Posts Tagged ‘Peter Strzok’

Constant Trump Bashing — An undercurrent of narrow-mindedness, bigotry, and snobbery that is both unintelligent and unattractive

July 15, 2018

AMERICA’S most famous lawyer, Alan Dershowitz, has been in hot water recently – an experience that tells you a lot about how Donald Trump has scrambled people’s brains.

Dershowitz once defended OJ Simpson, but the stick he got for that was nothing compared to the attacks he’s received for defending President Trump over alleged legal abuses in the ongoing Trump/Russia investigation.

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Dershowitz is a lifelong Democrat. He backed Hillary Clinton. And yet this year he has been completely ostracised by his former friends and the chattering classes at their swanky summer retreats.

So it’s with some trepidation that I write here in defence of Donald Trump. I can predict the howls of outrage: “He’s a fascist! He loves dictators! He kills babies!” (Or perhaps: “He is a baby — a giant inflatable one”). Yep, we get it: You don’t like Trump.

Bashing Trump is certainly fashionable. But there’s a narrow-mindedness and bigotry to the attacks that is both unintelligent and unattractive.

Look, I’m not a fan of everything Donald Trump has said or done. On my weekly TV show on Fox News I’ve criticised him over remarks he has made and some of his policies.

On top of that, I’ve pursued the dodgy dealings and conflicts of interest of some of Donald Trump’s cabinet members.

But is there another side to the story?

Because of the snobbery and bias of much of the British media who look down their noses at Trump because he’s a businessman not a policy wonk, because he likes McDonald’s not haute cuisine — and because he speaks in plain English instead of the highfalutin’ bureaucratic claptrap you normally get from politicians, I suspect most people in the UK get a uniformly negative presentation of the Trump presidency.

Well, I like to think of Sun readers as reasonable and open-minded, so I know you will want to see things in their proper perspective.

Back in 2016 I thought Donald Trump would make a better president than Hillary Clinton for three main reasons.

FIRST, he promised to get the economy moving, to reverse the decades-long slump in jobs and incomes that was the result of the elitist policies pursued by Democrats and Republicans. Trump promised to slash red tape and cut taxes.

He has delivered spectacularly: A massive reduction in regulations and a dramatic tax reform have led to a transformation in business confidence and investment.

That translated into the first significant pay rises for ordinary Americans for decades, and historic falls in unemployment — including the lowest unemployment rates ever recorded for black Americans.

The SECOND big argument for Trump was his pledge to control immigration. The elitists focused on his harsh rhetoric. But working Americans understood what none of the establishment politicians was prepared to admit: That uncontrolled immigration meant an uncontrolled flow of cheap, imported labour that undermined wage rates.

Again, Trump has delivered. Immigration enforcement has been stepped up and the overall numbers are down. Trump wants to go further but needs Congress to get its act together.

The THIRD key promise was to “Drain The Swamp”. By this he meant taking on the system of cronyism and corruption in Washington DC that puts the real power in the hands of big business, wealthy donors, shadowy lobbyists and faceless bureaucrats in the “Deep State”.

Here too there has been progress. There is more to do but the Trump administration has implemented the toughest ever clampdown on federal government employees leaving their jobs to lobby from the private sector.

And the biggest change of all might turn out to be Trump’s assault on the unaccountable, unelected bureaucrats of the Deep State — not just by cutting regulations but by appointing judges at every level who are committed to reining in the power of the bureaucracy.

All this go-ahead drive and energy is such a contrast with Theresa May’s lacklustre and uninspiring drift.

Yes, she is decent, hard-working and utterly sincere in her sense of duty.

But that’s not enough at this crucial moment for Britain.

What’s missing is the optimism, dynamism and leadership needed to reject the negative, defeatist view of the civil service bureaucrats who see Brexit as a threat to be minimised.

Instead, Britain needs a Prime Minister who truly believes that leaving the EU behind is a golden opportunity to make the country richer and fairer.

Obsessing about “the deal” with Brussels is a waste of time and energy. The impact of any deal is trivial compared to the difference that a positive populist policy agenda could make: Investing in skills and infrastructure to boost workers’ productivity and wages; cutting business rates and regulations to help entrepreneurs; cutting the corporate tax rate to ten per cent to make Britain the world’s most attractive business location.

And of course — the “big, beautiful trade deal” with America that Donald Trump promised but Theresa May’s disastrous anti-Brexit plan rules out.

Whether you love or loathe Donald Trump — and remember, in America he has the second highest own-party approval ratings of any president since World War Two — everyone in Britain should hope that Theresa May picks up some of his positive, pro-enterprise exuberance.

  • Steve Hilton is David Cameron’s former director of strategy.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/opinion/6767261/steve-hilton-donald-trump-theresa-may/

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Devin Nunes: Indictment of Russians Contains Nothing New, But Leaves Out Attacks on Republicans (Information in the Indictment Was Known 18 Months Ago by The House Intelligence Committee)

July 15, 2018

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Devin Nunes is the Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee

Related:

Hillary Clinton speaking during a campaign event in Columbus, Ohio, on Monday.

Personal, not secure, “home-brew” email server?

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and closeup

John Podesta: His password was “password”.

Peter Strzok’s arrogance is the product of a corrupt FBI — The death of public trust in the Department of Justice

July 15, 2018

Watching FBI agent Peter Strzok battle with Congress, my initial reaction was pure anger. His repeated, arrogant insistence that he had done nothing wrong despite tons of evidence to the contrary convinced me he deserved immediate firing — if not the firing squad.

Gradually, though, anger gave way to amazement as Strzok grew increasingly combative and condescending. Given his predicament, the sneering and smirking were stupid, and yet he persisted.

By Michael Goodwin
New York Post

Who is this jerk, I wondered, and how in the hell did he get to be a big shot at the FBI? And why are taxpayers still paying for the privilege of his malignant presence on the FBI payroll?

My answers can be summarized in four names: James Comey, Jeff Sessions, Rod Rosenstein and Christopher Wray. They are chief culprits in the death of public trust in the Department of Justice.

The cause of death was murder, and it was an inside job.

Strzok, whose voluminous texts with his office lover show him to be a king of partisan bias, rose to leadership positions under former FBI director Comey — and it shows. Comey’s self-righteousness was his ultimate undoing, but not before he led the agency into a double death grip of corruption and rank partisanship.

Blinded by his own ambition, Comey brushed aside superiors, rules and maybe laws while giving Hillary Clinton a free pass and turning the screws on Donald Trump. Comey defends himself by saying he sought to protect the FBI’s independence, as if it — and he — are a fourth branch of government that is beyond accountability from the other three.

In the end, he disgraced the agency and himself, though gained consolation in the millions he made by selling his book to Trump haters.

But the FBI didn’t stink only from the head — Comey’s deputy, Andrew McCabe, also was fired, and could be prosecuted for allegedly being dishonest with investigators about a media leak.

Strzok appears to be a chip off the Comey/McCabe block. Like them, he insists he is committed to the FBI’s high standards, but his reprehensible conduct makes a mockery of his claims.

His stated contempt for Trump and his promise to stop him from becoming president render Strzok unfit to be a dogcatcher.

But, aping his mentors, he nonetheless demands his denials of wrongdoing be accepted as if his integrity is self-evident. All three believe they are entitled to trust and respect, without having to earn or return either.

Sessions, as attorney general, is nominally the boss over his deputy, Rosenstein, and FBI director Wray. But by recusing himself from anything related to the 2016 campaign, Sessions abdicated the most important part of his job.Which brings us to Sessions, Rosenstein and Wray. How can they stomach the likes of Strzok and refuse to clean the stables?

As I have said, his appointment was Trump’s biggest mistake, one that denied the president and the nation a functioning attorney general. The most critical result is the unchecked and apparently endless investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller.

Speaking of which, breathes there a soul who believes the timing of Mueller’s latest batch of ghost indictments of Russians has nothing to do with Trump’s planned meeting with Vladimir Putin? The timing shows Rosenstein, who announced the charges, and Mueller are neck deep in politics by trying to force Trump to confront Putin about the meddling charges.

Is that their job? Would they embarrass and try to box in Barack Obama or any other president?

Their decision persuades me both harbor suspicion of Trump’s legitimacy, and thus feel entitled to abuse their powers to wade into issues that are none of their business. In that way, they are no better than Comey, McCabe and Strzok — applying a double standard of law enforcement based on their personal views. That makes them, at the least, allies of the resistance.

Rosenstein’s stonewalling conduct toward Congress over Russia-probe documents is especially suspicious. Claims he threatened members and their staffs ring true, and, if they are, it means he lied under oath when he denied making any threats.

But, thanks to the somnolent Sessions, we can add Rosenstein to the long list of those above accountability. A real attorney general — oh, what’s the use? Sessions is not a real attorney general and never will be.

Then there is Comey’s successor, Christopher Wray. He looks as if he wandered into the wrong movie theater and can’t find the exit.

He defined himself as unwilling to tackle the mess he inherited by downplaying the devastating Inspector General report on the handling of the Clinton investigation. While conceding the findings made it “clear we’ve got some work to do,” he minimized them by saying, “It’s focused on a specific set of events back in 2016, and a small number of FBI employees connected with those events. Nothing in the report impugns the integrity of our workforce as a whole, or the FBI as an institution.”

Baloney. While it’s true only a fraction of the total employees were singled out, they were the director of the FBI, his top deputy, the deputy’s top lawyer and Strzok, the head of counterintelligence.He defined himself as unwilling to tackle the mess he inherited by downplaying the devastating Inspector General report on the handling of the Clinton investigation. While conceding the findings made it “clear we’ve got some work to do,” he minimized them by saying, “It’s focused on a specific set of events back in 2016, and a small number of FBI employees connected with those events. Nothing in the report impugns the integrity of our workforce as a whole, or the FBI as an institution.”

Others were also faulted, but not named, including an agent who tried to get his son a job on Clinton’s campaign while sending campaign boss John Podesta “heads up” e-mails.

And so the corruption of the Justice Department proceeds, unmolested by actual justice. The voter revolution of 2016 has more work to do.

https://nypost.com/2018/07/14/peter-strzoks-arrogance-is-the-product-of-a-corrupt-fbi/?utm_source=twitter_sitebuttons&utm_medium=site%20buttons&utm_campaign=site%20buttons

Related:

Hillary Clinton speaking during a campaign event in Columbus, Ohio, on Monday.

Personal, not secure, “home-brew” email server?

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and closeup

John Podesta: His password was “password”.

Trump on Russia indictment: Why didn’t Obama do something?

July 14, 2018

President Donald Trump on Saturday reacted to the indictment of 12 Russian military officers “for conspiring to interfere with the 2016 presidential election” by blaming former President Obama and the “deep state.”

“The stories you heard about the 12 Russians yesterday took place during the Obama Administration, not the Trump Administration,” he tweeted from Scotland. “Why didn’t they do something about it, especially when it was reported that President Obama was informed by the FBI in September, before the Election?”

Obama issued sanctions against Russia for the meddling in the election in December 2016.

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He also expelled 35 Russian diplomats from the U.S. and ordered two Russian compounds to be closed.

Special counsel Robert Mueller is now leading the investigation into Russian interference in the election, as well as possible collusion within the Trump campaign. His probe led to the 12 indictments announced on Friday by the Justice Department. They are charged with hacking Democratic National Committee (DNC) officials and dispersing the stolen documents online.

The Trump administration has emphasized that the indictments do not indicate any level of collusion by a member of the Trump campaign. Trump has repeatedly said there was no collusion.

Trump went on to question “Where is the DNC Server, and why didn’t the FBI take possession of it?”

He proposed that the server could have been kept hidden by the “Deep State.”

The deep state is a conspiracy theory that claims high-level officials run a shadow government working against Trump.

Trump has suggested in the past a conspiracy around the computer servers at the DNC that Russians hacked during the election.

The FBI reportedly has not directly assessed the hacked server during the agency investigation, instead relying on information from a private security firm.

-Updated 10:32 a.m.

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/396999-trump-on-russian-indictments-why-didnt-obama-do-something

After the Strzok Stonewall

July 14, 2018

Here’s what Trump should declassify if he wants the truth known.

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Peter Strzok during a congressional hearing, July 12, 2018. Reuters photo

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FBI agent Peter Strzok’s appearance before Congress Thursday was a predictable political circus, and here’s what we learned: President Trump will have to declassify a host of documents if he wants Americans to learn the truth about what happened in 2016.

Mr. Strzok was combative, and he pointed to an FBI lawyer in the room as reason not to disclose much of anything about his investigation into the Russia connections of the Trump campaign. Under pressure from Ohio’s Jim Jordan, Mr. Strzok did reveal that Justice Department official Bruce Ohr acted as a channel between the opposition-research firm Fusion GPS and the FBI in 2016. We already knew that Mr. Ohr’s wife Nellie worked for Fusion.

This means that Fusion, an outfit on the payroll of the Clinton campaign, had a messenger on the government payroll to deliver its anti-Trump documents to the FBI. This confirms that the FBI relied on politically motivated sources as part of its probe, even as Mr. Strzok insists he showed no political bias in his investigating decisions.

Yet if this is the most Congress could pry out of the FBI’s lead Russia investigator over 10 hours, legislative oversight won’t discover the truth. Mr. Trump will have to help Congress by ordering Justice and the FBI to declassify the relevant documents. Consistent with protecting legitimate sources and methods, here is the document list Mr. Trump should want released:

• The FISA applications. Justice and the FBI made one application and three renewals for warrants against former Trump campaign aide Carter Page. The text of those applications would show the degree to which the FBI relied on the dossier compiled by Christopher Steele at the request of Fusion GPS. They would also show how honest FBI and Justice were with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that approves warrants.

• Woods procedures documents. The FBI is required to vet and support the facts its presents to a FISA court when it seeks a warrant to eavesdrop on a U.S. citizen. These rules are known as Woods procedures, and releasing sections of this Woods file would show the extent to which the FBI verified the dossier or other evidence it used as its justification to listen to Trump campaign aides. More broadly, Mr. Trump should declassify any document that demonstrates what the FBI and Justice knew about the provenance and accuracy of the Fusion-Steele dossier.

• The 302s. These forms include information taken from the notes FBI agents make while interviewing a source or subject. Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley last week asked Justice to declassify the 302s for 12 separate FBI interviews with Mr. Ohr concerning his contacts with Mr. Steele. Declassifying other 302s related to the subjects in this probe (including former Trump aides George Papadopoulos, Michael Flynn ) would reveal what the FBI was told, who provided what information, and how much came from politically motivated sources.

• The 1023s. These are the equivalent of 302s for counterintelligence, and they document FBI debriefings with informants or sources. Mr. Trump should declassify these and other documents showing interaction between the FBI and Mr. Steele, Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson, Fusion backer Dan Jones, informant Stefan Halper, or anyone the FBI used to keep tabs on the Trump campaign. These documents would reveal the extent and dates of the FBI investigation of the Trump campaign.

Mr. Trump is undoubtedly being told that declassifying these documents would set a bad precedent, or risk accusations that he is undermining special counsel Bob Mueller’s investigation. But the worst precedent would be letting mistrust and partisan suspicion persist over how law enforcement behaved during a presidential campaign.

Mr. Mueller’s probe is also moving ahead without interference, as his indictment Friday of a dozen Russian agents for hacking Democratic National Committee computers shows. But indictments of Russians who will never see a U.S. courtroom don’t tell us anywhere near the complete story. That duty falls to Congress, not to a special counsel whose job is deciding whether or not to prosecute crimes.

Mr. Trump is going to be attacked no matter what he does. He should declassify these records or stop complaining about his Justice Department’s lack of cooperation.

Appeared in the July 14, 2018, print edition.

Pelosi says Trump must demand that Putin stop Russia election meddling — Where’s America’s Cybersecurity?

July 14, 2018

President Donald Trump must seek a deal with Russian President Vladimir Putin to end Moscow’s interference in American elections, the top Democrat in the House of Representatives said on Friday after fresh indictments against Russian military officers.

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FILE PHOTO: House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a press conference on the Trump Administration’s tax cuts at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center in Washington, U.S., on June 22, 2018. REUTERS/Toya Sarno Jordan/File Photo

“President Trump must demand and secure a real, concrete and comprehensive agreement that the Russians will cease their ongoing attacks on our democracy,” House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi said in a statement. “Failure to stand up to Putin would constitute a profound betrayal of the Constitution and our democracy.”

Reuters

Reporting by Makini Brice and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Bernadette Baum

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“We reap what we sow…”

Peace and Freedom Note: 

America has to do what America can do. It seems to us, that we have little or no ability to “make Putin stop.” Our job here in the U.S. is to start to get serious about cybersecurity — or suffer the consequences….

A guy that gets a sexually transmitted disease can always blame the woman. But he should have worn a condom.

So all this kerfuffle about Robert Muller catching Russians who got emails from U.S. computers really overlooks the lack of very basic cybersecurity.

And maybe we should think again about the consequences for James Comey and Peter Strzok letting Hillary Clinton walk free for her inability to protect U.S. classified information while Secretary of State…..

It wasn’t careless. It was criminal.

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Peter Strzok during a congressional hearing, July 12, 2018. Reuters photo

Peace and Freedom

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Trump Pressed to Confront Putin After Mueller’s Indictments — But Didn’t Hillary Clinton Have a Private Email Server With No Government Security Protections While She Was Secretary of State?

July 14, 2018

A guy that gets a sexually transmitted disease can always blame the woman. But he should have worn a condom.

So all this kerfuffle about Robert Muller catching Russians who got emails from U.S. computers really overlooks the lack of very basic cybersecurity.

And maybe we should think again about the consequences for James Comey and Peter Strzok letting Hillary Clinton walk free for her inability to protect U.S. classified information while Secretary of State…..

Image result for peter strzok, photos

Peter Strzok during a congressional hearing, July 12, 2018. Reuters photo

Peace and Freedom

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From Bloomberg News

 

Whatever Donald Trump had hoped to get out of his summit with Vladimir Putin, Robert Mueller changed the game.

The U.S. president’s goals for the meeting had always been unclear. But now Trump is under pressure — including from several members of Congress from his own party — to finally confront Putin once and for all over trying to sabotage the election that put Trump in the White House.

Democrats called on him to scrap the summit in protest. That’s not happening, the White House said. And there’s no sign that Trump will demand that Putin turn over the 12 Russian intelligence officials the special counsel indicted — and they likely will never stand trial.

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But Monday’s meeting in Helsinki has become a pivotal test of Trump’s strength and will to defend election integrity — something he hasn’t done so far.

“It will be somewhat more difficult for him to simply go through the motions,” said Daniel Fried, who served as assistant secretary of state for Europe under President George W. Bush. “The point is to send Putin a very clear message: Stay out of our elections.”

‘Extensive Plot’

Senator John McCain, an Arizona Republican, said the indictments add to evidence confirming an “extensive plot” by the Kremlin to sow discord among American voters, attack the 2016 election, and undermine faith in democracy.

“President Trump must be willing to confront Putin from a position of strength and demonstrate that there will be a serious price to pay for his ongoing aggression towards the United States and democracies around the world,” McCain, the Republican presidential nominee in 2008, said in a statement. “If President Trump is not prepared to hold Putin accountable, the summit in Helsinki should not move forward.”

Trump focused his ire not on Putin but his predecessor, former President Barack Obama, in a series of tweets Saturday morning from his Turnberry golf club in Scotland.

“The stories you heard about the 12 Russians yesterday took place during the Obama Administration, not the Trump Administration,” Trump wrote. “Why didn’t they do something about it, especially when it was reported that President Obama was informed by the FBI in September, before the Election?”

DNC Server

In a subsequent tweet, Trump questioned why the FBI didn’t take possession of the Democratic National Committee server that was hacked by the Russians, and appeared to insinuate that a unsubstantiated and unexplained conspiracy involving the “Deep State.” Former FBI director James Comey said last year Democrats had opted to give the server to a third party that shared its analysis with the FBI, rather than turning it over directly to the government.

The tweets followed remarks at a press conference Friday where Trump belittled the idea of challenging the Russian president over election interference during a press conference on Friday just before the criminal charges were announced, though Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein had warned Trump earlier in the week the indictments were coming.

Donald Trump speaks on July 13.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

“I will absolutely, firmly ask the question” to Putin, Trump said at a news conference on Friday with U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May at Chequers, her country estate. But he suggested there was little point to the exercise..

Perry Mason Moment

“I don’t think you’ll have any ‘Gee, I did it, I did it, you got me,”’ Trump said. Referring to a TV courtroom drama of the 1950s and 1960s that often featured a dramatic, last-minute confession, he added, “There won’t be a Perry Mason here, I don’t think, but you never know what happens, right?”

Trump has previously shown little appetite for pressing the issue, telling reporters after meeting with Putin in Vietnam last November that he was done discussing it and that he believed the Russian leader’s denials were sincere.

“He said he didn’t meddle. He said he didn’t meddle. I asked him again. You can only ask so many times,” Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One after the meeting. “And I believe, I really believe, that when he tells me that, he means it.”

‘Not a Question’

Lawmakers from his own party said Friday that was no longer enough.

Republican Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona, a frequent critic of the president, said Trump must do more than ask.

“Mr. President, as today’s indictments reaffirm, election interference is not a question to be asked of Vladimir Putin, but a statement to be made to Vladimir Putin: You interfered in our elections,” Flake said on Twitter.

House Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce, a California Republican, said in a statement Friday that Trump “should use today’s indictments to challenge” Putin at the meeting.

A chorus of Democrats including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California said Trump must call off the summit.

“President Trump should cancel his meeting with Vladimir Putin until Russia takes demonstrable and transparent steps to prove that they won’t interfere in future elections,” Schumer said in a statement. “Glad-handing with Vladimir Putin on the heels of these indictments would be an insult to our democracy.”

No Russia Criticism

The White House’s initial reaction to the indictments was defensive and didn’t include any criticism of the Russian government or its indicted operatives, all of whom were identified as officials in Moscow’s main military intelligence agency, the GRU. The Russians are charged with stealing user names and passwords of people working in Democrat Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, including its chairman John Podesta, and hacking into the computer networks of other Democratic party organizations.

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John Podesta: His password was “password”.

White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said in a statement that “today’s charges include no allegations of knowing involvement by anyone on the campaign and no allegations that the alleged hacking affected the election result.”

Podesta said in an interview that at the summit “maybe he should ask Putin to turn over the 12 people indicted to the United States for trial.”

Trump has long downplayed Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, and has repeatedly referred to Mueller’s investigation as a “witch hunt” even as it has piled up guilty pleas and indictments of Russians and Trump campaign associates.

Better Putin Relationship

Trump suggested at stops in Europe that his primary goal for his meeting with Putin is a better relationship, though he also said he would discuss Russia’s incursions into Ukraine, the civil war in Syria and nuclear proliferation.

“We go into that meeting not looking for so much,” he told reporters at a news conference Thursday following a NATO summit in Brussels.

“I didn’t go in with high expectations,” Trump told reporters at the Friday press conference with May. “We do have political problem where — you know in the United States we have this stupidity going on. Pure stupidity. But it makes it very hard to do something with Russia. Anything you do, it’s always going to be, ‘Oh, Russia, he loves Russia.”’

The indictments are the most detailed explanation so far of how units of Russia’s GRU attempted to influence the 2016 election by stealing Democratic emails, then releasing them in ways meant to dominate news headlines as voters made up their minds.

Prosecutors also detailed a second Russian operation targeting the infrastructure that Americans use to cast their ballots and the officials that oversee those elections locally.

American intelligence agencies have concluded that Putin personally ordered a campaign to undermine “public faith in the U.S. democratic process” with the goal of hurting Clinton’s candidacy and ultimately helping to elect Trump.

— With assistance by Justin Sink, Margaret Talev, Tom Schoenberg, Michael Riley, and Steven T. Dennis

(Updates with Trump tweets starting in ninth paragraph.)
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https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-07-14/trump-under-pressure-to-confront-putin-after-mueller-indictments
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See also:
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John Podesta: ‘We Just Found Some Witches And They Were Indicted’

https://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/john-podesta-we-just-found-some-witches-and-they-were-indicted

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Related:

Hillary Clinton speaking during a campaign event in Columbus, Ohio, on Monday.

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Peter Strzok: absolutely shameless — Strzok delights Trump voters with a depressing display for all Americans to see

July 13, 2018

FBI agent Peter Strzok was full of indignant outrage Thursday as he testified before Congress, and all sides reacted accordingly.

Heck, The New York Times didn’t even wait for him to say Word One before posting a story headlined, “FBI Agent at Center of Russia Probe Turns Tables on GOP.”

But then, the Times knew Strzok planned to say that the mere fact of his being questioned is a “victory notch in Putin’s belt.”

Editorial
New York Post

This, from a guy who’s been slammed by the Justice Department inspector general for his highly unprofessional conduct while serving on the investigations of Hillary Clinton and the Trump campaign.

His worst breach of ethics was to conduct an affair with another member of the team. That relationship couldn’t help but compromise his judgment, and hers.

Add to that the bias evidenced by all the lovers’ Trump-bashing text messages — and by the fact that they couldn’t even resist sending them on a system that they had to know their superiors could access.

Strzok and his inamorata, Lisa Page, can insist forever that their bias didn’t impact either probe, but their lack of restraint is proof that they’d lost all objectivity.

And the fact that their colleagues either saw no sign of the romance, or didn’t care, speaks poorly of their professionalism, too.

Democrats took Strzok’s claims at face value, literally applauding him at one point. Republicans stuck to their partisan points, too.

But the basic facts speak for themselves: With his flagrant misconduct, Peter Strzok brought shame to the FBI and the entire Justice Department. He should be ashamed of himself, rather than playing the victim.

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