Posts Tagged ‘Philippine National Police’

Philippine National Police “Hidden Jail” Adds to List of Gross Human Rights Violations, Disregard for Rule of Law — “PNP exploiting the deadly campaign for their personal gain.” — Expect unlawful police abuses in the name of Duterte’s “war on drugs” to continue

April 28, 2017
Detainees huddle in a makeshift detention cell hidden behind a shelf in the Manila Police District’s Drug Enforcement Unit office on Thursday, April 27, 2017. “The facility housed a dozen men and women in atrocious, grossly overcrowded conditions,” Human Rights Watch said. STAR/Miguel de Guzman

MANILA, Philippines —  Signs of abuses in President Rodrigo Duterte’s brutal war on drugs will continue to surface after an allegedly hidden jail was discovered in Tondo, an international human rights organization said on Friday.

Phelim Kine, deputy director for Asia at New York-based Human Rights Watch, warned that elements of the Philippine National Police are exploiting the deadly campaign for their personal gain.

Representatives from the Philippines’ Commission on Human Rights trooped to Manila Police District Station 1 yesterday after receiving a tip that several personalities are held up and being extorted of P40,000 to P200,000 in exchange of their freedom.

The surprise visit of CHR led them to an airless cell concealed by a bookshelf at a police station in Tondo, an urban poor district in Manila.

“The facility housed a dozen men and women in atrocious, grossly overcrowded conditions,” Kine said in a statement.

Gilbert Boisner, a lawyer who serves as CHR’s head in Metro Manila, said that the detainees suffer from inhumane conditions inside the cell.

He earlier told the STAR that the detainees were hidden from the public and did not undergo inquest proceedings. At least four individuals also said they were being asked to produce money in exchange for freedom.

“Detainees said that inadequate lighting, ventilation, and toilet facilities forced them ‘to urinate and [do] bowel movements in plastic bags,” Kine said, citing Boisner.

In a television interview, Tondo station 1 commander Superintendent Roberto Domingo claimed that it was his initiative to use the vacant space in their office to accommodate other detainees since their cell is congested.

Domingo also denied the allegations they are extorting money.

“Hindi po tagong kulungan ‘yun, ‘yun po ay holding area kasi doon ang investigation room ng drug enforcement unit… wala na po kami mapaglagyan ng preso dahil sa dami,” Domingo told “State of the Nation” of GMA News TV.

The HRW, meanwhile, noted a similar case of alleged police abuse in the killing of Korean businessman Jee Ick Joo. The victim was abducted and killed by cops inside the PNP national headquarters in Quezon City.

“The officers—members of the Anti-Illegal Drugs Group – used a fake arrest warrant that falsely accused him of illegal drug activities. They reportedly strangled Jee to death that same day, but two weeks later demanded—and received—a $100,000 ransom from his family,” Kine said.

Earlier, HRW research also exposed the death squad-style extrajudicial executions by police and police agents.

Kine believes that the key to stop the abuse of human rights in the Philippines is an investigation by United Nations.

“Expect unlawful police abuses in the name of Duterte’s “war on drugs” to continue until the United Nations establishes an urgently needed independent, international investigation into the killings—and the secret jails that are part of it,” Kine said.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/04/28/1694768/hidden-jail-seen-sign-pnps-abuse-drug-war

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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image may contain: text

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Center for International Law Petitions Philippine Supreme Court To Stop Drug-Related Killings Of The Duterte Administration’s “War on Drugs”

April 26, 2017
Today, any Filipino can be denied of all rights and marked for execution anytime and anywhere.
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/ 06:23 PM April 26, 2017
drug user drug war crime

This picture taken on January 18, 2017, shows policemen investigating a body of an alleged drug user on the ground after an unidentified gunmen shot him dead in Manila.
AFP FILE PHOTO

A nongovernment organization of lawyers on Wednesday urged the Supreme Court to issue a new protective writ that will look into the spate of drug-related killings amid the Duterte administration’s war on drugs.

In its 14-page letter petition, the Center for International Law asked the high court to create a Writ “Contra Homo Sacer,” which it said will allow a new mandatory inquest procedure to address the increasing extrajudicial killings from police or vigilante operations. The lawyers said the new writ will require the police to produce a full documentation of any operation, “from planning to its implementation and its aftermath.”

“This includes the mandatory submission of detailed reports, forensic evidence, autopsy reports and the like, that comply with international standards. Many of these documentary requirements, while already provided under existing rules of the Department of Justice and the Philippine National Police (PNP), are often ignored by authorities,” the Center said in a statement.

“Thus, to ensure full compliance by both public prosecutors and law enforcement agencies, the Center asked the High Court to incorporate them into an amendment to the Rules of Criminal Procedure or into a new class of protective writs similar to what it had earlier issued, namely the Writ of Amparo and the Writ of Habeas Data,” it added.

The lawyers said their petition aimed to prevent “drug suspects or any other criminal suspects from being treated as homo sacer and from being subject to banishment to the realm of uncertain fate.” Homo sacer, they said, was legal concept from ancient Roman law recently recovered by Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, which refers to a class of persons treated as outlaws and without any rights.

“We write to implore the Supreme Court to promulgate additional rules on criminal procedure to help prevent the disturbing emergence of a class of people who – harking back to ancient Roman times – are no more than homo sacer, or beings reduced to mere biological existence, denied of all rights, marked for execution anytime and anywhere,” the group said.

“The obligation of police officers to turn over records, documents, and all evidence in connection with the commission of a crime as they themselves allege, must be required all the more if the suspect ends up dead, either at the hands of police officers or unknown assailants,” it added.

The lawyers said the high tribunal may adopt international standards laid down by the UN Minnesota Protocol on the Effective Prevention and Investigation of Extra-Legal Killings, Arbitrary and Summary Executions, Enforced Disappearances and Torture in crafting the new writ.

The group earlier filed a Writ of Amparo petition for the family of four men allegedly killed by members of the Quezon City Police District in Payatas during an Oplan Tokhang operation.

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/892220/sc-urged-to-craft-new-protective-writ-against-drug-killings#ixzz4fMR6TzBo
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In The Philippines: What Is The Basis of The “War on Drugs?” What is The Strategy? What Are Our Objectives?

April 26, 2017

Philippine Daily Inquirer

Letter to the Editor

OPINION / LATEST OPINION
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A war that isn’t war
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/ 12:12 AM April 26, 2017

The Holy Week pause made me think some more of the sufferings and deaths in the “war on drugs” that has made the Philippines probably the world’s bloodiest, most ruthless and most frightening country that isn’t at war. And the more I thought of the man waging it, the more I was convinced of the following:

He hasn’t studied the drug problem to any appreciable depth. He has made it his principal focus, and yet he has never elaborated on it, never elucidated its extent or the damage he says it has caused. His statement that “drugs are destroying this country” appeals to the emotion, but where are the facts? My sense: That statement may be a little more than—or nothing but—post-truth.

The lone statistic he has given—“4 million addicts”—has never been substantiated and may be untrue. No validation has come from the Philippine National Police, the Department of the Interior and Local Government or the Department of Health. A valid number could be derived only by proper quantification, using verified full-country data. No such process has been reported, and maybe there hasn’t been one. If no quantification has been done, then where did the “4 million” figure come from? My guess: He made it up. It was one of the first of the false facts that have since
proliferated.

Given the above, what is the basis for the “war on drugs”? (How can it be a “war” when only one side is armed?) The destruction that we have seen—thousands of human lives obliterated and wasted—is the horrifying response to what ugly truth? Possible answer: No truth, just an impression in the mind of someone who isn’t in the habit of going in-depth about anything.

The darkest of horrors have come to us from a mere impression? Heaven have mercy!

For the sake of the victims and their families, I hope I’m wrong. It is very painful for anybody to have a loved one get murdered, but it would be absolutely unbearable to have a loved one get murdered for something of questionable basis.

ATIS ALTAMIRANO,
atisaltamirano77@gmail.com

Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/103478/war-isnt-war#ixzz4fMOBVjJh
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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image may contain: text

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Presidential Spokesman Calls 7,000 Extrajudicial Killings “Fake News” (It’s actually more like 9,000) — Further Erodes Credibility of Philippine Government, Philippine National Police (PNP)

April 21, 2017
Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella called reports on more than 7,000 extralegal killings “false news.” PCOO/King Rodriguez

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte’s spokesperson on Friday called reports of nearly 9,000 drug-related deaths “false news,” months after media organizations and international groups used the figure in their reports.

Ernesto Abella, the presidential spokesperson, said that the persistent reports of more 7,000 killed, which is now said to be nearly 9,000, was “false news” as the Philippine National Police (PNP) said that the figure was much lower.

“On the number of extrajudicial deaths, the persistent news reports of 7,000 killed, which is now being said to be close to 9,000, is false,” Abella said.

The president’s spokesperson said that based on official police data there were only 6,011 homicide cases being investigated. Of the figure, only 1,398 cases were found to be drug related, contrary to reports that 9,000 have already been killed in anti-illegal drugs operations, Abella said.

Abella, meanwhile, called on organizations which report on drug incidents to be fair and not to rush to judgment as he emphasized that people appreciated the changes being implemented by the administration and the way these were carried out.

“We ask to be understood not just from a single perspective, but from the point of view of Filipinos who desire change, stability and fairness,” Abella said.

The number of murders and homicide cases, however, have risen dramatically at the start of the Duterte administration last year despite government’s denial that they are related to the brutal war on drugs. Drug experts also acknowledge that stringent law enforcement policy against narcotics have historically resulted in unnecessary violence and deaths.

Abella’s comments came days after a Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed that public satisfaction with the government’s conduct of the war on drugs plunging by 11 points, from +77 in December 2016 to +66 in March 2017.

He also assuaged American concern on the increasing extrajudicial killings in the Philippines, saying that those who breached protocol would be made to account.

“We share the concern of US Assistant Secretary of State for Southeast Asia Patrick Murphy, who has been quoted in the media saying ‘there are elements of the drug war that are operating outside the rule of law,’” the spokesperson said.

Abella said that the PNP has an Internal Affairs Service which would probe into cases of police violations.

“This body can suspend or dismiss PNP personnel based on violations incurred and can recommend the filing of criminal charges,” he said.

He said that security forces followed procedures in conducting their operations although force may be used to protect the safety of the police.

“Local authorities follow operation protocols and the proper enforcement of our laws requires the use of reasonable force merited by the attendant circumstances,” he said.

Not a single cop, however, has been accused by police investigators before a court of unjustifiably killing drug suspects in police operations. President Rodrigo Duterte himself said he will defend and pardon cops accused of wrongdoing in the field.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/04/21/1692511/abella-calls-7000-extrajudicial-killings-fake-news

Related:

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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image may contain: text

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

 

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
.

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

 

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Lawmaker Says Philippine National Police Must Legally Deal With Drug Problem Or Lose Public Support — Disgraceful practice of offering cash payments to police officers for killing drug suspects discussed

April 19, 2017

The body of drug suspect Jayson Reuyan lies on BAC-11 Street near the Parañaque River in Pasay City after he was killed in a police buy-bust operation on Jan. 13. (Photo by RICHARD A. REYES/Philippine Daily Inquirer)

The body of drug suspect Jayson Reuyan lies on BAC-11 Street near the Parañaque River in Pasay City after he was killed in a police buy-bust operation on Jan. 13. (Photo by RICHARD A. REYES/Philippine Daily Inquirer)

Sen. Panfilo Lacson on Wednesday said the authorities should change tactics in dealing with the narcotics problem as President Duterte’s brutal war on drugs began to lose public

“I think the tactics employed are starting to reach saturation point as far as the public is concerned. While the overall strategy is still effective, I think it’s time the (Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency) and the Philippine National Police [made] some adjustments to their tactical offensive,” Lacson said in a statement.

The latest Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed that public satisfaction with Mr. Duterte’s crackdown on illegal drugs fell to +66 percent in the first quarter of 2017 from +77 percent in December last year.

Fear of being killed

A majority of the respondents said they were worried that they or someone they knew would be victims of extrajudicial killings.

Lacson said people had grown tired of reports about the summary executions of drug suspects.

For a change, police can start by solving vigilante killings in the war on drugs and arresting those responsible.

“The police must therefore show solutions of these DUIs (deaths under investigation) and arrests must be made in considerable degree,” he said.

The PNP, however, said it saw no need to rethink its approach to the campaign against illegal drugs.

Senior Supt. Dionardo Carlos said the drop in public support for the war on drugs in the SWS poll was a “challenge” for the police, but insisted there were no state-sponsored extrajudicial killings in the Philippines.

“What is there to rethink? The deaths constitute 0.2 percent of the [people] involved in drugs that we’ve encountered. The 95 percent, or 1.18 million, surrendered peacefully while the rest were arrested alive,” he said.

“We don’t want them ending up dead [but] we give priority to protecting the public and also to [protecting] the lives of our policemen,” he added.

They resisted arrest

The PNP insisted that drug suspects who were killed in police operations had resisted arrest, endangering the lives of law enforcers.

PNP records show that as of April 18, 2,710 drug suspects were killed in police antinarcotics operations.

Carlos said he agreed with Lacson that police should arrest those behind the killings, but disagreed that the killings were extrajudicial.

He said that under former President Benigno Aquino III’s Administrative Order 35, extrajudicial killings refer only to the killings of journalists, activists and human rights defenders.

“This has to be explained, because if we keep on using the term [extrajudicial killing], then all murders and homicides that we’ve monitored would appear [to be extrajudicial killings],” he said.

Sen. Risa Hontiveros said the increasing body count had led to the drop in public approval of Mr. Duterte’s war on drugs.

‘National nightmare’

She said the campaign had turned into a “national nightmare” and it would continue to lose public support as long as it continued to “create a climate of fear and impunity.”

Sen. Joel Villanueva said the Duterte administration would “not get a passing grade” until it solved the vigilante killings.

There have been more than 3,700 alleged vigilante killings—the PNP calls them deaths under investigation—in the war on drugs as of March 24.

A new Reuters report on the killings quoted two senior police officers as saying police had carried out most of the killings and they had received cash payments for executing drug suspects and planted evidence at crime scenes.

According to the report, the cash rewards for drug killings range from P20,000 for a “street level pusher and user,” to P50,000 for a member of a barangay council, P1 million for “distributors, retailers and wholesalers,” and P5 million for “drug lords.”

Carlos denied the report, saying the PNP did not have enough money to offer cash payments to officers for killing drug suspects.

Nevertheless, the PNP is investigating the “serious” allegations in the report, he said.

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/890457/lacson-dares-pnp-solve-drug-killings

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/890457/lacson-dares-pnp-solve-drug-killings#ixzz4eiVECYVb
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 (Contains links to related articles)
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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.

Philippines: Leadership plays down reduced public support for war on drugs killings

April 19, 2017

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Presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella said majority of Filipinos are still satisfied with the government’s war on drugs despite the slight dip in satisfaction ratings. King Rodriguez/Presidential Photo, File

MANILA, Philippines — Presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella on Wednesday said majority of Filipinos are still satisfied with the government’s war against illegal drugs despite the dip in ratings.

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Abella noted that satisfaction is still high despite the “negative criticisms” received by the administration locally and abroad.
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“Filipinos understand and support the campaign against hard drug traffickers and violators,” he said.
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The spokesman also echoed the president’s vow and said that the drive against illegal drugs would be “relentless” until the drug apparatus is rendered useless.
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The latest survey conducted by the Social Weather Stations (SWS) from March 25 to 28 showed that 78 percent of Filipino adults are satisfied with the government’s war on drugs while 12 percent are dissatisfied, yielding a net satisfaction of +66. This is an 11-point dip from the +77 rating in December 2016.
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Meanwhile, 10 percent of Filipino adults are undecided.
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Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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He also noted that 70 percent of the Filipinos believe that the administration is serious about solving the problems in extrajudicial killings and cleansing the Philippine National Police of scalawags.
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The survey showed, however, that 36 percent of respondents said they think the Duterte administration is somewhat serious in solving extrajudicial killing cases, while 5 percent said the government is “somewhat not serious,” and 4 percent said it is not serious at all.
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The survey used face-to-face interviews with 1,200 adults nationwide and has a sampling error of ± 3 percent.
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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Philippines: Catholic Church will participate in the establishment of community-based rehabilitation centers for drug users in at least 20 parishes in Metro Manila.

April 18, 2017
/ 05:20 PM April 18, 2017
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Despite the rocky relationship between President Duterte and the Catholic Church, the religious sector and some government institutions will work together “to win the war against illegal drugs.”

The Catholic Church and concerned government agencies are set to discuss on Wednesday how to speed up the establishment of community-based rehabilitation centers for drug users in at least 20 parishes in Metro Manila.

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo and members of some laity organizations will meet with representatives from different government agencies at the Pope Pius XII Catholic Center in Manila, according to Interior Assistant Secretary Epimaco Densing III.

Image result for Bishop Broderick Pabillo, photos

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo

The government agencies joining the meeting are the Department of the Interior and Local Government, Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (Tesda), Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), Philippine National Police (PNP), and the Department of Health (DOH).

“We will be meeting so that we can discuss the community-based rehab centers that we will put up immediately. This is ASAP,” Densing said in an ambush interview on Tuesday.

The target is to have rehabilitation centers in at least 20 parishes  which can accommodate drug abusers from around 80 to 90 barangays, said Densing.

The community centers are included in the “out-patient component” of the government’s drug rehabilitation efforts as it will mostly admit the “experimenters” or those who use drugs once a week or once a month.

Asked about the funding, Densing said parishes will help raise the money to support the community-based centers, aside from the government budget that was allotted for the barangay anti-drug abuse councils (Badac).

“Once we’ve established the community-based rehab centers, we might require the barangays to put in some of their Badac budgets to support the community-based rehab centers. So it’s both a government and non-government (effort),” he said.

Densing said parishes will provide personnel to run the center while the government will provide supplemental needs like skills training care of Tesda, classification of drug surrenderers by the DOH, after-care program from the DSWD while the DILG and local government units will provide additional support.

As for the patients, the assistant secretary said they will get the list of “Tokhang” surrenderers from the PNP and the barangays.

“Hindi pa pinag-uusapan (We have not discussed it) in detail, but definitely there will [be] a strategy to ask the surrenderer to undertake the community rehab center,” he said.

If the program becomes successful, Densing hopes that other faith-based organizations can follow suit all over the country.

“That’s why we’re expediting this. We’re taking away all the red tape in organizing. When we met with Bishop Pabillo, the first thing I told them was to forget about all the paperwork. Let’s just put this into a running program and then maybe later on the paperwork will follow,” he said.

“Kung ito kasama natin ang simbahan, ang private sector at LGUs (If the church, the private sector and LGUs are on our side), I’m quite sure we will [win] the war against drugs,” Densing added./ac /rga

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ASEAN Meets In Philippines Despite Recent Gunbattle With Terrorists — Bohol, crossroads of tourism, terrorists, diplomats

April 18, 2017
A guard patrols the premises of the Department of Foreign Affairs in Pasay City yesterday. AP

MANILA, Philippines – A senior officials meeting of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in Bohol will push through as scheduled this week despite concerns over the recent bloody encounter between security forces and Abu Sayyaf militants in a remote town in the province.

The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), through acting spokesman Robespierre Bolivar, said international delegates have confirmed participation in the meeting in Bohol hosted by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI).

As this developed, tourism remains vibrant in Bohol despite last week’s violence, Gov. Edgardo Chatto said yesterday.

“We can confirm that the ASEAN meeting in Bohol will push through as scheduled, unless any new information dictates otherwise,” Bolivar said.

Bohol is hosting the 10th ASEAN and Hong Kong Free Trade Agreement (AHKFTA) Trade Negotiating Committee and Related Meetings.

The DTI-sponsored ministerial meetings will be held at the Henann Resort in Panglao Island beginning tomorrow until April 22.

The “security committee of our national organizing council is continuously working to ensure the safety and security of the meeting,” Bolivar said.

Manila will play host to the 30th ASEAN Summit on April 26 to 29. The summit proper will be held on the last day at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC).

The Philippines chairs the ASEAN Summit 2017 and will also host the 31st ASEAN Summit on Nov. 10-14 in Clark, Pampanga. The country’s chairmanship coincides with 50th anniversary of the 10-nation bloc.

Meanwhile, Chatto said tourists were largely undisturbed by the recent clashes between troops and Abu Sayyaf militants, judging from the surge of visitors to the province during Holy Week.

“It’s normal here during the Holy Week. All the hotel rooms were almost filled up. From about 80, 90 to 100 percent occupancy in resorts – nothing has changed,” said Chatto in an interview over radio dzMM.

On April 11, security forces acting on intelligence information pounced on Abu Sayyaf militants on three boats led by Abu Rami in Inabanga town. The clashes left three soldiers and a policeman killed.

The militants were believed to be plotting another kidnapping.

Chief Supt. Dionardo Carlos, spokesman for the Philippine National Police (PNP), said police forces in Central Mindanao have beefed up patrol and intelligence-monitoring in the region to stave off terror attacks and kidnapping.

Carlos said coordination among local government units, police and military forces has been intensified to prevent another attempt by the bandits to cross the seas to the Visayas.

“We are continuously guarding these areas. There is a regular monitoring in these areas,” he said.

As part of security measures, Carlos said several police teams visited Siquijor and Negros Oriental – particularly the coastal areas – to encourage residents to inform authorities of the arrival or activities of suspicious-looking men.

Residents spotted and reported the arrival in Bohol of armed men who stayed in the house of one of the local residents married to a woman from Mindanao.

Bohol, popular among local and foreign tourists, is home to the Chocolate Hills, the Danao Adventure Park, a tarsier conservation area and white sand beaches.

The province is not far from other tourist destinations like Cebu.

Chatto admitted some areas in Bohol remain on heightened alert as authorities are still on the hunt for suspected Abu Sayyaf fighters who managed to flee after the April 11 encounter.

Carlos said the Philippine Coast Guard and the Philippine Air Force have also been tapped to help secure the coastlines of Central Visayas and Negros Island regions.

“It was also announced that air assets of the Philippine Air Force will be flying over these islands to secure the coastlines and monitor the movement of small sea craft,” said Carlos. “There’s a joint task force in Negros Occidental with the Armed Forces of the Philippines, even local groups such as Bantay-Dagat in Negros were tapped in this effort.” –  Cecille Suerte Felipe

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/04/18/1691401/asean-meeting-push-through-bohol-week

Philippines: 39 dead in Holy Week drug war

April 17, 2017
At least 39 people were killed in police operations during Holy Week as Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa proved true to his word that there would be no Lenten break in the war on drugs. AP/Bullit Marquez, file

MANILA, Philippines – At least 39 people were killed in police operations during Holy Week as Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa proved true to his word that there would be no Lenten break in the war on drugs.

The PNP National Monitoring Center reported a total of 131 persons killed during operations against illegal drugs from March 1 to April 16 or in the last 47 days.

Of that number, 39 were killed in the government campaign in the last nine days or from April 7 to 16. This brought the average to four deaths daily.

In the report, 92 people were killed – an average of 2.4 individuals per day – since the PNP conducted Oplan Double Barrel Reloaded from March 1 to April 7.

Although the Roman Catholic church started observing the Holy Week on April 9, Palm Sunday, Dela Rosa warned drug pushers and addicts that the war against illegal drugs would continue.

“No, it won’t stop. Continuous, no letup,” said Dela Rosa, who was quick to clarify that he neither encourages nor discourages any police officer who chooses to do certain Catholic practices, like carrying the cross or performing similar acts of penitence, which he considers a “personal vocation according to their own volition.”

“If they want to do it, go ahead,” the police chief said.

Of the 131 drug personalities killed, 44 were from Central Luzon; 24, National Capital Region (NCR); 17, Southern Tagalog; 8, Central Visayas; 6, Western Mindanao; 5, Eastern Visayas; 5, Central Mindanao; and 4, Bicol.

The regions of Western Visayas, Northern Mindanao, Southern Mindanao, Caraga and Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) each had three people killed while the Ilocos, Cagayan Valley and Negros have one each.

Under Oplan High-Value Target Revalidated, police operatives conducted 6,025 operations and arrested a total of 9,692 drug personalities. Most of them were from NCR (2,122) and Southern Tagalog (2,089).

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/04/17/1691058/39-dead-holy-week-drug-war

Philippines: A Businessman’s Murder Unmasks a Web of Violent Police

April 14, 2017

The abduction and killing of an innocent South Korean executive in the Philippines has blossomed into a national scandal amid President Duterte’s war on drugs

Jee Ick-joo, a South Korean businessman in the Philippines, was abducted by police from his home in October. It took his wife, Choi Kyung-jin, three months to learn his fate. Video: Eva Tam; photo: Jes Aznar for The Wall Street Journal

April 14, 2017 10:27 a.m. ET

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ANGELES CITY, Philippines—Around lunchtime on Oct. 18, several men entered Jee Ick-joo’s home, bundled the South Korean businessman into his black Ford Explorer and drove off.

Nearly two weeks later, his wife began receiving text messages demanding five million pesos—around $100,000—for his release. “Do not ask the police or someone bcuz we know what u do,” one message said.

In mid-January, the National Bureau of Investigation discovered that Mr. Jee was dead. Investigators said they traced his remains to a funeral parlor owned by a retired policeman who had been contracted by police antinarcotics agents to dispose of his body. It had flushed Mr. Jee’s ashes down a toilet.

Jee Ick-joo, a South Korean businessman in the Philippines, was abducted by police from his home in October. It took his wife, Choi Kyung-jin, three months to learn his fate. Video: Eva Tam; photo: Jes Aznar for The Wall Street Journal

Of all the 8,000-plus killings that have taken place since Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte declared a bloody war on drugs here last year, it is the abduction and killing of Mr. Jee, who was 53 years old, that has raised some of the most troubling questions. Investigators have said he had no known ties to drugs.

Civil-rights campaigners say police are killing people without due process in what amounts to an extrajudicial execution campaign. Sometimes, they say, police are using Mr. Duterte’s war on cheap methamphetamine as cover for kidnapping and extorting people such as Mr. Jee.

The mayhem has drawn criticism from around the world. Mr. Jee’s death has transfixed the nation and sparked calls from South Korea’s government to bring those responsible to justice. The Joint Foreign Chambers of Commerce in the Philippines, including those of the U.S. and European Union, have demanded a full investigation.

The Philippines police say they are enforcing the law and that if any abuses occur, offending officers will be punished. Several have admitted, in sworn statements, involvement in Mr. Jee’s abduction and have been detained pending further investigation, though none have confessed to the killing and no clear reason has emerged for it. The first court hearing about his death is scheduled to take place Wednesday in Angeles City.

Mr. Jee, a man of medium build whose thick black hair was starting to gray, was a successful businessman who friends and family say tried to keep a low profile.

He had worked in Europe and elsewhere before moving to the Philippines in 2007 as a manager with Hanjin Heavy Industries & Construction Co. Ltd., which ran a shipbuilding operation at former U.S. naval base Subic Bay.

He and his wife, Choi Kyung-jin, had begun thinking about retirement, and thought the Philippines looked like a good place to settle down, Ms. Choi said in an interview. Mr. Jee opened a staff-recruitment business for factories around Angeles City, about 50 miles north of Manila. They moved there with their daughter in 2012 and found a growing community of South Korean expatriates drawn by the sun and slower pace of life.

Choi Kyung-jin, Mr. Jee’s wife, found the door open and rooms ransacked when she returned home on the afternoon of Oct. 18.
Choi Kyung-jin, Mr. Jee’s wife, found the door open and rooms ransacked when she returned home on the afternoon of Oct. 18. PHOTO: JES AZNAR FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
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Ms. Choi says her husband enjoyed golf, wines and science-fiction movies. He saved on his phone a song list for office karaoke outings—a favorite was Elvis Presley’s “Hound Dog.” He was a talkative man. “I used to joke that my husband was silent only when he was asleep,” she says.

On the morning of Oct. 18, she got a text message from her husband asking about lunch. He often ate at home. She had plans to visit a sauna but said she would leave something for him.

When Ms. Choi returned at 5 p.m., she recalls, she found the door open and no one home. Upstairs rooms had been ransacked.

The couple’s housekeeper, Marisa Morquicho, later told authorities that two men identifying themselves as police entered the house and said they were looking for drugs. Among them was a paunchy officer with short dark hair whom she later identified as Ricky Santa Isabel. Police brought Officer Santa Isabel in for questioning after security cameras captured his wife’s car in front of Mr. Jee’s house that day.

Neighbors told Ms. Choi and investigators they had noticed a struggle when several men pushed Mr. Jee into his SUV. Ms. Morquicho also was taken to the vehicle, where she saw Mr. Jee sandwiched between two men on the rear seat. She said the men instructed her to wrap a shirt around her head as a blindfold. Then they drove to Manila.

The couple’s housekeeper, Marisa Morquicho, who also was abducted briefly, appeared with her face covered at a Senate hearing in January.
The couple’s housekeeper, Marisa Morquicho, who also was abducted briefly, appeared with her face covered at a Senate hearing in January. PHOTO: TED ALJIBE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
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When they got there, Ms. Morquicho was put into a different vehicle and taken to another location, where some men gave her money and told her to get out at a bus station, wait 10 seconds, then remove her blindfold, she said. She counted to 10. Then they were gone.

One man who later admitted to being in the Ford Explorer, police officer Roy Villegas, told investigators they took Mr. Jee to police headquarters, Camp Crame.

Another man who said he accompanied the officers, civilian Jerry Omlang, told police in a sworn statement that Mr. Jee pleaded to be let go and offered four million pesos, or about $80,000, for his freedom.

Mr. Jee was killed just before 10 p.m., witnesses said. Accounts of how it happened differ.

Officer Villegas told investigators that Officer Santa Isabel got some tape and surgical gloves and told him to wrap the tape around Mr. Jee’s head. Until that point, Officer Villegas said, he believed he was on a legitimate antidrug operation. Now he feared for his life and smothered Mr. Jee as instructed while Officer Santa Isabel killed Mr. Jee by strangling him, Officer Villegas said.

The accused

Police officer Ricky Santa Isabel

Police officer Roy Villegas

Jerry Omlang
PHOTOS: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES; ASSOCIATED PRESS(2)
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In an affidavit, Officer Santa Isabel denied killing Mr. Jee or being present at the kidnapping. He said he was at Camp Crame and saw another officer hitting Mr. Jee with a pistol, and helped dispose of the body on orders from his superiors.

Mr. Omlang, the civilian, who once was an informer for the National Bureau of Investigation, said in his police statement he was at the kidnapping and that Officers Villegas and Santa Isabel were there, too. He said he got out of the SUV before Camp Crame to draw money from an ATM with Mr. Jee’s card.

Efforts to reach Officer Villegas and Mr. Omlang, who are in government custody, and their lawyers were unsuccessful. In a brief interview during an investigatory panel at the Department of Justice in February, Officer Santa Isabel, who also has been detained, said other police were to blame for Mr. Jee’s death.

On the night of the killing, Mr. Jee’s body was dropped off at a funeral parlor owned by retired policeman Gerardo Santiago.  He told investigators Officer Santa Isabel had asked him if he could get rid of a body. He said he assumed whoever it was had been killed in an antidrug operation.

Officer Villegas said Mr. Santiago was paid the equivalent of a few hundred dollars and given a set of golf clubs from the back of Mr. Jee’s car. Mr. Santiago said in an affidavit he took some money, but denied getting the clubs.

Funeral-home staffers told police they prepared Mr. Jee’s body for cremation under a false name and with a faked death certificate. Teodolito Tarepe, the embalmer, said in a sworn statement he found strangulation marks on the neck and said the wrists appeared to have been tied. “The front of his pants were wet, as if he had urinated himself,” he said.

The place in Manila where Mr. Jee allegedly was killed, as seen in February.
The place in Manila where Mr. Jee allegedly was killed, as seen in February. PHOTO: ERIK DE CASTRO/REUTERS
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Back in Angeles City, Ms. Choi says, she tried texting and calling her husband, but he didn’t respond. She called his driver, and together they searched for Mr. Jee’s car until 1 a.m.

The next day, she called the police, but they weren’t much help. As it became more evident her husband had been abducted, she started looking through evidence herself, including neighborhood security-camera footage that showed a Toyota Hilux pickup. It was later identified as belonging to Ricky Santa Isabel’s wife.

Ms. Choi found out from her husband’s bank branches that his cards had been used to withdraw cash. She began packing Mr. Jee’s clothes into zip-lock bags so they could depart quickly for South Korea if he returned.

“It was OK if he came back crippled, as long as he came back,” Ms. Choi says.

On Oct. 30, still unaware of her husband’s fate, Ms. Choi received a late-night text message from an anonymous sender asking for five million pesos, or about $100,000, by 6 p.m. the following day, along with the warning not to contact the police.

Ms. Choi’s cellphone showing text messages she sent to her husband's abductors.
Ms. Choi’s cellphone showing text messages she sent to her husband’s abductors. PHOTO: JES AZNAR FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
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The sender said nothing further. Ms. Choi began calling friends and family to raise the money. She decided not to alert police, but wrote down the serial numbers of the bank notes in case they might be useful later.

A message the next day from a different number instructed her to go to a supermarket near a Jollibee fast-food restaurant in Angeles City. She was to park her Honda Civic in front of the store with the engine running, leave the cash inside and wait in the restaurant, with an obscured view of the parking lot.

“Now move hurry and don’t try anwting ok,” another message said.

Ms. Choi arrived, with some friends watching from a distance, and waited inside the hamburger joint. After half an hour, she sent a message asking if she could return to her car. When she didn’t get a reply, she walked back. The bag with the cash was empty.

Half an hour later, a text message arrived telling her not to worry and promising to be in touch.

Another message two days later asked for 4.5 million pesos more. This time, Ms. Choi didn’t have the means to pull together the cash.

She couldn’t respond immediately because of a cellular-network outage. When service was restored, she found a message warning her she was “playing” with Mr. Jee’s life. When she texted back, no one answered.

The site in Angeles City where Ms. Choi left a bag of ransom cash.
The site in Angeles City where Ms. Choi left a bag of ransom cash. PHOTO: JES AZNAR FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
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In mid-January, an intermediary summoned Ms. Choi to the office of a private detective she had hired. He told her Mr. Jee was dead, without explaining how he knew. She broke down, and to this day can’t remember how she got home afterward.

A couple of days later, the National Bureau of Investigation called Ms. Choi into its offices to tell her that her husband’s body had been cremated and its remains flushed away. Other investigators asked her to identify Mr. Jee’s golf clubs, found at the crematorium.

On Jan. 20, the Philippines Department of Justice accused several policemen, including Officers Santa Isabel and Villegas, of kidnapping for ransom, with homicide. The case became a national sensation. National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa told reporters he was “deeply offended” and sorry that “my people” were involved in Mr. Jee’s homicide. “If I had my way, I will kill the policemen involved,” he said.

President Duterte also apologized. “Police, you sons of bitches, I won’t let you get away with it. You will suffer,” he said in a speech.

He suspended his antidrug campaign and ordered police to clean up their act, but vowed to get tough again a few weeks later, when authorities launched a new phase of the drug war, dubbed Operation Double Barrel: Reloaded.

Officer Santa Isabel said he was pressured into taking the fall for the killing by his commanding officer, Superintendent Rafael Dumlao. Mr. Dumlao has denied wrongdoing and in a sworn statement implicated Officer Santa Isabel.

The streets near Mr Jee’s home, where his wife searched for him after he went missing.
The streets near Mr Jee’s home, where his wife searched for him after he went missing. PHOTO: JES AZNAR FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
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Last month, a Philippines lawmaker filed an impeachment complaint against Mr. Duterte, saying he was unfit for office, partly because of the drug war. Catholic Church leaders have criticized the drug campaign. Human Rights Watch cited Mr. Jee’s case in calling for a United Nations inquiry last month.

At the end of January, Ms. Choi says, Gen. Dela Rosa, the police chief, asked her if her husband or his company had links to casinos or drugs. She said they didn’t. He didn’t even like taking medicine when sick. She says Gen. Dela Rosa told her not to read anything into his questions.

Some police officials and lawmakers, including Senator Panfilo Lacson, a former police chief, have said they worry the contradictory accounts of what happened on Oct. 18 might undermine prospects of ever convicting anyone for Mr. Jee’s death.

Ms. Choi has tried to move on. At a memorial service on the outskirts of Seoul in February, she laid out her husband’s favorite blue shoes and the clothes she saved in zip-lock bags on firewood and set them ablaze as part of a Buddhist ritual for the dead.

A week later, she visited their Angeles City home again. She had moved to a more secure location after the killing. She stared blankly into her old living room.

“He only visited me in my dreams once,” she said after leaving. “I’m a bit hurt he didn’t visit more often.”

Ms. Choi returned in March to the home she once shared with her husband.
Ms. Choi returned in March to the home she once shared with her husband. PHOTO: JES AZNAR FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
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Write to Eun-Young Jeong at Eun-Young.Jeong@wsj.com and James Hookway at james.hookway@wsj.com

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-businessmans-murder-in-the-philippines-unmasks-a-web-of-violent-police-1492180075

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kline also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

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Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl looks like it has been put out with the trash…..
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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

 

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High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

 

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP