Posts Tagged ‘Padilla’

Philippine National Police Criticized For Removing Police Proitection from Polictican Who Was Gunned Down Days Later

May 28, 2018
By:  – Reporter / @VinceNonatoINQ
 / 06:27 PM May 28, 2018

APPEAL With the portrait of slain former La Union Rep. Eufranio Eriguel in the background, his widow, incumbent Rep. Sandra Eriguel, appeals to authorities to hasten the investigation of her husband’s murder. With the lawmaker is Senior Supt. Reynaldo Tamondong of the Ilocos regional police. FILE PHOTO

La Union 2nd Dist. Rep. Sandra Eriguel has urged her colleagues in the House of Representatives to “look into the actions of the Philippine National Police days before the brutal and cowardly murder” of her husband, former Rep. Eufranio Eriguel.

In a privilege speech late Monday, Sandra said that had local police officials acted on their request for police assistance, “the shooting incident could have been prevented and my husband would be alive today.”

Sandra revealed that hours before Eriguel was gunned down while giving a speech on May 12, the couple had pleaded with Police Senior Supt. Genaro Sapiera not to pull out “all of our security detail.”

Image result for philippine national police, photos

However, Sapiera, then the provincial director of La Union Provincial Police Office, said he was following orders from Police Chief Supt. Romulo Sapitula, the regional director of PNP Regional Office 1.

Sandra added that the barangay chairman of Capas in Agoo municipality wrote a May 7 letter to then-Agoo police chief Police Chief Insp. Alfredo Padilla Jr. to seek police assistance during the general assembly of barangay election candidates that Eriguel was set to attend.

However, Padilla allegedly did not act on the said request.

Image result for philippine national police, photos

“Without our police security detail, each one of us was left vulnerable to any attack. But Congressman Franny never wavered in his resolve to be with and fight for the people,” Sandra said.

Sandra said the House could prevent such murders from being committed again.

“Sowing fear upon the people through intimidation and violence should never be the basis for voting our leaders, but rather, to vote freely and based on personal preference should be the basis for voting our leaders. Truly, violence has no place in any civilized society,” Sandra said.

“We also owe it to the people, most especially to the peace-loving people of La Union, to pass relevant laws that can stop this culture of violence. We must not let fear envelope our people and our nation. This must end here,” she added.

Image result for philippine national police, photos

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/995058/eriguel-pnp-pulled-out-security-detail-before-hubbys-killing#ixzz5GnlwupEf
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Advertisements

U.S. Navy says it has been flying P-8 reconnaissance planes out of Philippines

February 28, 2015

.

Pilots perform preflight checks aboard a P-8A before a mission from Perth, Australia, in this file image from April 2014. The plane has now made more than 180 hours of missions from the Philippines. | U.S. NAVY

Reuters

The United States has been flying its most advanced surveillance aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, out of the Philippines for patrols over the South China Sea, the U.S. Navy said on Thursday, acknowledging the flights for the first time.

The United States, the Philippines’ oldest and closest ally, has promised to share “real time” information on what is happening in Philippine waters as China steps up its activities in the South China Sea.

P-8A Poseidon

China claims most of the potentially energy-rich South China Sea, through which $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes every year. The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan also have overlapping claims.

The U.S. Navy said in a statement it demonstrated the capabilities of P-8A in both littoral and open ocean environments, and explained to Philippine forces the functions that the aircraft’s sensors are capable of.

“It was a remarkable opportunity to work alongside the members of the Filipino armed forces,” said U.S. Navy Lieutenant Matthew Pool, Combat Air Crew 4 patrol plane commander.

“Sharing this aircraft’s capabilities with our allies only strengthens our bonds.”

The United States says it does not take sides in disputes between China and other South China Sea claimants and it calls on them to negotiate a formal maritime Code of Conduct.

The Unites States has also called for a freeze on provocative acts in the sea but China rejects U.S. involvement in the dispute.

China accuses the United States of emboldening claimants such as the Philippines and Vietnam with its military “pivot” back to Asia.

The P-8A was deployed in the Philippines for three weeks until Feb. 21, making more than 180 flight hours over the South China Sea, the U.S. Navy said.

Colonel Restituto Padilla, a spokesman for the Philippine armed forces, said the U.S. Navy has been operating P-3C Orions since 2012 from Philippine bases under a bilateral security agreement that sees U.S. forces rotate through the Philippines.

He said P-8A aircraft replaced the Orions on the rotations last year but the allies had made no announcement of its flights.

“We expect more surveillance planes to be deployed in the Philippines, increasing the frequency of rotation,” Padilla said.

Related:

U.S. Sends Its Newest Maritime Surveillance Aircraft To Watch The South China Sea

February 27, 2015

Reuters

MANILA – The United States has begun flying its most advanced surveillance aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, out of the Philippines for patrols over the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea), the US Navy said on Thursday, acknowledging the flights for the first time.

The United States, the Philippines’ oldest and closest ally, has promised to share “real time” information on what is happening in Philippine waters as China steps up its activities in the South China Sea.

P-8A Poseidon

China claims most of the potentially energy-rich South China Sea, through which $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes every year. The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan also have overlapping claims.

The U.S. Navy said in a statement it demonstrated the capabilities of P-8A in both littoral and open ocean environments, explaining the aircraft’s multi-mission sensors to Philippine forces.

“It was a remarkable opportunity to work alongside the members of the Filipino armed forces,” said U.S. Navy Lieutenant Matthew Pool, Combat Air Crew 4 patrol plane commander.

“Sharing this aircraft’s capabilities with our allies only strengthens our bonds.”

The United States says it does not take sides in disputes between China and other South China Sea claimants and it calls on them to negotiate a formal maritime Code of Conduct.

The Unites States has also called for a freeze on provocative acts in the sea but China rejects U.S. involvement in the dispute.

China accuses the United States of emboldening claimants such as the Philippines and Vietnam with its military “pivot” back to Asia.

The P-8A was deployed in the Philippines for three weeks until Feb. 21, making more than 180 flight hours over the South China Sea, the U.S. Navy said.

Colonel Restituto Padilla, a spokesman for the Philippine armed forces, said the U.S. Navy has been operating P-3C Orions since 2012 from Philippine bases under a bilateral security agreement that sees U.S. forces rotate through the Philippines.

He said P-8A aircraft replaced the Orions on the rotations last year but the allies had made no announcement of its flights.

“We expect more surveillance planes to be deployed in the Philippines, increasing the frequency of rotation,” Padilla said.

**************************

Philippine Star

MANILA, Philippines – The United States has deployed its newest and most advanced surveillance aircraft for patrols over the West Philippine Sea and South China Sea.

The P-8A Poseidon aircraft completed more than 180 flight hours from Feb. 1 to 21 from Clark Air Base, according to the US Navy’s 7th Fleet.

The US Navy said the flights sought to “strengthen maritime partnerships in the Indo-Asia-Pacific.”

Armed Forces spokesman Col. Restituto Padilla said the surveillance aircraft patrolled the West Philippine Sea “to ensure freedom of navigation and security of sea lanes of sea communications.”

“It is in the interest of everyone to ensure that commerce and trade really flow in these seas and that it is not hampered,” Padilla told a press conference yesterday. “It is in the interest of everyone that we watch over this with our allies.”

He said the deployment of the surveillance aircraft did not violate Philippine sovereignty.

“It was approved under the MDB-SEB (Mutual Defense Board – Security Engagement Board) under the purview of the Mutual Defense Treaty (MDT),” he pointed out.

The Philippines signed the MDT with the US in 1951 “to strengthen… collective defense for the preservation of peace and security.”

The treaty serves as the basis for the two country’s successive defense deals, namely the Visiting Forces Agreement and the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement.

Padilla clarified that the flights were not directed against China, which has been occupying and building structures in disputed areas to assert its territorial claims.

China claims most of the potentially energy-rich area, through which $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes every year. The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan also have overlapping claims.

“They (US) said they don’t take sides in the dispute in Asia and we respect the United States for that statement but just the same, it is to the interest of everyone to ensure that commerce and trade really flows in these seas and that it is not hampered,” Padilla said.

Pelicans of Patrol Squadron (VP) 45, the unit handling the P-8A Poseidon, hosted members of the Philippine Air Force and Navy in what it described as a “familiarization flight.”

The 7th Fleet said the flight provided an opportunity for the US to “increase understanding and showcase the capabilities of the Navy’s newest maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft.”

“It was a remarkable opportunity to work alongside the members of the Filipino Armed Forces,” said US Navy Lt. Matthew Pool, Combat Air Crew 4 patrol plane commander.

“Sharing this aircraft’s capabilities with our allies only strengthens our bonds,” he said.

Padilla said the mission also allowed the US and Filipino troops to share information.

“There are Filipino nationals involved and whatever sharing of information we have there is also for our interest,” he said.

He said P-8A aircraft replaced the Orions on the rotations last year but the allies had made no announcement of its flights.

“We expect more surveillance planes to be deployed in the Philippines, increasing the frequency of rotation,” Padilla said.

The US Navy described the P-8A as the most advanced long-range anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare aircraft in the world.

“The new P-8A is part of the Navy’s commitment to the Pacific rebalance, bringing latest technology to US 7th Fleet to ensure the US is best postured to honor its commitment to regional security and stability,” the US Navy’s 7th Fleet said.

The US says it does not take sides in disputes between China and other claimants and it calls on them to negotiate a formal maritime Code of Conduct.

The US has also called for a freeze on provocative acts in the sea but China rejects US involvement in the dispute.

China accuses the US of emboldening claimants such as the Philippines and Vietnam with its military “pivot” back to Asia.

Restraint, responsibility

China is defending its activities in the South China Sea as restrained and responsible after the US intelligence chief called its expansion of outposts in the region an “aggressive” effort to assert sovereignty.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said yesterday that the country’s activities on shoals and in surrounding waters that it claims are “reasonable, legitimate and legal” and that Beijing has shown “restraint and responsibility.”

China says it has historical claims to a huge swath of the South Sea China that overlaps the claims of several neighbors including Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan and the Philippines, and it objects to what it considers US meddling.

US Director of National Intelligence James Clapper cited China’s expansion of its outposts, including for the stationing of ships and potential airfields, at a US Senate hearing in Washington on Thursday. His comments underscored US concerns about land reclamation activities that could fuel tensions between China and its neighbors.

Clapper described China’s claim to more than 80 percent of the South China Sea as “exorbitant.”

The US says it has a national interest in the peaceful resolution of the disputes in the region.  – AP

Related:

Philippines to buy two C-130 transport planes from U.S. Navy

January 10, 2015

.

(Reuters) – The Philippine military on Friday signed a pact with the U.S. Navy to buy two secondhand C-130 transport planes to boost its capability to fan out quickly for territorial defense and humanitarian operations.

Washington has been helping develop the military capability of its former colony in the face of serious security challenges in the South China Sea, as China steps up its presence in disputed areas.

China claims almost all of the sea, believed to be rich in mineral and oil-and-gas deposits. Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam, Taiwan and the Philippines also have claims on the waters, traversed by about $5 trillion of ship-borne trade each year.

“The United States is helping us pay for these two aircraft,” Colonel Restituto Padilla, a spokesman for the Armed Forces of the Philippines, said, adding that the U.S. State Department would provide about $20 million in foreign military financing.

“We have requested some 1.6 billion pesos to complete the purchase of the transport planes,” he added, referring to a sum equivalent to $35.61 million.

The transport planes, to be delivered early next year, will take to five the number of mission-ready C-130s, for a boost in the number and capacity of existing medium-lift aircraft.

In 2014, Washington allocated military assistance funds of $50 million to the Philippines. Besides the C-130s, the funds were used to install weapons on two frigates, also acquired from the U.S. coast guard.

Padilla said the transport planes would be used to rapidly deploy troops in the fight against Muslim and Maoist-led rebels and carry relief to disaster-hit areas.

The purchase is part of a 90-billion-peso ($2-billion), five-year upgrade plan to catch up with Southeast Asian neighbors.

($1=44.9250 Philippine pesos)

(Reporting by Manuel Mogato; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)