Posts Tagged ‘Mujaheddin’

Hamas accused of playing into Israel’s hands in wake of Gaza protest

April 3, 2018

Times of Israel

Critics say the terror group has cast civil demonstrations as armed clashes by naming its members who were killed by the IDF

April 3 ,2018
.

Gaza's Hamas terrorist rulers released these images of members of its military wing who it acknowledged were among 16 Gazans it said were killed by Israeli fire during clashes along the security fence on Friday, March 30, 2018. (Hamas)

Gaza’s Hamas terrorist rulers released these images of members of its military wing who it acknowledged were among 16 Gazans it said were killed by Israeli fire during clashes along the security fence on Friday, March 30, 2018. (Hamas)

Palestinian analysts and activists on Monday criticized the Hamas terror group for claiming some of the Palestinians killed along the Israel-Gaza border in last Friday’s mass demonstrations as members of its military wing, a move the critics argued served Israel.

Hamas made a mistake in rushing to publish old photos of the dead men in military fatigues, thus creating the impression that they had been killed in “armed clashes” between Hamas fighters and the Israel Defense Forces as part of a violent terrorism campaign, the critics said.

Hamas announced shortly after Friday’s clashes that five of the Palestinians killed by IDF gunfire were members of the terror group’s military wing, Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades. The group published photos of the men wearing combat uniforms and armed with assault rifles.

The five, who were described by Hamas as mujaheddin (warriors), were identified as Jihad Farineh, 35, Mohammed Abu Amru, 27, Ahmed Ibrahim Odeh, 19, Sari Abu Odeh, 27, and Muss’ab Zuheir al Alsaloul, 23.

The Hamas critics also warned against the “militarization” of the “March of Return” — the name given to the protests — arguing that such a move would play into Israel’s hands and damage the Palestinian campaign. The Palestinians say that the Hamas men who killed last Friday were unarmed and were not in uniform.

One veteran Palestinian journalist in the Gaza Strip told The Times of Israel that Hamas was also facing criticism for holding military funerals and rallies for its men — a move that, he said, created the impression that the men had been killed in armed clashes with the IDF rather than during a peaceful protest by unarmed civilians.

“Many people here feel that Hamas made a mistake,” the journalist said. “Hamas’s actions have created the impression that what happened last Friday was an armed confrontation between its members and the Israeli army. Hamas has done damage to the Palestinian account that states that the demonstrations were peaceful and nonviolent.”

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

وكالة شهاب

@ShehabAgency

من حفل تأبين الشهيد القسامي احمد عودة
تصوير كرم عودة

The IDF on Saturday night identified 10 of the 15 people reported killed during violent protests along the Gaza security fence as members of Palestinian terrorist groups, and published a list of their names and positions in the organizations. Palestinian sources later raised the death toll to 16.

According to the IDF, eight of the men killed were members of Hamas, which rules the Gaza Strip, one served in Fatah’s al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades, and another was affiliated with “global jihad” — an apparent reference to one of the Salafist groups in the coastal enclave.

The army said that at least one of the Hamas members, Sari Abu Odeh, was part of the group’s elite Nukhba force and that another, Mohammad Abu Amro, served in its tunnel operations.

The IDF also identified one of two Hamas members who shot at Israeli soldiers on Friday evening and attempted to breach the security fence, before they were shot dead, as Mussa’b Alsaloul.

Fatalities from the March 30 violence on the Israel-Gaza border identified by Israel as members of terror groups. (Israel Defense Forces)

Palestinian political analyst Hassan Abdo said Hamas had made a mistake when it issued military communiques boasting of the death of its members.

“It was wrong to issue communiques with the photos of the martyrs in military uniform,” Abdo told the Palestinian Quds news agency. “These men were killed during a peaceful civilian march.”

Abdo said that Hamas’s actions made it easy for Israel to say that half of the Palestinians killed last Friday were operatives and leaders in Hamas’s military wing.

Another political analyst, Fahmi Sharab, concurred. “We need to distance ourselves from military manifestations,” he said. “Israel has succeeded in exploiting the photos of the Qassam men who participated in the marches even though they were unarmed.”

Sharab said that it was also wrong for Hamas fighters to approach the security fence because many of them were on Israel’s list of wanted terrorists.

Sharab and other Palestinians in the Gaza Strip stressed the importance of maintaining the “peaceful” nature of the “March of Return” so as not to lose the sympathy of the international community.

Other Palestinians said that Hamas’s actions after Friday’s events showed that the terror group was trying to “hijack” the “March of Return” by making it appear as if it was the sole leader of the protest.

Palestinian protesters pray during a demonstration against Israel along the Gaza Strip border east of Khan Younis, Friday, March 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

Referring to Hamas’s public endorsement of its “fighters,” Tawfik Abu Khoussa, a senior Fatah operative and former chairman of the Palestinian Journalists Syndicate, said, “Some parties that have been trading with the blood of the martyrs and injured quickly tried to add the sacrifices of the victims to their factional balance.”

Abu Khoussa said that even if Hamas’s intentions in endorsing “armed men of the resistance” were genuine, its actions had damaged the Palestinian nonviolent and popular campaign.

By publicly endorsing the victims and glorifying them as fighters, Hamas has also helped Israel’s “propaganda machine in distorting the March of Return in the eyes of the international public opinion by denying its peaceful nature and justifying the killing of the protesters,” he added.

Abu Khoussa also criticized Hamas for holding military services and glorifying only its dead members, while ignoring the rest of the Palestinians who were killed during the Friday’s events.

https://www.timesofisrael.com/hamas-accused-of-playing-into-israels-hands-in-wake-of-gaza-protest/

Related:

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

In our Peace and Freedom search box, put in:

 

.
Advertisements

Taliban responds to Prince Harry: ‘It’s not a game—it’s very, very real’

January 22, 2013

Prince Harry targeted in fatal Taliban attack on 'impregnable' military base

 
Above: Britain’s Prince Harry (left). Photo: John Stillwell/REUTERS

Taliban leaders have fired back at Prince Harry over the royal’s comments that piloting a helicopter in Afghanistan—where he says he killed insurgents during his recent tour of duty—is like playing a video game.

Harry, who co-piloted an Apache helicopter during his 20-week tour, made the comparison in an interview broadcast by the BBC Monday night.

“It’s a joy for me because I’m one of those people who loves playing PlayStation and Xbox,” the 28-year-old said. “So with my thumbs I like to think I’m probably quite useful.”

The Taliban did not appreciate the comparison.

By | The Lookout 

“This statement is not even worth condemning. It is worse than that,” Zabihullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman, told London’s Telegraph. “To describe the war in Afghanistan as a game demeans anyone—especially a prince, who is supposed to be made of better things.”

Mujahid continued: “It shows the lack of understanding, of knowledge. It shows they are unfamiliar with the situation and shows why they are losing. … It’s not a game. It’s very, very real.”

In comments published in the Daily Mirror on Monday, Harry confirmed that he killed Taliban insurgents during his deployment.

“Yeah, so lots of people have,” Harry said. “The squadron’s been out here. Everyone’s fired a certain amount.”

The prince, known as Captain Wales and nicknamed “Ugly,” said he fired on the Taliban during an attack on Camp Bastion in southern Afghanistan last fall. “Take a life to save a life,” he said. “That’s what we revolve around, I suppose.”

A few days before the insurgent attack on Camp Bastion, Mujahid had told Reuters: “We are using all our strength to get rid of him, either by killing or kidnapping.”

Sharifullah Kamawal, a member of the Afghan parliament, told the Telegraph that Harry’s latest comments could disrupt relations between soldiers and locals there.

“This makes the withdrawal process much faster, because for now half of the people say the foreign forces must stay for longer,” Kamawal said. “But if they say these kind of things, then more people will want them to go home.”

 

****************************

 

Prince Harry ‘driving wedge between forces and Afghan locals’

Prince Harry’s comments comparing the decade-long conflict in Afghanistan with computer games have driven a wedge between international forces and the local population, an Afghan MP has warned.

Prince Harry 'driving wedge between forces and Afghan locals'

.
Prince Harry credited his effectiveness as an Apache gunner to his skill at playing video games. “It’s a joy for me because I’m one of those people who loves playing PlayStation and Xbox, so with my thumbs I like to think that I’m probably quite useful,” he said Photo: JOHN STILLWELL/PA
 

By , Zubair Babakarkhail in Kabul

In an interview timed to coincide with his departure after a 20-week tour, the prince described his role as co-pilot of an Apache helicopter, in charge of its weapons systems, firing Hellfire air-to-surface missiles, rockets and a 30-millimetre gun.

“It’s a joy for me because I’m one of those people who loves playing PlayStation and Xbox, so with my thumbs I like to think I’m probably quite useful,” he said.

The unguarded comments could prove a headache for President Hamid Karzai, who has staked his reputation on working closely with Nato-led forces and wants the US to station troops in Afghanistan beyond the end of 2014.

Sharifullah Kamawal, a member of the Afghan parliament, warned that the comments had handed the Taliban a propaganda victory.

“This makes the withdrawal process much faster, because for now half of the people say the foreign forces must stay for longer, but if they say these kind of things then more people will want them to go home,” he said.

Taliban commanders branded Prince Harry a naïve “coward” for his comments.

Two senior figures told The Daily Telegraph that the unguarded description was an insult to the men who had fought and died alongside Captain Wales.

HRH Prince Harry or just plain Captain Wales as he is known in the British Army, wears his monocle gun sight as he sits in the front seat of his cockpit while serving as an Apache Helicopter Pilot/Gunner with 662 Sqd Army Air Corps

Zabihullah Mujahid, Taliban spokesman, said Prince Harry was a “coward” for speaking only after he was out of harm’s way.

“This statement is not even worth condemning. It is worse than that,” he said by telephone from an undisclosed location.

“To describe the war in Afghanistan as a game demeans anyone – especially a prince, who is supposed to be made of better things.”

He added that it exposed the calibre of forces that Nato was able deploy.

“It shows the lack of understanding, of knowledge,” he said. “It shows they are unfamiliar with the situation and shows why they are losing.”

A Taliban commander in Helmand, where Prince Harry was based, said soldiers from dozens of countries were fighting in Afghanistan. To describe their efforts – and deaths – as part of a game was to show a lack of respect, he said.

“It’s not a game. It’s very, very real,” he said.

Taliban likens US role in Afghanistan to Vietnam War

January 2, 2013

kabul_troops_082712.jpg

In this Aug. 27, 2012 photo provided by the U.S. Army, U.S. soldiers from the 4th Brigade, 82nd Airborne arrive to turn in their vehicles and equipment as part of the drawdown at the Kandahar Air Field south of Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP)

KABUL, Afghanistan –  The Taliban Wednesday likened the planned withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan to America’s pullout from Vietnam, calling it a “declare victory and run” strategy, according to the Associated Press.

A statement from the militant group said the ongoing transfer of security operations from U.S. troops to Afghan forces was merely a retreat similar to the American withdrawal from South Vietnam prior to the communist victory there in 1975.

Fox News - Fair & Balanced

The Associated Press reports American-led NATO troops are scheduled to pull out of Afghanistan by the end of 2014, although the U.S. will leave a residual force behind and other NATO countries have pledged continuing support of the Kabul government.

“They want to flee from Afghanistan just as they turned tail and ran from Vietnam,” the Taliban statement said. “When America faced utter destruction in Vietnam, they came up with the formula `declare victory and run’ and want to utilize the formula of `transfer security and run’ here in Afghanistan.”

Meanwhile, one of Afghanistan’s most feared warlords voiced fierce criticism of Britain’s role in the region, and launched specific insults at British royal Prince Harry, who is serving his second tour in the region.

In an exclusive interview with the Daily Telegraph, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, who has been designated a global terrorist by the U.S., said that “the British prince comes to Afghanistan to kill innocent Afghans while he is drunk. He wants to hunt down Mujaheddin with his helicopter rockets without any shame.

Gulbuddin Hekmatyar

“But he does not understand this simple fact that hunting of Afghan lions and eagles is not that easy,” Hekmatyar continued. “Jackals cannot hunt lions.”

The warlord also reportedly vowed to kill as many troops as possible before the UK’s withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/
01/02/taliban-likens-us-role-in-afghanistan
-to-vietnam-war

Related:

Prince Harry is a ‘jackal’ killing innocents, says feared Afghanistan warlord

January 1, 2013

Prince Harry targeted in fatal Taliban attack on 'impregnable' military base

Above: Britain’s Prince Harry (left). Photo: John Stillwell/REUTERS

By , Abdur Rauf Yousafzai in Peshawar

The Telegraph

 One of Afghanistan’s most feared warlords has launched a withering attack on Prince Harry, who has spent Christmas serving in the country, labelling the prince a ‘jackal’ who was ‘drunk’ while hunting innocent Afghans.

In a rare and exclusive interview with The Daily Telegraph Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, who has been designated a global terrorist by the United States, heaped insults on the British Royal and vowed to kill as many troops as possible before the UK’s withdrawal in 2014.

Speaking from an undisclosed location the warlord accused Britain of dragging “herself into this unjustified, useless but cruel conflict to please the White House. The British did not gain anything instead they lost blood and treasure.”

“I do not understand how the British public accept their children being sent to certain death in order to please American generals.

Gulbuddin Hekmatyar

Turning to Prince Harry he said that “the British Prince comes to Afghanistan to kill innocent Afghans while he is drunk. He wants to hunt down Mujaheddin with his helicopter rockets without any shame.

“But he does not understand this simple fact that the hunting of Afghan lions and eagles is not that easy! Jackals cannot hunt lions.”

Pointing to a recent attack on a base where Prince Harry was located he said: “During the Mujaheddin attack on the American base the Prince saw that he was the one about to be hunted and was searching for a hole in which to hide himself.”

And he added: ‘It seems that some British authorities still dream about the times of the eighteenth and nineteenth century and they want their ambassador to be treated like a viceroy and their prince to go out in uniform to hunt for human beings and play the satanic role that they used to play in the past.’

The warlord’s comments came in an interview with the Daily Telegraph from a mountain base, reported to be close to the Afghan/Pakistan border.