Posts Tagged ‘Mike Pompeo’

Saudi King Salman receives US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

October 16, 2018
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with King Salman in the Saudi capital on Tuesday. (SPA)

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo thanked Saudi King Salman for his commitment to a thorough, transparent investigation of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi disappearance.

Pompeo met with King Salman in the Saudi capital on Tuesday, before meeting with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

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The US chief diplomat was greeted at Riyadh airport by Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir and ambassador to Washington Prince Khalid bin Salman, an AFP correspondent reported.

“I hope you are comfortable here,” the king told Pompeo, according to the reporters. Pompeo responded, “Thank you for accepting my visit on behalf of President Trump.”

AFP

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Pompeo meets Saudi king over Khashoggi case, Turks to search consul’s residence

October 16, 2018


Saudi Arabia’s King Salman (R) meets with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Riyadh on Oct. 16, 2018. (Leah Millis/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met Saudi Arabia’s King Salman on Tuesday to discuss the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, as Turkish police prepared to search the Saudi consul’s residence in Istanbul in a widening probe.

Khashoggi, a U.S. resident and leading critic of the Saudi crown prince, vanished after entering the consulate on Oct. 2. Turkish officials say they believe he was murdered there and his body removed, which the Saudis strongly deny.

President Donald Trump, who dispatched Pompeo to Riyadh amid strained ties with the key ally, has speculated that “rogue killers” may be responsible after speaking with King Salman.

After talks with king, Pompeo met Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir and will have dinner with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. He may go on to Turkey.

Overnight, Turkish crime scene investigators entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, the last place Khashoggi was seen before vanishing, for the first time and searched the premises for over nine hours, Reuters witnesses said.

A Turkish foreign ministry source said the police would search the consulate again on Tuesday as well as the consul’s residence, which Turkish television has previously reported could be linked to Khashoggi’s disappearance.

The case has provoked an international outcry against the world’s top oil exporter, with media and business executives pulling out of an investment conference next week.

HSBC CEO John Flint backed out on Tuesday, as did the CEOs of Standard Chartered and Credit Suisse.

During the initial consulate search, CNN reported on Monday that Saudi Arabia was preparing to acknowledge Khashoggi’s death in a botched interrogation, after denying for two weeks any role in his disappearance.

The New York Times, citing a person familiar with the Saudi plans, reported the crown prince had approved an interrogation or abduction of Khashoggi. It said the Saudi government, which could not be reached immediately for comment on the reports, would shield the prince by blaming an intelligence official for the bungled operation.

Turkish authorities have an audio recording indicating that Khashoggi was killed in the consulate, a Turkish official and a security source have told Reuters, and have shared evidence with countries including Saudi Arabia and the United States.

Pompeo was greeted at the airport by officials including Saudi ambassador to Washington, Prince Khaled bin Salman.

CONSULATE SEARCH

Some 10 Turkish investigators left the consulate before 5 am (0200 GMT), and a Turkish prosecutor departed around 1-1/2 hours later, followed shortly after by a Saudi team, witnesses said.

Forensic vehicles took away soil samples as well as a metal door from the garden, the Reuters witness said. A police dog was part of the search team.

“The Turkish crime scene investigators carried out searches in the consulate and took the things deemed necessary,” a senior Turkish official said, after acknowledging the difficulty of collecting evidence 13 days after the alleged incident.

The U.N. human rights chief on Tuesday said immunity on diplomatic premises and officials should be lifted for the Khashoggi investigation.

Trump has threatened “severe punishment” if it turns out Khashoggi was killed in the consulate, but ruled out cancelling arms deals worth tens of billions of dollars. European allies have urged accountability for those responsible.

Many members of the U.S. Congress, which has long had a testy relationship with Saudi Arabia, have issued strong criticism of the kingdom.

Slideshow (12 Images)

Saudi Arabia has said it would retaliate against any pressure or economic sanctions “with greater action,” and Arab allies rallied to support it.

The Saudi riyal, rebounded early after falling to its lowest in two years over fears that foreign investment could shrink. Saudi stock index was down 3 percent in early Tuesday trade before it recouped some losses for a decline of 0.5 percent by 0949 GMT.

The chief executive of Clariant, which has Saudi Basic Industries Corp (SABIC) as its anchor shareholder, said rising tensions about Khashoggi could hit the Swiss specialty chemicals maker.

FAMILY STATEMENT

Khashoggi, a familiar face on Arab talk shows, moved to Washington last year fearing retribution for his criticism of Prince Mohammed, who has cracked down on dissent with arrests.

The insider never shied away from criticizing Saudi policies but gained prominence in many circles, including as an adviser to former Saudi intelligence chief Prince Turki al-Faisal.

Members of Khashoggi’s family have called for “an independent and impartial international” investigation.

Khashoggi’s fiancee Hatice Cengiz, who was waiting outside the consulate the day he disappeared, tweeted a Koranic verse warning those who kill on purpose, with the hashtag “Jamal is the Martyr of the Word”.

A pro-government Turkish daily published preliminary evidence last week from investigators who it said had identified a 15-member Saudi intelligence team that arrived in Istanbul on diplomatic passports hours before Khashoggi disappeared. One of the names matches a LinkedIn profile for a forensic expert who has worked at the Saudi Interior Ministry for 20 years.

Additional reporting by Yesim Dikmen and Sarah Dadouch in Istanbul, Orhan Coskun and Ece Toksabay in Ankara, John Revill in Basel, Oliver Hirt in Zurich, Lawrence White in London, Stephanie Nebehay in Geneva; Writing by Ece Toksabay, Daren Butler and Stephen Kalin, editing by Darren Schuettler, Sam Holmes, William Maclean

Reuters

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Pompeo arrives in Riyadh to discuss Khashoggi case with king, crown prince

October 16, 2018

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo arrived in Riyadh on Tuesday to discuss the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi with the king and crown prince, after President Donald Trump speculated “rogue killers” may be responsible.

Overnight, Turkish crime scene investigators entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, the last place Khashoggi was seen before vanishing on Oct. 2, for the first time and searched the premises for over nine hours, Reuters witnesses said.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, second right in front, walks with Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir after arriving in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Oct. 16, 2018. (Leah Millis/Pool Photo via AP)

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, second right in front, walks with Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir after arriving in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Oct. 16, 2018. (Leah Millis/Pool Photo via AP)

During the search, CNN and the New York Times reported Saudi Arabia was preparing to acknowledge Khashoggi’s death in a botched interrogation, after denying for two weeks any role in his disappearance.

Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir and ambassador to Washington, Prince Khaled bin Salman, greeted Pompeo at the airport. He will meet King Salman and Jubeir before dinner with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, according to reporters traveling with him. He may go on to Turkey.

The case has strained U.S. ties with Riyadh, carefully cultivated by the president, and provoked an international outcry against the world’s top oil exporter, with media and business executives pulling out of an investment conference next week.

Khashoggi, a U.S. resident, Washington Post columnist and leading critic of Prince Mohammed, vanished after entering the consulate to get marriage documents. Turkish officials say they believe he was murdered there and his body removed.

Citing two unidentified sources, CNN reported on Monday that Saudi Arabia was preparing a report that would acknowledge Khashoggi was killed as the result of an interrogation gone wrong. The Saudi government, which until now has maintained that Khashoggi left the consulate soon after entering, could not be reached immediately for comment on the reports.

The New York Times, citing a person familiar with the Saudi plans, reported the crown prince had approved an interrogation or abduction of Khashoggi. The Saudi government, it said, would shield the prince by blaming an intelligence official for the bungled operation.

Turkish authorities have an audio recording indicating that Khashoggi was killed in the consulate, a Turkish official and a security source have told Reuters, and have shared evidence with countries including Saudi Arabia and the United States.

The Latest: UN urges Saudi Arabia to reveal Khashoggi's fate
Cleaning personnel wait to enter Saudi Arabia’s Consulate in Istanbul, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Turkey says an “inspection” of the consulate is expected to take place later on Monday, nearly two weeks after Saudi journalist after Jamal Khashoggi disappeared there. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris) (Petros Giannakouris)

CONSULATE SEARCH

Some 10 Turkish investigators left the consulate before 5 am (0200 GMT), and a Turkish prosecutor departed around 1-1/2 hours later, followed shortly after by a Saudi team, witnesses said.

Forensic vehicles took away soil samples as well as a metal door from the garden, the Reuters witness said. A police dog was part of the search team.

“The Turkish crime scene investigators carried out searches in the consulate and took the things deemed necessary,” a senior Turkish official told Reuters, after earlier acknowledging the difficulty of collecting evidence 13 days after the alleged incident.

Trump has threatened “severe punishment” if it turns out Khashoggi was killed in the consulate, but ruled out cancelling arms deals worth tens of billions of dollars. European allies have urged accountability for those responsible.

Many members of the U.S. Congress, which has long had a testy relationship with Saudi Arabia, have issued strong criticism of the kingdom.

Saudi Arabia has said it would retaliate against any pressure or economic sanctions “with greater action,” and Arab allies rallied to support it.

Its currency, the riyal, rebounded early on Tuesday after falling to its lowest in two years over fears that foreign investment could shrink amid international pressure. The Saudi stock index was down 3 percent.

FAMILY STATEMENT

Khashoggi, a familiar face on Arab talk shows, moved to Washington last year fearing retribution for his criticism of Prince Mohammed, who has cracked down on dissent with arrests.

The consummate insider never shied away from criticizing Saudi policies but gained prominence in many circles, including as an adviser to former Saudi intelligence chief Prince Turki al-Faisal.

Members of Khashoggi’s family have called for an investigation.

“We are sadly and anxiously following the conflicting news regarding the fate of our father after losing contact with him two weeks ago,” they said on Monday.

“The strong moral and legal responsibility which our father instilled in us obliges us to call for the establishment of an independent and impartial international commission to inquire into the circumstances of his death.”

Khashoggi’s fiancee Hatice Cengiz, who was waiting outside the consulate the day he disappeared, tweeted a Koranic verse warning those who kill on purpose, with the hashtag “Jamal is the Martyr of the Word”.

A pro-government Turkish daily published preliminary evidence last week from investigators who it said had identified a 15-member Saudi intelligence team that arrived in Istanbul on diplomatic passports hours before Khashoggi disappeared.

One of the names matches a LinkedIn profile for a forensic expert who has worked at the Saudi Interior Ministry for 20 years. Other names and photos resembled officers in the Saudi military.

Additional reporting by Yesim Dikmen and Sarah Dadouch; Writing by Ece Toksabay, Daren Butler and Stephen Kalin, editing by Darren Schuettler, Sam Holmes, William Maclean

Reuters

North Korea more of the same worthless words — Slams US for ‘evil’ sanctions push

October 16, 2018

 

North Korea’s state media on Tuesday slammed the United States for an “evil” attempt to maintain sanctions against Pyongyang, accusing President Donald Trump of blocking progress in inter-Korean relations.

The declaration threatens to upset the negotiations between Washington and the nuclear-armed North, in which Trump is expected to hold a second summit soon with Pyongyang’s leader Kim Jong Un.

At their first meeting in Singapore in June they signed a vaguely-worded pledge on denuclearisation, but little progress has been made since then with the two sides sparring over the meaning of the text.

© AFP/File | Pyongyang has accused US President Donald Trump of blocking progress in inter-Korean relations

Pyongyang has not made any explicit public promise to give up its existing arsenal but has repeatedly called for UN Security Council sanctions imposed over its weapons programmes to be loosened, citing a freeze in its nuclear and missile tests.

For its part Washington has been adamant the measures should be maintained until Pyongyang’s complete denuclearisation.

Washington was playing a “double game”, said a lengthy commentary carried by the North’s official KCNA news agency, and was “little short of destroying” the rare diplomatic opportunity between the two.

“Hostile policy and reciprocity can not go together,” it said, and negotiations would not move forward “an inch with an obstacle called sanctions”.

“The US… is responding to good faith with evil,” it added.

– ‘Enraged all Koreans’ –

KCNA said the article, nearly 1,700 words long and titled “What Do Ill-boding Remarks from US Signify”, had been “made public” by Kim Chol Myong.

No further details about its origins or the author’s affiliation were given, suggesting that “Kim Chol Myong” is likely to be a pseudonym.

But the fact that it was carried by Pyongyang’s official news agency indicates that it has the authorities’ approval.

It was published just days after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo visited Pyongyang and said he had “productive” talks on denuclearisation with the North Korean leader.

After an earlier Pompeo visit in July the North issued an angrily-worded official foreign ministry statement condemning what it called his “unilateral” demands for its disarmament, describing them as “gangster-like”.

It cast doubt on the prospects for progress — even though it proclaimed “our good faith in President Trump” — and prompted the US leader to cancel a scheduled August trip to Pyongyang by his Secretary of State, before a fresh round of visits and a letter from Kim restarted the process.

But Tuesday’s declaration went further, implicitly criticising the US leader — who is known to consider personal relationships important.

Without naming Trump, it referred to his comments last week that Seoul would not lift its own sanctions against the North “without our approval”.

“Even the White House made such threatening words,” KCNA said, “enraging not only south Koreans but all other Koreans”.

South Korea’s dovish President Moon Jae-in — who has held three meetings with Kim this year — has vowed to honour the UN sanctions but agreed to pursue a handful of joint economic projects with the North.

After his visit this month Pompeo said Kim had agreed to allow international inspectors to visit a nuclear test site that the North dismantled in May but did not elaborate on any offers made by the US in return.

AFP

Saudi Arabia to acknowledge ‘murdering’ Khashoggi, planned abduction gone wrong

October 16, 2018

Saudi Arabian officials are preparing a report that will acknowledge Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s death was “the result of an interrogation that went wrong,” one that was intended to lead to his abduction from Turkey, CNN anchor Jake Tapper said late Monday.

Citing two sources speaking on the condition of anonymity to Clarissa Ward and Tim Lister, both journalists for the CNN, Tapper added that the report would “likely conclude that the operation was carried out without clearance and transparency and that those involved will be held responsible.”

Citing another source, the anchor also added that the report is “still being prepared.” Tapper also said in a tweet that the source “cautioned that things could change.”


A security officer looks out the doors of the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Monday. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Dissident journalist and Washington Post contributor Khashoggi, 58, has been missing since last Tuesday after entering the Saudi consulate to gather documents for marriage. His fiancee and friends have said he did not leave the building. The dissident Saudi journalist’s Turkish colleagues and several Turkish officials have voiced concerns that he was murdered in the consulate.

Turkish authorities repeatedly said that Khashoggi never left the consulate premises. Footage emerged Tuesday showing Khashoggi entering the building the week before.

Saudi officials and consulate workers denied murder allegations and claimed that Khashoggi left the consulate, but failed to provide any evidence of his exit from the facility.

On Saturday, U.S. President Donald Trump said Saudi Arabia could be behind the disappearance of Khashoggi and warned Washington would inflict “severe punishment” if he was murdered.

Saudi Arabia dismissed threats of sanctions the following day and vowed the oil-rich kingdom would retaliate against such action.

“The kingdom affirms its total rejection of any threats and attempts to undermine it, whether through economic sanctions, political pressure or repeating false accusations,” a statement by the Saudi government said.

CNN, Reuters, AFP, Daily Sabah

https://www.dailysabah.com/politics/2018/10/15/saudi-arabia-to-acknowledge-murdering-khashoggi-planned-abduction-gone-wrong-report

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(WSJ)

Turkish investigators search Saudi Consulate where journalist was last seen (Washington Post)

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/saudis-to-allow-turkish-investigators-to-search-consulate/2018/10/15/4f1fd074-d000-11e8-a4db-184311d27129_story.html?utm_term=.183bdb1fcbc5

Saudis Weigh Saying Journalist Was Killed by Mistake

October 16, 2018

Riyadh is considering issuing a statement saying that rogue operatives killed Khashoggi by mistake during an interrogation gone wrong

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Trump Suggests 'Rogue Killers' Could Be Behind Missing Journalist

President Trump said he talked with Saudi Arabia’s king and crown prince, who “firmly” denied any involvement in the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Photo: Getty
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Saudi Arabia, under mounting pressure, weighed a new public response to confront accusations its agents killed a dissident Saudi journalist, as President Trump dispatched his top diplomat to the kingdom and investigators searched the presumed crime scene in Istanbul for clues.

On Monday, Saudi officials were considering whether to say rogue operatives killed Jamal Khashoggi during an interrogation gone wrong, people familiar with the matter said, a move that could help the royal family distance itself from responsibility.

The case has strained U.S.-Saudi ties and cast a shadow over Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s efforts to overhaul the kingdom’s economy and attract foreign investment. Since Mr. Khashoggi’s disappearance, powerful U.S. executives have withdrawn from a high-profile investment conference in Riyadh this month.

The government’s tentative explanation comports with comments Mr. Trump made Monday, after speaking to Saudi King Salman: “It sounded to me like maybe these could have been rogue killers,” the president said.

It is unclear whether a Saudi statement would be released, and its content hasn’t been completed, the people familiar with the matter said. The Saudi government didn’t respond to a request for comment. Mr. Trump said, “so far it’s just the rumor of a report coming out.”

Turkish authorities allege that Mr. Khashoggi, a former royal insider, was killed by Saudi agents after he entered the country’s consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. The Turkish government has shared with U.S. officials what it describes as audio and video recordings purporting to show that Mr. Khashoggi was killed in the building, people familiar with the matter said.

Saudi Arabia has denied the accusation and said Mr. Khashoggi left the consulate alive, soon after arriving.

Mr. Trump said he had a 20-minute phone call early Monday with King Salman, who “firmly denied any knowledge” of what happened to the missing journalist. The president suggested Saudi agents could have been operating without the Saudi government’s knowledge. He dispatched Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to Saudi Arabia to meet the king and visit “other places if necessary,” including Turkey.

Mr. Trump’s comments, coupled with Mr. Pompeo’s trip to Saudi Arabia and a joint Saudi-Turkish investigation, were widely seen as an indication of a possible deal among U.S., Saudi Arabia and Turkey to prevent further diplomatic damage.

“It looks like some sort of middle ground agreement will be reached,” said Ali al-Ahmed, director of the Institute for Gulf Affairs, a Washington-based think tank often critical of the Saudi monarchy. “The Saudis will blame their people for taking unauthorized action and promise to put them through their justice system.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is being sent by President Trump on a visit to Saudi Arabia. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is being sent by President Trump on a visit to Saudi Arabia. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst PHOTO: JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
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Mr. Khashoggi’s disappearance has tested the Trump administration’s efforts to make the kingdom the linchpin of its Middle East policy, based in part on a shared antagonism toward Iran.

Both Saudi Arabia and Turkey have sent signals they were seeking to avoid direct confrontation over an incident that has drawn widespread international concern and congressional pressure on the White House.

Mr. Trump also said King Salman had assured him that Saudi Arabia and Turkey were “working hand in hand, very closely on getting to the bottom of what happened.”

Mr. Trump has cited denials by associates and allies, at times in the face of evidence to the contrary. He repeatedly has noted Russian President Vladimir Putin’s denials of U.S. intelligence agencies’ conclusions that Moscow interfered in the 2016 U.S. election. When Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore was accused last fall of molesting and assaulting teenage girls, Mr. Trump said of the allegation: “He totally denies it.”

The 82-year-old King Salman is the ruler of Saudi Arabia. But his son, Prince Mohammed, is effectively the country’s day-to-day leader, and has overseen a succession of recent campaigns targeting perceived dissidents at home and abroad.

Suspicion that Saudi Arabia played a role in the journalist’s disappearance has led a growing list of Western executives and advisers to announce they were pulling out of a premier three-day conference set to start in Riyadh on Oct. 23.

Among them were James Dimon, the chief executive of JPMorgan Chase & Co., a featured speaker whose bank has longstanding ties to Saudi Arabia; Laurence Fink, CEO of the world’s largest asset manager, BlackRock Inc.; and Stephen Schwarzman, CEO of private-equity giant Blackstone Group, said people familiar with the matter.

Mr. Trump said the administration had not yet made a decision on whether Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin would attend.

The Saudi embassy in Washington told invitees on Monday that it was canceling its annual “national day” commemoration, a reception held to hone relations with leaders in the U.S. capital.

The Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Monday.
The Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Monday. PHOTO: OZAN KOSE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

On Monday, one of Saudi Arabia’s biggest public relations firms, Glover Park Group, ended its $150,000 monthly contract with the government, said a person involved in the work. BGR Government Affairs, a lobbying firm, also ended its $80,000-a-month work with the embassy, an official said.

Meanwhile, King Salman ordered the Saudi public prosecutor to head a probe to determine responsibility for who was responsible for Mr. Khashoggi’s disappearance, people familiar with the matter said Monday. Probe results could be announced within days, and lead to some Saudi individuals being held accountable for Mr. Khashoggi’s death, one of the people said.

Meantime, Turkish authorities said they had reached an agreement with Saudi Arabia to search the kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul for the missing journalist. Turkish television showed a group of investigators entering the building at 7:30 p.m. local time, saying the inspection would drag out late into the night.

Turkish officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, have said police had gathered evidence that Mr. Khashoggi was killed and his body dismembered by a team of 15 operatives dispatched from Riyadh. But Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has stopped short of accusing the kingdom of his murder.

Turkish authorities suspect Prince Mohammed had a hand in Mr. Khashoggi’s disappearance because the alleged team of operatives they say killed the journalist comprised Saudi government officials and intelligence officers who flew to Istanbul on corporate jets controlled by the crown prince.

What We Know About the Missing Saudi Journalist Jamal Khashoggi

What We Know About the Missing Saudi Journalist Jamal Khashoggi

Turkish officials say a team of alleged Saudi assassins apprehended and likely killed a Saudi journalist in Istanbul. The Saudis have denied any involvement but Jamal Khashoggi has not been seen since he entered the Saudi Consulate on Oct.2. Photo: Getty Images

Saudi Arabia first pledged it would open the consulate doors to Turkish police several days after Mr. Khashoggi vanished. Since then, however, Saudi and Turkish officials argued over how thoroughly Turkish investigators would be allowed to inspect the diplomatic compound.

“We wanted to come in with all the chemicals and equipment investigators use to inspect crime scenes,” the official said. “The Saudis said we could only get a brief tour.”

The official said he expected Monday’s search would be conducted on Turkey’s terms and amount to a full inspection.

It comes a day after Mr. Erdogan spoke about Mr. Khashoggi’s disappearance with King Salman. The phone call, during which King Salman thanked the Turkish president for agreeing to set up a joint Saudi-Turkish team to investigate what happened, was the first direct contact between the two leaders since the journalist went missing.

–Margherita Stancati, Farnaz Fassihi, Courtney McBride and Julie Bykowicz contributed to this article.

Write to Summer Said at summer.said@wsj.com, Rebecca Ballhaus at Rebecca.Ballhaus@wsj.com and David Gauthier-Villars at David.Gauthier-Villars@wsj.com

Appeared in the October 16, 2018, print edition as ‘Saudis Weigh Shift In Story.’

Includes videos:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/turkey-to-inspect-saudi-consulate-where-khashoggi-went-missing-1539604362

Chinese official finds Trump ‘very confusing’; says US warships at China’s doorstep building tension

October 14, 2018

President Trump’s inner circle is “very confusing” for foreign diplomatic officials in Washington to navigate, China’s U.S. ambassador Cui Tiankai told “Fox News Sunday” in an exclusive wide-ranging interview.

Tiankai added that U.S. warships are “on the offensive” near China, days after a U.S. destroyer nearly collided with a Chinese military vessel in the South China Sea. The Pentagon said the Chinese ship came within 45 yards of the U.S. destroyer, in an intentionally “unsafe” maneuver.

Tiankai’s comments come as Chinese President Xi Jinping and Trump prepare for a possible meeting at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, next month, amid a rapidly escalating trade conflict between the two nations that some have called a new cold war.

Asked by host Chris Wallace whether Trump listens primarily to hardliners like trade director Peter Navarro — who has characterized China as the economic “parasite of the world” — or moderates like chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Tiankai responded simply, “You tell me.”

The envoy added that other ambassadors seemingly have the same issue. President Trump has repeatedly said he tries to avoid “telegraphing” his moves to foreign adversaries.

“Honestly, I’ve been talking to ambassadors of other countries in Washington, D.C., and this is also part of their problem,” Tiankai said. “They don’t know who is the final decision-maker. Of course, presumably, the president will take the final decision, but who is playing what role? Sometimes it could be very confusing.”

Trump, citing widespread intellectual property theft in China that cuts into the profits of U.S. companies doing business there, placed tariffs on approximately $200 billion of Chinese imports in September, following his imposition of significant tariffs on nearly $35 billion in Chinese goods in July. China quickly retaliated with $60 billion in tariffs of its own.

The White House has bipartisan support for hitting back at Chinese intellectual property theft. In an interview in June, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., ordinarily a fierce Trump critic, agreed with the administration’s China policy and said that the country “takes total advantage” of the U.S.

“Not only do they steal our intellectual property, they keep our good companies out, and say the only way you’re going to be able to sell your American products in China … is if you come to China, make them there, and give us the techniques and intellectual property,” Schumer said.

And the president has insisted his tariffs are already having a major impact.

“Their economy has gone down very substantially, and I have a lot more to do if I want to do it,” Trump told “Fox & Friends” last week. “They lived too well for too long and, frankly, I guess they think the Americans are stupid people. Americans are not stupid people. We were led badly when it came to trade.”

WATCH: HAS US ENTERED NEW COLD WAR WITH CHINA?

But in his interview with Fox News, Tiankai denied that China permits or engages in widespread intellectual property theft, and said even the suggestion was an affront to the country’s population.

“I think all of these accusations about how China has developed are groundless and not fair to the Chinese people,” he told Wallace. “You see, China has 1.4 billion people. It would be hard to imagine that one-fifth of the global population could develop and prosper not by relying mainly on their own efforts, but by stealing or forcing some transfer of technology from others — that’s impossible.”

“It’s important to notice who started this trade war. We never want to have a trade war.”

— China’s U.S. ambassador Cui Tiankai

He added: “It’s important to notice who started this trade war. We never want to have a trade war, but if somebody started a trade war against us, we have to respond and defend our own interests.”

Concerns have been raised that China, the largest foreign holder of U.S. Treasurys, might start dumping its holdings as a way to pressure the United States in the trade dispute. But Mnuchin said this possibility didn’t concern him because it would be contrary to Beijing’s economic interests to start dumping its Treasury holdings, and would be “very costly” to China.

Top U.S. officials have warned that the ongoing conflict with China extends beyond trade. In Senate testimony on Wednesday, FBI Director Christopher Wray said that “China, in many ways, represents the broadest, most complicated, most long-term counterintelligence threat we face.”

He added that “Russia is … fighting to stay relevant after the fall of the Soviet Union,” while “China is fighting tomorrow’s fight…and it affects every sector of our economy.”

Vice President Pence, meanwhile, has accused China of trying to interfere with U.S. elections, including by targeting tariffs toward industries that support Trump and even spreading propaganda in U.S. media outlets.

In response, Tiankai effectively called the U.S. the aggressor in several spheres of influence.

“You see, Chinese media, they are just learning from America media to use all these means, to buy commercial pages from newspapers, to make their views known or to cover what is happening here,” Tiankai said. “This is normal practice for all the media.”

WATCH: HOMELAND SECURITY SECRETARY WARNS CHINA ENGAGING IN ‘UNPRECEDENTED’ INFLUENCE CAMPAIGN AHEAD OF MIDTERMS

The envoy also said that Chinese warships, which harassed and nearly collided with a U.S. destroyer recently in the disputed South China Sea, had responded appropriately to an intervention on their “doorstep.” Beijing has built up military fortifications on two contested Chinese man-made islands there despite pledging not to do so.

“Where the incident took place, you were right to say it was in South China Sea. So it’s at China’s doorstep,” Tiankai told Wallace. “It’s not Chinese warships that are going to the coast of California, or to the Gulf of Mexico. It’s so close to the Chinese islands and it’s so close to the Chinese coast. So who is on the offensive? Who is on the defensive? This is very clear.”

Tiankai said, however, that China would continue to “faithfully” implement sanctions against its longtime ally, North Korea, in order to restore stability to the region. He  said a “coordinated, phased, and step-by-step approach” to North Korean denuclearization is the best approach, mirroring the position of that country’s leader, Kim Jong Un.

“How can you convince him to give up all the nuclear weapons without any hope that the U.S. would be following a more friendly policy towards him?” Tiankai asked.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was in Beijing last week, where top Chinese officials vowed to take “all necessary measures” to safeguard their country. They have since said that high-level communications continue between the two countries.

Still, there were signs tensions between China and the U.S. have eased somewhat in recent days. Global stock market indexes bounced back sharply Friday after their recent plunges, on word of the possible presidential meeting.

And reports have emerged that Mnuchin has advised against labeling China a currency manipulator — a status that could trigger penalties. The Chinese currency has been falling in value against the dollar in recent months, raising concerns that Beijing is devaluing its currency to make Chinese goods more competitive against U.S. products.

Mnuchin did not say this weekend what the forthcoming Treasury report, set to come out next week, will conclude about China’s currency practices. In the past, Treasury has placed China on a watch-list but found that Beijing did not meet the threshold to be labeled a currency manipulator.

The Treasury secretary met Thursday with Yi Gang, head of China’s central bank. “I expressed my concerns about the weakness of the currency.” Mnuchin said.

Tiankai told Wallace that China, despite its ongoing spat with the U.S. on a variety of fronts, remains optimistic about November’s planned meeting between Trump and Jinping. Kudlow, the chief White House economic adviser, said on “Fox News Sunday” that the one-on-one between the two leaders will “probably” happen.

“There’s a good mutual understanding and good working relationship between the two,” Tiankai said. “I hope and I’m sure this will continue.”

Fox News’ Samuel Chamberlain and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

includes videos:

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/chinese-official-finds-trump-very-confusing-says-us-warships-at-chinas-doorstep-building-tension

US to review Chinese debt before decision on Pakistan’s loan request

October 13, 2018

The United States said that it will examine closely Pakistan request for a loan from the International Monetary Fund(IMF), adding that “part of the reason that Pakistan found itself in this situation is Chinese debt”.

Asked at a Thursday news briefing how would the United States deal with Pakistan’s request, State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said: “In all cases, we examine that closely from all angles of it, including Pakistan’s debt position, in evaluating any type of loan programme”.

Image result for u.s., china, pakistan, flags, photos

Take a look: The IMF’s corrective measures will be harsh. Here’s how the government can get straight to policymaking

Ms Nauert also blamed Pakistan’s loan arrangement with China for the country’s economic woes.

“I think part of the reason that Pakistan found itself in this situation is Chinese debt and the fact that there is debt that governments have incurred that they maybe thought wouldn’t be so tough to bail themselves out of, but has become increasingly tough,” she said.

On Tuesday, IMF chief economist Maurice Obstfeld urged Pakistan to review the loans it was receiving from China and avoid “excessive debts which cannot be repaid”.

Recently, a bipartisan group of 16 US senators claimed in a joint statement that China’s Belt and Road Initiative, which also funds projects in Pakistan, was a debt-trap. The recipients often found themselves deeply in debt to China and were forced to make painful concessions, they warned.

In an interview to a US television network CNBC in July, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that the United States would not allow Pakistan to use the US taxpayers’ dollars to repay China.

“Make no mistake: We will be watching what the IMF does,” he said.

Pakistani officials reject this argument, pointing out that their indebtedness to China is much smaller than imagined.

In an official statement issued in August, Islamabad pointed out that “China stepped forward to support Pakistan’s development at a time when foreign investment had dried up and economic activity was being crippled by energy shortages and infrastructure gaps”.

The United States is the largest contributor to the IMF and has 17.68 per cent of voting rights in major decisions. China is third, behind Japan, and controls 6.49 per cent of the vote.

In response to a separate question, Ms Nauert confirmed that an ambassadorial appointment for Pakis­tan “is in the pipeline”.

Published in Dawn, October 13th, 2018

https://www.dawn.com/news/1438716/us-to-review-chinese-debt-before-decision-on-pakistans-loan-request

In full offensive on China, Trump gambles on end-game

October 13, 2018

Donald Trump has escalated his feud with China into a full-press offensive that has drawn comparisons to the Cold War. Now the question on both sides of the Pacific is, how will it end?

In recent weeks, Trump has slapped $250 billion worth of tariffs, boosted military support for rival Taiwan, accused China of interfering in US elections, stepped up denunciations of Beijing’s human rights record and curtailed its access to US nuclear technology.

The real estate mogul, who early in his tenure had described Chinese President Xi Jinping as a friend, was generally presumed to be most interested in trade as he has repeatedly vowed to ramp up US factory production by fighting back the flow of cheaper manufactured imports.

But his administration has expanded its pressure campaign to virtually all fronts, a strategy unprecedented since the time the United States and China established diplomatic relations four decades ago.

“It is a full-frontal assault by the US on China,” said Elizabeth Economy, director for Asia studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

© AFP/File | Trump, who early in his tenure had described Chinese President Xi Jinping as a friend, was generally presumed to be most interested in trade as he has repeatedly vowed to ramp up US factory production by fighting back the flow of cheaper imports

“There is a general sense in Washington that China is simply too big now, it’s simply too large as a country and as an economy, to allow it to continue to violate all sorts of expected international trade and investment norms,” she said.

Economy said that the United States was also struck at how Xi has “presented a very different China to the world” with a “much more ambitious and expansive foreign policy.”

“The US and other countries say, ‘Okay, this is the China we have to deal with, not what we anticipated ten years ago.'”

– China ready for ‘marathon’ –

Hua Po, a political commentator in Beijing, agreed that trade was only the “superficial” source of friction.

He believed that the underlying concern of the United States was the Made in China 2025 plan, under which Beijing has set a goal of rapidly ensuring that a majority of its industry is sourced domestically.

The United States accuses China of rampantly stealing technology and seeking an unfair trade advantage by forcing foreign businesses to work with local partners.

“Even if the trade issue is resolved, other problems between China and the United States will continue to exist,” Hua said.

Hua said that Trump seemed to want “to fight a new cold war.” But Hua doubted that the United States would enjoy the support of its allies, especially in Europe, which do not see China as the same type of threat as the former Soviet Union.

And amid turbulence on Wall Street, China is expecting the US economy to see growing strains as negative effects emerge from Trump’s signature domestic policy of tax cuts, Hua said.

“China does believe that this dispute will last for some time. The United States wants to run a 100-meter race with China, but China wants a marathon with the United States,” he said.

– Diplomacy through confrontation –

Tensions soared between the world’s two largest economies last month at the annual UN General Assembly session.

A closed-door meeting of foreign ministers from the five permanent members of the Security Council turned “icy” as US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo lashed out aggressively against China, whose foreign minister, Wang Yi, responded with similar intensity, according to a witness.

Vice President Mike Pence a week later delivered a speech in which he took China to task and made the headline-grabbing claim, a month ahead of congressional elections, that Beijing was intervening in US politics, citing the Asian power’s purchase of newspaper advertisements and its imposition of counter tariffs in politically crucial states.

The two countries have still kept in contact on resolving the nuclear crisis with North Korea, a top priority for both powers, with Pompeo visiting Beijing after a stop in Pyongyang.

Ryan Hass, the director for China policy on the White House’s National Security Council under Obama, said that Trump had taken a new course by emphasizing public pressure over diplomacy with China.

He said that Trump had gambled “on the assumption that Beijing needs a stable relationship with Washington” and that Beijing is ready to moderate its policies both at home and abroad.

“Beijing believes Washington is organizing itself to contest China’s rise. As such, Beijing sees little incentive to accommodate Trump’s demands on trade or other issues, because doing so would not resolve the underlying source of intensifying rivalry — Washington’s efforts to hold back China’s rise,” said Hass, now a fellow at the Brookings Institution.

“Given these dynamics, it is unlikely that either side will moderate its approach in the foreseeable future,” he said.

AFP

Related:

U.S. Edges Toward New Cold-War Era With China

October 12, 2018
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WASHINGTON—The Trump administration is moving deliberately to counter what the White House views as years of unbridled Chinese aggression, taking aim at military, political and economic targets in Beijing and signaling a new and potentially much colder era in U.S.-China relations.

In the first 18 months of the administration, ties between the world’s two biggest powers were defined by negotiations over how to restrain North Korea and ways to rebalance trade. Those high-profile endeavors masked White House preparations for a more hard-nosed stance with Beijing—a strategy now surfacing as China’s help with Pyongyang wanes and trade talks stall.

Interviews with senior White House officials and others in government make clear that recent volleys in what appears a new Cold War aren’t the exception to President Trump’s China policy. They are exactly what the administration wants—putting the spotlight on a meeting between Mr. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping at a multilateral summit planned for November.

Vice President Mike Pence last week gave a blistering speech on U.S.-China relations, saying “the United States has adopted a new approach to China” with the message to China: “This president will not back down.”

On Wednesday, the Treasury Department announced new rules targeting China that tighten national security reviews of foreign investment. On the same day, the Justice Department said it had brought a Chinese intelligence operative arrested in Belgium to the U.S. to face charges he conspired to steal trade secrets from GE Aviation and others. It was the first time prosecutors publicly identified someone in custody as a Chinese intelligence officer.

The Energy Department announced Thursday heightened controls on nuclear technology exports to China. The administration also signed off recently on Justice Department directives that force a pair of Chinese state media outlets to register as foreign agents.

The speed of the U.S. shift to a more confrontational China strategy has surprised many Chinese officials and sent Beijing scrambling to stabilize the relationship, with Washington the disrupter, analysts said.

“The U.S. is getting tougher and tougher, confronting China on all fronts,” said Zhu Feng, an expert on China-U.S. relations and international security at Nanjing University. “Beijing should be very coolheaded because does a new Cold War serve China’s interests? No.”

The U.S. moves represent an emphatic shift from a “constructive engagement” strategy that dates to the establishment of diplomatic ties in 1979. It was based on hopes China would slowly liberalize economically and politically.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, at a banquet on April 6, 2017, hosted by President Trump and first lady Melania Trump at the Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla.
Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, at a banquet on April 6, 2017, hosted by President Trump and first lady Melania Trump at the Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla. PHOTO: LAN HONGGUANG/XINHUA/GETTY IMAGES
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Underpinning the change is the view that China has reversed course since Mr. Xi took over in 2012 and began recentralizing political and economic controls, pledging to build his nation into a great world power.

The more aggressive U.S. approach was forecast last December in the National Security Strategy that put China on par with North Korea, Iran and jihadist terrorist groups as the biggest U.S. threats. At the time, the strategy contrasted with Mr. Trump’s personal diplomacy.

Early in his term, Mr. Trump flattered Mr. Xi, talking up a holiday card he received before taking office and sharing “the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake” at their Mar-a-Lago dinner in the spring of 2017. He scotched a campaign promise to label China a currency manipulator, saying he didn’t want to jeopardize a potential ally against the threat from North Korea.

Since then, White House advisers have changed to a more hawkish crew. And Mr. Trump has seen that his personal and controversial gambits—extending a lifeline to ZTE Corp., for instance—haven’t yielded enough in return. After a dozen phone calls with Mr. Xi, an exchange of letters and several face-to-face meetings, the tepid response from China has irritated the president, one senior administration official described, like death from a thousand cuts.

Beijing was infuriated by the U.S. decision last month to impose sanctions on a Chinese military agency—and its chief—for purchasing Russian SU-35 jet fighters and equipment related to its S-400 antiaircraft missile system, U.S. officials said.

China responded to the sanctions by lodging a formal complaint with the U.S. ambassador, ordering the return of its navy chief from a visit to Washington, and refusing permission for a U.S. Navy ship to port in Hong Kong.

Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi, speaking recently at the Council on Foreign Relations, said growing U.S. fears that China would seek global hegemony was a serious strategic misjudgment.

“Where this ends is a trade deal,” a senior administration official said. “Xi is starting to look at this and say, ‘Wow, Trump is doing the things he said he’s going to do,’ and realize that he has to get to work.’”

Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi speaks during a United Nations Security Council briefing on the U.N. General Assembly last month in New York City.
Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi speaks during a United Nations Security Council briefing on the U.N. General Assembly last month in New York City. PHOTO: EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
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Hard lessons

The November meeting between Messrs. Trump and Xi may help soothe tensions on trade but there appears little prospect the new U.S. stance will soften. There is a souring on China across Washington, even in groups that have long promoted stronger U.S.-China relations.

Many in the business community, for instance, have favored a “grow-together” policy with China, with the hope it would open the world’s second biggest economy to American companies. That optimism has turned to distrust, largely over China’s aggressive focus on acquiring U.S. technology.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has criticized China’s theft of intellectual property from American businesses, including with a scathing report on Beijing’s Made in China 2025 policy, a blueprint for turning China into a global manufacturing leader.

At the Pentagon, military brass have historically sought a relationship with their Chinese counterparts that would survive political mood swings. Even there, senior officials say they have reached their limit.

Efforts to build the U.S.-China military relationship by showing off American capabilities have been exploited by the Chinese. Gen. Joe Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, came away even more clear-eyed about that after a trip to Beijing last year to establish a formal military communication mechanism: An aide’s tablet, left in a hotel room, had been tampered with, souring the U.S. military establishment on doing business with China.

U.S. Gen. Joe Dunford, center right, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, joins  Chief of the General Staff of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, Gen. Fang Fenghui, left, during ceremonies last year in Beijing.
U.S. Gen. Joe Dunford, center right, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, joins Chief of the General Staff of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Gen. Fang Fenghui, left, during ceremonies last year in Beijing.PHOTO: ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
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This month, a Beijing trip by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, already stalled over a failure to agree on goals for the meeting, was canceled after a Chinese destroyer nearly clipped a U.S. Navy vessel in the South China Sea.

Mr. Trump first displayed an antagonistic posture toward China on the presidential campaign trail, referring to it as the enemy.

“I beat the people from China—I win against China,” Mr. Trump said at a campaign rally in 2015 in Bluffton, South Carolina. “You can win against China if you’re smart. But our people don’t have a clue. We give state dinners to the heads of China. I said, ‘Why are you doing state dinners for them? They’re ripping us left and right. Just take them to McDonald’s and go back to the negotiating table.’ Seriously. It’s true.”

The view caught on with his voters. Among Republicans who identify as Trump supporters, just 4% agreed that China was an ally, while 86% said it was an adversary, according to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll in April.

Plans for a tough approach to China were contemplated by the Trump administration shortly after the inauguration. Then came the diversions: North Korea launched missiles and tested rocket engines five times in the first 100 days. Trade disputes erupted not just with China, but also with the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

There also were calls for a more conciliatory approach to Beijing in those early days. Then-Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad asked Mr. Trump to tone down heated rhetoric because of significant trade between China and the farmers in his state. Mr. Branstad was selected to be the U.S. ambassador to China.

Henry Kissinger, the former secretary of state, met with Mr. Xi after the presidential election and returned saying that Mr. Trump shouldn’t be held to his campaign promises. Mr. Kissinger delivered a warm message from China’s leader to the president-elect.

Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, helped set up Mr. Trump’s trip to Beijing last year, and emphasized the importance of the relationship between the two countries. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin portrayed himself to the president and the Chinese as someone who could bridge the divide. Gary Cohn, the top national economic adviser, argued against imposing tariffs on China.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, left, and Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang last year in Washington, D.C.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, left, and Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang last year in Washington, D.C. PHOTO: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
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‘Unleashed’

Mr. Mnuchin’s efforts to act as a mediator have since yielded few results, reducing his influence over China policy and showing that negotiations with Beijing would be tougher than anticipated, people familiar with the matter said. Mr. Cohn is now gone, and Mr. Kushner has turned his focus elsewhere.

That has given way to more hawkish aides, including White House chief of staff John Kelly, a military veteran. His view of China, like Gen. Dunford’s, was hardened by experience, according to a person familiar with the matter.

During Mr. Trump’s visit to Beijing last fall, Mr. Kelly got into a physical altercation with a Chinese official who was seeking access to the nuclear football, the briefcase that includes the president’s mobile nuclear-missile command center. Mr. Kelly told colleagues that he refused to accept an apology, and he would only accept one if a senior Chinese official came to Washington and offered contrition while standing under a U.S. flag.

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, center, Terry Branstad, U.S. ambassador to China, right, and President Trump during a meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping last  year in Beijing.
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, center, Terry Branstad, U.S. ambassador to China, right, and President Trump during a meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping last year in Beijing. PHOTO: JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
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Peter Navarro, the president’s trade adviser, is a longtime China hawk and compiled a report this summer for Mr. Trump that showed how China’s economic aggression threatens the U.S. technology sector. He has been distributing a book to administration officials titled, “The Hundred-year Marathon: China’s Secret Strategy to Replace America As the Global Superpower.”

John Bolton, the new national security adviser, has long advocated for a tough approach to China. According to a senior administration official, Mr. Bolton has “unleashed” Matthew Pottinger, chief Asia adviser for the White House, to push for stronger China policies.

The views of Mr. Pottinger, a former U.S. Marine and former reporter for The Wall Street Journal, were reflected in the National Security Strategy that last year put China in the same threat category as North Korea and Iran. He helped oversee a research project detailing ways Beijing uses money to influence U.S. think tanks, universities and local governments.

Mr. Pottinger said at an event last month at the Chinese embassy in Washington that the White House had updated its China policy to clearly acknowledge the rivalry between the two nations. “For us in the United States,” he said, “competition is not a four-letter word.”

Looking ahead, U.S. officials expect continued pressure on China. A plan to punish private companies that help Beijing’s expansion in the South China Sea was discussed early in the administration but shelved. That type of sanction is being reviewed again.

White House officials said they expected more information would be declassified from the intelligence community’s study on China’s influence on U.S. elections and cyberspace. And the Commerce Department is set to tighten export controls, aimed at preventing U.S. surveillance technology from being used to suppress China’s Muslim Uighur minority.

The White House also expects to release a report in about a month reviewing U.S. foreign assistance. It will take aim at China and, at least indirectly, the country’s so-called Belt-and Road infrastructure development program, a senior administration official said.

Mr. Pence has criticized some of the related projects in the program, saying they leave nations buried in debt. “We seek a relationship grounded in fairness, reciprocity, and respect for sovereignty,” he said in his speech last week. “And we have taken strong and swift action to achieve that goal.”

Write to Michael C. Bender at Mike.Bender@wsj.com, Gordon Lubold at Gordon.Lubold@wsj.com, Kate O’Keeffe at kathryn.okeeffe@wsj.com and Jeremy Page at jeremy.page@wsj.com

https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-edges-toward-new-cold-war-era-with-china-1539355839?mod=hp_lead_pos1