallah on March 14. | AFP/Getty

Tensions have been high since Israel set up new measures after Arab gunmen earlier this month opened fire from the shrine, killing two Israeli policemen.

Israel says the measures are meant to prevent more attacks but Palestinians allege they are an Israeli attempt to control the Muslim-administrated site and have launched mass protests.

Three Palestinians have been killed in street clashes and a 20-year-old Palestinian stabbed and killed three members of an Israeli family in their home in a West Bank settlement.

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8:45 a.m.

Israel’s security Cabinet has reached no decision about the new security measures at a Jerusalem holy site that have set off a wave of violence.

The top decision-making forum met overnight and into early Monday to discuss the latest developments, including an incident in which a security guard at the country’s embassy in Jordan opened fire, killing two Jordanians, after being attacked.

The incident is threatening to complicate the crisis over the holy site, which is administered by Muslim authorities under the auspices of Jordan.

Israel set up the new measures after Arab gunmen opened fire from the shrine, killing two Israeli policemen. It says they are meant to prevent more attacks. Palestinians allege they are an Israeli attempt to control the site and have launched mass protests.

Related:

 (Includes links to related articles since the start of the crisis)

Israel: No decision about Jerusalem holy site — U.N. to Meet

July 24, 2017

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JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel’s security Cabinet has reached no decision about the new security measures at a Jerusalem holy site that have set off a wave of violence.

The top decision-making forum met overnight and into early Monday to discuss the latest developments, including an incident in which a security guard at the country’s embassy in Jordan opened fire, killing two Jordanians, after being attacked.

The incident is threatening to complicate the crisis over the holy site, which is administered by Muslim authorities under the auspices of Jordan.

Israel set up the new measures after Arab gunmen opened fire from the shrine, killing two Israeli policemen. It says they are meant to prevent more attacks. Palestinians allege they are an Israeli attempt to control the site and have launched mass protests.

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Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers at Temple Mount.

Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers and newly installed metal detectors at an entrance to the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City July 16, 2017. (photo credit:REUTERS)

Inspecting a body on Friday near what Jews call the Temple Mount, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. The area, home to the complex of Al Aqsa Mosque, is Jerusalem’s holiest site for both faiths. This photo from just after the killing of Israelis on July 14, 2017. Credit Ammar Awad/Reuters

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The Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem.(Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Jordanian killed and Israeli wounded at Amman embassy ‘incident’

July 23, 2017

AFP

© AFP/File | “A Jordanian man was killed and an Israeli man wounded and is in a serious condition following an incident inside the (Israeli) embassy” in the residential Rabiyeh neighbourhood of Amman

AMMAN (AFP) – A Jordanian was killed on Sunday and an Israeli seriously wounded at the Jewish state’s embassy in Amman, a security source said.”A Jordanian man was killed and an Israeli man wounded and is in a serious condition following an incident inside the (Israeli) embassy” in the residential Rabiyeh neighbourhood of Amman, said the source who declined to be named or give further details.

Jordanian security forces deployed in the streets around the embassy, an AFP correspondent said.

Israel and Jordan are bound by a 1994 peace treaty, but tensions have been high in recent days after Israel security measures at a highly sensitive holy site in annexed east Jerusalem.

On Friday, thousands of Jordanians took to the streets of Amman after the weekly prayer to denounce the Israeli measures at the Haram al-Sharif mosque compound, known to Jews as Temple Mount.

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Jordan is the official custodian of Muslim holy sites in Jerusalem.

A crowd estimated at more than 8,000 turned out for a demonstration called by Islamist movements and leftist parties.

Israel shut off the mosque compound on July 14 after Arab Israelis attacked and killed two police officers nearby.

Violence flared between Israeli security forces and Palestinians who are demanding that Israel remove metal detectors installed outside the site after the attack.

Israel Cracks Down on Hamas in West Bank after israeli Family Stabbed to Death

July 23, 2017
BY ANNA AHRONHEIM
 JULY 23, 2017 16:27

Security forces arrest 25 Palestinians in sweeps amid high tensions in Jerusalem, West Bank.

IDF forces in action following deadly attack in Halamish, July 22, 2017.

IDF forces in action following deadly attack in Halamish, July 22, 2017. (photo credit:IDF SPOKESPERSON’S UNIT)

With tensions still high in Jerusalem and the West Bank, Israeli security forces are cracking down on Hamas militants, arresting 25 Palestinians overnight across the West Bank.

On Sunday morning, the Shin Bet (Israel Security Agency) announced that it made 25 arrests of Hamas members, including several higher-up officials overnight in the West Bank in cooperation with the IDF as part of an ongoing effort to ensure that tensions do not escalate into more violence.

“The wave of detentions, that included a number of senior Hamas figures, was part of the preventive efforts of the Shin Bet security service and the Israel Defense Forces against the terrorist organizations, particularly during the past week and due to the tension surrounding the Temple Mount and the unrest in the area,” the Shin Bet said in a statement.

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Israel Defense Forces Spokesman Brigadier General Ronen Manelis

On Saturday, IDF Spokesman Brigadier General Ronen Manelis said that the IDF and other security agencies are working to prevent further deterioration of the situation on the ground which is seeing a worsening trend of increased support for attacks among Palestinians.

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Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers at Temple Mount.

Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers and newly installed metal detectors at an entrance to the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City July 16, 2017. (photo credit:REUTERS)

Inspecting a body on Friday near what Jews call the Temple Mount, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. The area, home to the complex of Al Aqsa Mosque, is Jerusalem’s holiest site for both faiths. This photo from just after the killing of Israelis on July 14, 2017. Credit Ammar Awad/Reuters

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The Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem.(Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Arab League Tells Israel it is “Playing With Fire” — Israel Not Allowed “Judaization” of Jerusalem — Jerusalem is a “red line” — Jewish symbols have no basis in reality

July 23, 2017

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BY YASSER OKBI/ MAARIV HASHAVUA
 JULY 23, 2017 13:21

 

The organization denounced Israel’s “Judaization” of the city.

THE TEMPLE MOUNT in Jerusalem, the site of a deadly attack last week.

THE TEMPLE MOUNT in Jerusalem, the site of a deadly attack last week. (photo credit:REUTERS)

The Arab League on Sunday stated that Jerusalem is a “red line” in response to massive protests against Israel’s implementation of metal detectors at the Temple Mount.

The 22-member state organization’s Secretary General, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, said that “Jerusalem is a red line, Arabs and Muslims will not allow harm to it.” He added, “Israel is playing with fire when it tries to changing the status quo in the Holy City, especially the al-Aksa mosque.”

Aboul Gheit, who previously served as Egypt’s foreign minister and visited the Temple Mount during his tenure, said that “the Israeli authorities put the region in a very dangerous situation,” saying that Israeli policies “are not directed at the Palestinians alone” and that they “hurt the feelings of every Arab and Muslim in the world.”

A spokesman for the secretary general accused Israel of trying to “Judaize” Jerusalem, a city which they said had an “Arab character.” The statement also said Israeli “excavations around the Temple Mount to look for Jewish symbols have no basis in reality.”

Aboul Gheit claimed that “Israel is trying to take over the Old City although no other country recognizes its sovereignty there, and it is considered one the most final status issues between Israel and the Palestinians.” He stressed that any changes in the Old City “constitute a red line” and encouraged the international community – particularly the United States – “to take responsibility and to oblige the Israeli government to maintain the status quo.”

He also added that “Israel is playing with fire and has ignited a major crisis in the Arab world, making the struggle with the Palestinians a religious struggle – which will lead to disastrous consequences for the future.”

Arab League spokesman Mahmoud Afifi said that an emergency meeting will be held on Wednesday with the foreign ministers of the league’s member states, at the request of Jordan.

On Monday, the UN Security Council will discuss the situation in Jerusalem.

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Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers at Temple Mount.

Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers and newly installed metal detectors at an entrance to the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City July 16, 2017. (photo credit:REUTERS)

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Inspecting a body on Friday near what Jews call the Temple Mount, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. The area, home to the complex of Al Aqsa Mosque, is Jerusalem’s holiest site for both faiths. This photo from just after the killing of Israelis on July 14, 2017. Credit Ammar Awad/Reuters

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The Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem.(Hadas Parush/Flash90)

UN Security Council will hold closed-door talks on Monday about deadly Israeli-Palestinian unrest

July 22, 2017

AFP

© AFP | Palestinian Muslim worshippers pray outside Lions’ Gate, a main entrance to the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem’s Old City, on July 22, 2017, in protest against new Israeli security measures implemented at the holy site

UNITED NATIONS (UNITED STATES) (AFP) – The UN Security Council will hold closed-door talks on Monday about deadly Israeli-Palestinian unrest over new security measures at a highly sensitive Jerusalem holy site, diplomats said.The meeting — requested by Sweden, France and Egypt — would be to “urgently discuss how calls for de-escalation in Jerusalem can be supported,” said Sweden’s political affairs coordinator Carl Skau.

Tensions have risen throughout the past week because of new Israeli security measures at the Haram al-Sharif compound, known to Jews as the Temple Mount.

The site in Jerusalem’s Old City that includes the revered Al-Aqsa mosque and Dome of the Rock has been a focal point for Palestinians.

Friday’s violence — a stabbing attack that killed three Israelis and clashes which left three Palestinians dead — was among the most severe in recent years.

On Saturday, a 17-year-old Palestinian died of injuries suffered in clashes with Israeli forces in the West Bank, the Palestinian health ministry said.

Protests Across Muslim World Condemn Israel for Metal Detectors at Al-Aksa Mosque

July 22, 2017
BY BEN LYNFIELD
 JULY 21, 2017 19:25
Photo by Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images

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In downtown Amman, a “crowded” protest condemned “Israeli steps against al-Aksa” and called on the Arab and Islamic worlds to unify in support of Islam’s third holiest shrine and to “condemn the targeting of Jerusalem and al-Aksa mosque” the Arabic service of Jordan’s official Petra news agency reported. It said that a coalition of nationalist and leftist parties issued a statement on the need for “unity of ranks” among Palestinians in order to “stand up to the Israeli plans.”

In Turkey, protests were held in solidarity with al-Aksa in Ankara and Istanbul. Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said after mosque prayers in Ankara that Israeli measures at al-Aksa “don’t help to solve any problem, on the contrary, they will lead to an increase of tension in the region and harm the atmosphere of tolerance between civilizations and religions.” al-Jazeeranet reported.

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The protests coincided with violence in Jerusalem, in which at least three Palestinians were killed amid high tensions over Israel’s installation of metal detectors on the Temple Mount at entrances to the mosque, the third holiest site in Islam. Israeli authorities said the detectors were needed for security after an attack last week by three Israeli Arab gunmen killed two policemen. But Palestinians have said they violate the status quo and reflected an Israeli intention to take over al-Aksa.In Kuala Lumpur, thousands of Malaysian Muslims participated Friday in a demonstration called to “save al-Aksa,” al-Jazeeranet reported.

Protesters held up Palestinian flags and chanted slogans against Israeli actions, the Qatari website reported. The protest ended at the US embassy, where representatives of the demonstrators delivered a letter of condemnation of Israel, al-Jazeeranet reported.

Malaysian deputy prime minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi participated in a second protest to support al-Aksa and condemn Israeli actions that was held in northern Malaysia, according to al-Jazeeranet.

The World Union of Muslim Ulama (religious scholars) called Thursday on Muslims all over the world to support al-Aksa and make Friday a “day of rage against the Zionist steps.”

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Dispute Over Holy Land’s Most Contested Shrine Leads To 6 Deaths So Far — Abbas announces that he is freezing ties with Israel

July 22, 2017

JERUSALEM — Three Palestinians were killed in street clashes in Jerusalem and three Israelis died in a stabbing attack at a West Bank settlement as tensions turned into violence over the Holy Land’s most contested shrine.

A Palestinian sneaked into a home in the Israeli settlement of Halamish in the West Bank after nightfall on Friday and stabbed to death three Israelis, the military said.

The attacker apparently jumped over the fence and infiltrated the family’s home, surprising them as they ate the traditional Sabbath evening meal. It said the Palestinian killed a man and two of his children, while a woman was wounded and taken to a hospital. The man’s grandchildren were present but not harmed, it said.

The army released footage showing a blood-covered kitchen floor. It said senior military officials were meeting overnight to discuss how to proceed.

A military spokesman called the Palestinian attack “a massacre.”

Israel TV’s Channel 10 said the assailant was in his late teens and had posted on Facebook that he was upset by the events at the Jerusalem shrine. Eli Bin, the head of Israel’s rescue service MDA, said an off-duty soldier next door heard screams, rushed to the home and shot the attacker through a window. Bin said the wounded attacker was taken to a hospital.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, meanwhile, announced that he is freezing ties with Israel, dealing a blow to fledgling Trump administration efforts to try to renew long-dormant peace talks.

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Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas

Abbas said contacts with Israel would be suspended on “all levels.” It was not immediately clear if this means long-standing security coordination between Israeli troops and Abbas’ forces will be halted.

At issue in the current round of violence are metal detectors Israel installed at the Jerusalem shrine this week in response to an attack by Arab gunmen there.

Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers at Temple Mount.

Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers and newly installed metal detectors at an entrance to the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City July 16, 2017. (photo credit:REUTERS)

The metal detectors are perceived by the Palestinians as an encroachment on Muslim rights and portrayed by Israel as a needed security measure following the attack that killed two Israeli policemen.

Earlier Friday, several thousand Palestinians in Jerusalem and the West Bank clashed with Israeli troops, burning tires or throwing stones and firecrackers. Troops fired live rounds, rubber bullets and tear gas. Three Palestinians were killed and several dozen hospitalized with live or rubber bullet injuries.

White clouds of tear gas rose from Jerusalem streets and West Bank flashpoints. In one neighborhood, Palestinians threw stones from behind a mattress used as a shield.

Israel also faced growing criticism from the Muslim world, and thousands staged anti-Israel protests after Friday prayers in Jordan and Yemen. Turkey and Egypt also condemned the violence.

The confrontations could escalate in coming days as both sides dig in.

Israel said the metal detectors would remain in place. Lawmaker Tzachi Hanegbi, a confidant of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, said Israel would not surrender to what he said was “violence and incitement” by those “attempting to drag us into a religious war.”

Jerusalem’s top Muslim cleric, Mohammed Hussein, said protests, including mass street prayers outside the shrine, would continue until the devices are removed. He told worshippers Friday that they should prepare for a “long test of wills” with Israel.

“We will not back off,” he said.

The shrine, revered by Muslims and Jews, sits at the emotional epicenter of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, symbolizing the rival religious and national narratives of the two sides.

Disputes over the 37-acre (15-hectare) walled hilltop platform in Jerusalem’s Old City have repeatedly triggered major confrontations in the past.

Muslim leaders have portrayed the metal detectors as part of a purported Israeli campaign to expand its control over the shrine — a claim Israel denies. Muslim clerics urged worshippers to pray in the streets near the shrine, rather than submit to the new security procedures.

The faithful complied. Thousands flocked to the Old City each day this week for street prayers, kneeling on mats spread on cobblestone and asphalt.

On Friday, the highlight of the Muslim religious week, Israeli police severely restricted Muslim access to the Old City to prevent mass protests.

Some 3,000 officers were deployed at checkpoints in and around the city, turning away Muslim men under the age of 50, including those trying to reach the city from Israel and the West Bank.

In the end, only a fraction of the typical Friday turnout of tens of thousands of worshippers reached the Old City.

After peaceful prayers, clashes erupted in several areas of Jerusalem and across the West Bank.

Palestinian health officials said three Palestinians were killed by live fire in different areas of Jerusalem.

The Red Crescent said 390 Palestinians were hurt, including close to 100 who were hospitalized for live fire or rubber bullet injuries. Israeli police said five officers were wounded.

The perceived threat to the shrine, home to the Al Aqsa and Dome of the Rock mosques, has galvanized Palestinians — especially those in east Jerusalem which was captured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war and quickly annexed.

Since 1967, Israel has increasingly cut off east Jerusalem from its West Bank hinterland, leaving the city’s Arab residents without political leadership.

Muslim clerics stepped into the void this week, taking the lead in prayer protests.

Under the post-1967 arrangements, Muslims administer the compound. Jews can visit, but not pray there. For decades, the status quo held, in part because leading rabbis, citing religious purity laws, banned Jews from entering.

In recent years, religious opinion has shifted, and growing numbers of Jews are visiting the compound. This shift has stoked Muslim fears that Israel may try to expand Jewish control there. Israel has reiterated that it has no intention to change the status quo.

Fakhri Abu Diab, a 55-year-old worshipper, said he feels Muslims must stand their ground.

“If we let them, they (Israelis) will take over the mosque completely,” he said, standing near the Old City. “If we resist them, they will stop.”

The compound is the third holiest site of Islam, after Mecca and Medina in Saudi Arabia. It is also Judaism’s holiest site, once home to biblical Temples.

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The Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem.(Hadas Parush/Flash90)

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Laub reported from the West Bank. Associated Press writer Ian Deitch in Jerusalem contributed to this report.

See also, The New York Times

Deadly Clashes Erupt in Standoff Over Mosque in Jerusalem