Posts Tagged ‘President Duterte’

After Philippine Police Kill 32 Drug Suspects in One Day; President Duterte Urges Them To Kill 32 More The Next Day

August 16, 2017
Duterte yesterday said authorities should kill more pushers to reduce the drug problem plaguing the country. PPD/File

MANILA, Philippines –  President Duterte welcomed the killing of 32 drug suspects in simultaneous raids in Bulacan last Tuesday and defended policemen from critics who questioned the way the operations were conducted.

Duterte yesterday said authorities should kill more pushers to reduce the drug problem plaguing the country.

“Yung namatay daw sa Bulacan, 32 (Thirty-two people reportedly died in Bulacan) in a massive raid. Maganda yun (That’s good),” the President said at the 19th anniversary of the Volunteers Against Crime and Corruption at Malacañang.

“Pumatay tayo (Let’s kill) another 32 everyday, maybe we can reduce what ails this country,” he added.

Thirty-two suspected drug offenders died and 107 others were nabbed during simultaneous law enforcement operations, which began last Monday in the province. Police recovered illegal drugs, grenades and firearms during the raids.

The President said he is expecting human rights advocates to criticize the law enforcement operations.

“There will be outcry again over the 32 who were killed. They would grieve again for justice,” he said.

“Many are being killed because policemen are working. They are protected under my watch.”

Duterte said he has ordered security forces to destroy the apparatus of the drug trade, which he said is “taking a toll on the lives of the people.”

“My order is to destroy the apparatus. Kung napatay ka, pasensya ka (If you get killed, sorry). We will finish this for the next generation,” he said.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/17/1729961/rody-bulacan-drug-deaths-kill-32-more-daily

*******************************************************

Duterte says drug problem can’t be solved in just one term

President Rodrigo Duterte vowed during the campaign period that he can fix the country from illegal drugs in three to six months. File photo

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte admitted that the country’s illegal drugs problem is so severe that a six-year term for a president is not enough to solve it.

“Look itong shabu, ang drugs, etc., cannot be solved by one man, for a president for one term,” Duterte said in his speech at the Philippine Development Forum: Sulong Pilipinas 2017 forum last Wednesday.

“It has bugged nations, hindi nga kaya ng Amerika, tayo pa,” he added.

READ: Duterte vows to keep drug war amid human rights concerns

 

During the campaign period, Duterte vowed to solve the problem in three to six months.

Three months after assuming presidency in July, the president asked for an extension of another six months.

READ: Rights groups want tougher stance on Duterte’s drug war from Trump

http://www.philstar.com/news-videos/2017/08/11/1727928/watch-duterte-says-drug-problem-cant-be-solved-just-one-term

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
.
Related:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

.

Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
.

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Amnesty: Indonesia waging its own ‘war on drugs’

August 16, 2017

Police killings of suspected drug dealers have spiked, with 60 recorded deaths so far this year compared to 18 in 2016. The trend has led Amnesty International to warn that the country could be emulating the Philippines.

Indonesien Beschlagnahmte Drogen nach einer Razzia (Getty Images/AFP/Ricardo)

The dramatic spike in the number of unlawful killings carried out by Indonesian police against suspected drug dealers is the latest signal that the country could be sliding into a “war on drugs” similar to that seen in the Philippines, rights group Amnesty International warned on Wednesday.

Data obtained by the group showed a more than 200-percent rise in drug-related killings carried out by Indonesian police so far this year, with the number of deaths rising up to 60 from just 18 last year.

Read more: Why Jakarta presses forward with drug executions despite global outcry

Amnesty’s director in Indonesia, Usman Hamid, said in a statement: “This shocking escalation in unlawful killings by the police sounds serious alarm bells. While Indonesian authorities have a duty to respond to increasing rates of drug use in the country, shooting people on sight is never a solution. Not only is it unlawful, it will also do nothing to address the root causes that lead to drug use in the first place.”

Most of the violence has been concentrated around the capital city of Jakarta or the well-known drug trafficking hub of Sumatra.

Indonesia officials back tough stance

Indonesian police forces have justified the increase in killings, saying victims were shot for resisting arrest. However, Amnesty said it found no evidence that authorities had conducted even a single independent investigation into the shootings.

That data also reflects the Indonesian government’s increasingly tough rhetoric on drug-related crime, with President “Jokowi” Widodo openly endorsing the use of unrestrained force against suspected foreign traffickers, especially those resisting arrest. “Be firm, especially to foreign drug dealers who enter the country and resist arrest,” he said at a speech in Jakarta in late July. “Enough, just shoot them. Be merciless.”

Indonesia Joko Widodo (Reuters/Beawiharta)Indonesia’s Joko Widodo has endorsed the use of force in policing drug-related crimes

Police chief hails Duterte’s “war on drugs”

The president’s remarks came after the country’s national police chief, General Tito Karnavian, ordered officers “not to hesitate shooting drug dealers who resist arrest” and praised Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s brutal “war on drugs” as an effective means of making drug dealers “go away.”

Since coming to power in May last year, Duterte has waged a brutal war on drugs in a bid to wipe out the use of narcotics in the Philippines. According to police data, some 3,500 so-called “drug personalities” have been killed by Duterte’s anti-drug squadsover the past year, as well as a further 2,000 people linked to drug-related crimes.

Read more: Alleged hitman links Duterte to ‘death squad’ killings

Earlier this year, Amnesty documented that anti-drug forces had grown to resemble a criminal enterprise more than a police force.

“President Duterte should not under any circumstances be considered a role model for Indonesia,” said Amnesty’s Hamid. “Far from making the Philippines safer, his bloody ‘war on drugs’ has led to the deaths of thousands without any form of accountability.”

http://www.dw.com/en/amnesty-indonesia-waging-its-own-war-on-drugs/a-40110231

dm/kms (AFP, Amnesty)

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
.
Related:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

.

Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
.

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippine mayor linked to drugs killed in raid, police say

July 30, 2017

AFP

© AFP | War on drugs in the Philippines

MANILA (AFP) – A Philippine mayor named as being involved in the narcotics trade was shot dead in a police raid Sunday, authorities said, the latest official to be killed since President Rodrigo Duterte launched a drug war.

Duterte has singled out local officials, policemen and judges as part of a crackdown that has made him popular with many Filipinos but has been condemned by human rights groups and other critics.

Among those Duterte named was Reynaldo Parojinog, mayor of Ozamiz city, who was killed along with 11 others in a dawn raid on his home, police said.

“Police were serving a search warrant when the security guards of the mayor fired at them so our policemen retaliated,” police regional spokesman Superintendent Lemuel Gonda told AFP.

Officers recovered grenades, ammunition as well as illegal drugs in the raid, according to police provincial chief Jaysen De Guzman.

Duterte won the presidency last year promising to kill tens of thousands of criminals to prevent the Philippines from becoming a narco-state.

Since he took office, police have reported killing nearly 3,200 people in the drug war.

More than 2,000 other people have been killed in drug-related crimes, according to police data.

Rights groups say many of those victims have been killed by vigilante death squads linked to the government, and that Duterte may be overseeing a crime against humanity.

In a speech last year, Duterte said Parojinog was among mayors involved in the illegal drug trade.

Police said Sunday they had conducted surveillance on Parojinog based on the president’s remarks.

“He has many security personnel who carry unlicensed firearms,” regional police chief Timoteo Pacleb told radio DZMM.

Two other mayors Duterte mentioned in his so-called “drug list” were killed last year.

In November, Rolando Espinosa, the mayor of Albuera town, was killed during a night-time raid in a provincial jail.

Duterte had defended the officers involved in the raid and ordered their reinstatement, with critics saying the decision would worsen the nation’s “culture of impunity”.

In October, Samsudin Dimaukom, the mayor of the southern town of Saudi Ampatuan, was killed in a shoot-out in a police checkpoint on suspicion he and his security personnel were transporting illegal drugs, authorities said.

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
.
Related:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

.

Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
.

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

In The Philippines, Fear Mounts That President Duterte Means What He Says — The Future Looks Dark

July 27, 2017
Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte addresses thousands of protesters following his state of the nation address outside the Lower House Monday, July 24, 2017 in Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez

The address of PRRD last Monday, July 24, 2017 is more about his plans and projects for the country than about the state of the nation, one year after he became president. It really sounds so hopeful but not as frank as his drumbeaters describes it. There are quite a number of contradictions that create doubt and confusion as to what he really intends to achieve during his term as President.

At the top of his agenda is still his war against drugs which he promised to be “unremitting and unrelenting.” He said he will not stop his daily crackdown on drugs and warned the drug addicts and drug lords that they only have two choices – jail or hell. Undoubtedly, he is really the only President who is so resolute and determined to lick this evil in our society that has caused so much harm especially to the youth of our land. His unrelenting and persistent fight against this problem that tends to destroy the “future generation of our country” is truly laudable and commendable. It shows his care and concern for our young people who are easy preys to this pernicious menace which has not been given the same kind of attention by past administrations.

Time and again however it has been pointed out that no matter how laudable is his purpose in waging this war he should employ justifiable and legal means to achieve it. Notable and alarming in this connection is the rise in the number of suspected drug addicts, dealers and pushers mostly belonging to the poor sector of our society who are killed during the one year period of his administration. These killings which are called Extra-Judicial Killings (EJKs), are mostly done by the members of the Philippine National Police (PNP) allegedly because the suspects resist arrest and/or assault them. So far no investigation has been conducted to find out if they are really done in self-defense or if there is reasonable necessity of the means employed to prevent or repel the unlawful aggression. On the contrary, it seems that our policemen are even encouraged to go on with such killings with a promise that they will be protected and or pardoned if charged and convicted. So, expect more of these EJKs in the coming years. In fact they have also proliferated into shooting to death done by unidentified motor-cyclers riding in tandem.

Undoubtedly, the value of human life has been seriously degraded under this administration. And it will further be belittled if PRRD will continue to ignore the age-old, time-tested principle observed by leaders worldwide which says that “the end does not justify the means”. The irony in this regard is that in his speech, PRRD has even said that; “I value human life, the very way I value mine.” And further adding to the confusion is the declaration in the same speech that he has asked Congress “to re-impose death penalty on heinous crimes.”

Another confusing and contradictory aspect in his address before Congress in joint session is the attack against the Supreme Court particularly on its alleged penchant in issuing Temporary Restraining Orders. He cited in this connection, the alleged TROs issued against the implementation of the Reproductive Health Law already passed by Congress. Apparently, he, or his advisers have misunderstood the ruling of the SC here. If they will carefully read the SC decision, no TRO has been issued here. The SC has simply clarified and defined the meaning of abortifacients. The court declared that the birth control pills and devices which primarily and secondarily prevent the implantation of fertilized ovum in the mothers’ womb cause abortion and are considered as abortifacients which are punishable under the Revised Penal Code. So the SC tasked the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to determine first which of these pills and devices are abortifacients before distributing them. Up to now however the FDA has not satisfactorily proven that the pills and devices procured by the government will not primarily or secondarily lead to abortion, thus disallowing their distribution. So it is the FDA which has actually prevented the implementation of the RH law, not the SC.

PRRD’s fears about the issuance of TROs against government projects are likewise unfounded. The SC or any court will not and cannot issue any such TRO because it is prohibited by law.

Another contradictory aspect in PRRD’s speech is on the promise of a comfortable life for our people. On the contrary however, regular surveys conducted by pollsters in this regard show that more and more of our countrymen are getting hungry everyday with no food on the table. The more accurate future state of our country in this regard is therefore, that the few rich and oligarchs are getting richer and poor are getting poorer and hungrier.

Ironically the tax reforms being pushed by the administration for raising more money supposedly to help the poor will not however produce such desired result. The poor may really have more money because of this tax reforms package. But the increase in taxes will also result in the increase in the prices of foods and other prime commodities. Hence even with more money to spend, they will also be dissipated in buying their basic needs and daily sustenance.

Coming to mind more vividly upon hearing or reading this “comfortable life” for our people are the numerous residents of Marawi City who have been evacuated and sheltered temporarily in provisional centers provided for them in another city without however the basic facilities. They have been dislodged from their residence for more than three months now and are longing to return home but are not allowed yet because there is still no end in sight to the ongoing hostilities against the rebellious terrorists who attacked the city.

Then in his ending plea, PRRD also asked for an end to corruption in government. It seems however that his plea falls on deaf ears as delay in the processing of papers in government offices persist due to red tape that grow longer and longer.

On the whole therefore, the future painted by PRRD in his SONA remains unclear and still looks dark.

* * *

Email: attyjosesison@gmail.com

http://www.philstar.com/opinion/2017/07/28/1722112/future-state-nation

Related:

Residents and police gather near the blanket-covered body of a man killed, along with four others, in an alleged police anti-drug operation in Manila, Philippines Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. Authorities said 3,200 alleged drug personalities have died in police operations from July 1, 2016 to June 20, 2017. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez

Opinion: Philippine President Duterte, in Annual State of The Nation, Did Everything Expected of a Mad Emperor

July 26, 2017
Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte addresses thousands of protesters following his state of the nation address outside the Lower House Monday, July 24, 2017 in Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. Thousands of protesters march towards the Lower House with an effigy of Duterte to demand that he deliver on a wide range of promises he made in his first state of the nation address last year, from pressing peace talks with Marxist guerrillas, which is currently on hold, to upholding human rights and the rule of law. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez
 / 05:10 AM July 26, 2017

One image kept recurring in the two-plus hours I spent watching and listening to the second State of the Nation Address of President Digong. And this was a scenario from a movie-in-my-mind born of watching moviesabout mad Roman Emperors.

The scenario involves any one of the many drunken, debauched orgies over which an Emperor like Nero or Caligula would preside. The toga-clad Emperor is perched on a lounger, surrounded by fawning acolytes while all around him Roman senators and officials are frolicking with nubile ladies. In the course of the festivities the Emperor would let go of one outrageous remark or the other, or else order his Praetorian Guard to usher in a hapless prisoner or citizen who for one reason or the other had earned the Emperor’s ire. The hapless subject is flogged, if not killed, outright, while everyone at the party laughs in amusement, cruelty and delight.

I’m sure the Emperor Caligula’s cohorts enthusiastically cheered him on when he lavished honors and luxuries on Incitatus, to whom he gave marble quarters, a jeweled collar and even a house. (There is even a rumor that Caligula married Incitatus.) All par for the course for a self-indulgent ruler, except for the fact that Incitatus was a horse!

Anyway, our dear leader, it seems to me, did everything expected of a mad Emperor during last Monday’s Sona. And if he chose to marry a horse in the course of proceedings, I’m sure the pro-Duterte crowd in and out of the Batasan would have unblinkingly cheered him on. After all, they had sat stoically through his long-winded address, peppered liberally with cuss words that had never, or very rarely, been heard in the august halls of Congress, and even applauded from time to time.

An alert netizen counted the times curse words emanated from the mouth of our fearless leader. He counted five p—– ina, one g–o, two son-of-a-b—h, one s—, one tarantado, one ’ny—, and one gunggong. Another observer said “leche” was also used, while the one word that still managed to shock the public, given how “used” we have become to the stream of garbage flowing out of the President’s mouth, was “lulo” a Visayan vulgarity meaning “masturbation.”

I leaned closer to the TV set whenever the cameras were directed towards the diplomats. US Ambassador Sung Kim kept a straight face through much of the President’s rants, until at one point he yanked out his ear phones. I was wondering if this was a sign of irritation until I realized Mr. Duterte had shifted to English, airing his demand that the States return the bells of Balangiga.

Being diplomats, the ambassadors present at the Sona managed to maintain neutral expressions throughout this two-hour rant. As a Filipino, I was chagrined, wondering what these ambassadors would be reporting to their home offices when they returned from the Batasan. I hope they see the President and his followers as just a portion (although quite substantial) of the populace. That not all of us are like that.

There was only one country towards which Mr. Duterte was reconciliatory, and that is of course the Philippines’ new BFF, China. Jim Paredes, never a friend of the administration, put it sardonically but perfectly: “The U.S. has our bells. China has his balls. Kawawang bayan! (Our poor country!)”

But there were parts of the Sona I did like. One was the aforementioned demand to return the bells of Balangiga. It’s about time, and the American government should start thinking whether the sentiments of a few veterans and soldiers and relatives of the troops who turned Samar into a “howling wilderness” is a fair counterbalance to the historical grievance of generations of Filipinos. We are, after all and despite what the President says, friends.

The other part was President Duterte’s calling out of Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno to lift the TRO on the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Law. Though I have misgivings about this violation of the principle of independence of the three co-equal branches of government, I do hope Sereno and the justices were not just listening but taking the “appeal” to heart.

Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/105846/like-mad-emperor#ixzz4nw5pqhLF
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Related:

Residents and police gather near the blanket-covered body of a man killed, along with four others, in an alleged police anti-drug operation in Manila, Philippines Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. Authorities said 3,200 alleged drug personalities have died in police operations from July 1, 2016 to June 20, 2017. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez
.

Human Rights Watch Hammers The Philippines on Police Reinstatements After Murders — HRW says the president’s statement encouraging the killing of drug suspects could be considered “criminal incitement,” police action could be  crimes against humanity.

July 14, 2017

 3  30 googleplus0  0

PNP-Crime Investigation and Detection Group of Region 8 headed by Superintendent Marvin Marcos faces Senate investigation in the killing of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa. STAR/Geremy Pintolo, File

MANILA, Philippines — A human rights watchdog on Friday blasted the reinstatement of police officers accused of involvement in the killing of a former Leyte mayor, saying that such move demonstrated a “kids-gloves” treatment of the cops as it reiterated its call for a United Nations-led probe into mounting killings in relation to the government’s drug war.

Human Rights Watch, a New York-based watchdog, said the “kid-gloves” handling of the officers was emblematic of the impunity given to those accused of killing more than 7,000 people, mostly from urban poor communities, in the government’s conduct of its war on drugs.

The government, however, contradicted this and released data last May showing a lower figure of nearly 4,600 drug-related killings. It added that many of the deaths cited by government critics were classified as still under investigation although up to now no update has been made on their status.

HRW has been critical of the President Rodrigo Duterte’s campaign against narcotics and in March released a report accusing the Philippine leader of inciting the killings of Filipinos accused of involvement in illegal drugs.

The group recently described Duterte’s first year in offices as a “human rights calamity” for the mounting drug war killings and the intimidation of his government’s critics.

On Wednesday, Duterte told the personnel of the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology that he had already ordered the return to service of Superintendent Marvin Marcos and his 18 men who were found to have been involved in the killing of former Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa and his cell mate Raul Yap last year by the Senate and National Bureau of Investigation.

Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

The president said that Marcos should be reactivated as he was not part of the raiding team and was far from the scene of the operations.

This generated a slew of strong reactions especially from senators who investigated the deaths last year.

Sen. Panfilo Lacson, head of the one of the two Senate committees that probed into the incident, could not hide his disgust and spewed an invective to show his frustration with the president’s move.

“In sum, there is a phrase to describe this whole damn thing: Put*ng I*a!” Lacson said.

The return to service of the police personnel followed the downgrade of cases of these cops from murder to homicide.

HRW said that the return to service of the cops was not surprising considering that Duterte vowed in the past that he would even pardon, reinstate and promote them.

“They can call me and say they have been convicted, and I’ll tell the judge to pardon them all,” Duterte was quoted by HRW as saying.

He repeated this promise on Wednesday when he again offered a vigorous defense of security officials involved in the killings. He said that they should not be prosecuted for following his orders.

“Sabi ko, ‘Wala akong pakialam dyan. File na ninyo lahat ng gusto ninyong file.’ Pero sabi ko and in front of Cabinet, ‘I will never allow a military man, a government man or a policeman na makukulong for doing his duty and obeying my order,” the president said, to the applause of most of the members of the audience.

The group debunked the usual police refrain that suspects killed either resisted arrest or were targeted by “unknown gunmen.”

These drug war deaths demand accountability through an investigation of a UN-led panel, the group said.

“Until that occurs, police and their agents implicated in those killings will continue to get away with murder,” the watchdog said.

READ: UN official seeks protection for Callamard amid threats

Based on HRW research, the deaths of suspected drug users and dealers, which Duterte had used to brand his campaign a success, were due to unlawful police conduct which was designed to lend legality to extrajudicial killings which “may amount to crimes against humanity.”

HRW said that the president’s past statement encouraging the killing of drug suspects could be considered “criminal incitement,” warning him and senior government figures that they could be charged with crimes against humanity.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/07/14/1719536/hrw-blasts-reinstatement-marcos-other-cops-espinosa-slay

Related:

Photo taken in November last year shows Supt. Marvin Marcos attending a hearing of the Senate committee on justice and human rights. GEREMY PINTOLO
.

.
.
.
.
.
.

Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

.

Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
.

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Senator Calls Head of the Philippine National Police a “Slacker”

July 13, 2017
 Gordon calls PNP chief ‘Bato-gan’ for not addressing ‘riding-in-tandem’ slays
.
 / 07:45 PM July 13, 2017
.
Image may contain: 2 people

PNP chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa (left) and Senator Richard Gordon. INQUIRER, AP FILE PHOTOS

From “Bato” to “Bato-gan”?

An exasperated Senator Richard Gordon called out Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa for failing to address the riding-in-tandem killings in the country.

“General Bato, fix the killings of people riding on motorcycles. Alagad kayo ng batas, ayusin niyo ang batas hindi ang kabaro niyo,” Gordon said in an interview on Thursday.

Gordon was calling out the police chief for allowing the reinstatement of Supt. Marvin Marcos and 18 other cops involved in the killing of Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr.

The senator said Dela Rosa should have told President Duterte that it would be detrimental to the police force if Marcos would be brought back to service.

If the killings would continue, Gordon said he would call Dela Rosa, who earned monicker “Bato” for his tough image, by the name “Bato-gan” (slacker).

“That must be addressed by General Bato. Babaguhin ko na pangalan ni General Bato, lalagyan ko na ng ‘Gan’ para ‘Batogan,’” Gordon said.

The senator also expressed concern over the killing of a provincial health officer in Cavite, who was gunned down last Tuesday by motorcycle-riding men.

“Ang daming namamatay wala silang ginagawa. They will serve the President and this country better if they do their job,” he said. JE

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/913697/gordon-calls-pnp-chief-bato-gan-for-not-addressing-riding-in-tandem-slays#ixzz4mjK5hlLe
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Related:

Philippines: Police Involved in Mayor’s Murder, While in Custody, Reinstated — After President Duterte declared in a speech that he wanted the suspended police official returned to duty

July 13, 2017

 0  0 googleplus0  0

Photo taken in November last year shows Supt. Marvin Marcos attending a hearing of the Senate committee on justice and human rights. GEREMY PINTOLO

MANILA, Philippines – Facing trial for homicide for the killing of a Leyte town mayor last year, Supt. Marvin Marcos is set to go back to active service as chief of the police Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) in Soccsksargen or Region 12.

His being given a new command – as announced by Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa yesterday – came a day after President Duterte declared in a speech that he wanted the suspended police official returned to duty.

“He was reinstated. His case was resolved,” Dela Rosa told reporters in a chance interview on the sidelines of the 25th Defense and Sporting Arms Show in Mandaluyong.

It was not clear which case Dela Rosa was talking about. Marcos and 18 of his men in the CIDG in Eastern Visayas still face criminal charges for two counts of homicide.

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said Marcos may go back to active duty because he had already served his suspension.

“The President respects and abides by the rule of law. Police Superintendent Marcos has served his suspension and is eligible to be back to duty,” Abella said in a statement.

“We leave the matter to the Philippine National Police-Internal Affairs Service (IAS) to explain its decision,” Abella said.

Defending the reinstatement, Dela Rosa said Marcos and his 18 co-defendants in the killing of detained Albuera town mayor Rolando Espinosa and fellow inmate Raul Yap last year had availed themselves of legal remedies under the country’s judicial system.

Dela Rosa added that police officers accused of wrongdoing are as much entitled to due process as ordinary crime suspects.

Marcos’ appointment was effective July 11, but he has yet to report to his new assignment, said Region 12 police director Chief Supt. Cedric Train. The command covers South Cotabato, Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, Sarangani and General Santos City.

“There is already an order but he has yet to report here. He is still at Camp Crame ,” Train said in a phone interview.

Marcos used to head the CIDG-Central Visayas before he and the 18 other police officers were relieved for their role in the killing of Espinosa and Yap in their cells at the Leyte sub-provincial jail before dawn last November.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) earlier downgraded the charges against them from murder to homicide. With the downgrading of the case, Marcos and his men were allowed to post bail.

Dela Rosa said Marcos’ co-accused would also be reassigned to field offices after serving penalties recommended by the PNP-IAS.

He said the penalties include suspension, demotion and admonition. There was no recommendation for dismissal from the service.

“Here comes the decision. Why can’t we accept it?” the PNP chief said, addressing critics.

Dela Rosa challenged Marcos and the other police officers to work hard in their new assignments, “and show they are good policemen.”

Tough assignments

CIDG director Chief Supt. Roel Obusan said Marcos and his companions would be sent to areas where militants like the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters (BIFF) were active.

“Doon sa BIFF and ISIS area,” Obusan told The STAR in a text message when asked where Marcos and the others would be assigned.

Islamic State (IS)-inspired Maute bandits have been fighting government troops in Marawi since May 23. The Maute depredation had prompted Duterte to declare martial law in Mindanao.

“It would be up to the CIDG where to assign him,” Dela Rosa said, referring to Marcos. “He will be back on full duty status so he can be utilized again by the PNP for whatever assignment given to him.”

For his part, National Police Commission (Napolcom) vice chairman Rogelio Casurao said there was nothing wrong with President Duterte declaring his desire to have Marcos reinstated.

At the 26th anniversary of the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology last Wednesday, Duterte said Marcos should be reinstated because he was not part of the team that went to Espinosa’s jail cell.

“Marcos was suspended. He has served his suspension… so I said give back to the man his job. He’s not there anyway,” the President said in Filipino.

“Legally there is nothing wrong,” Casurao said, adding that the President did not directly order his officials to reinstate Marcos and the other policemen.

“So there you are, I hope our fellow Filipinos will understand there is nothing malicious about that from the legal point of view as well as the practical point of view,” Casurao said in a radio interview.

He pointed out that while Marcos and his companions are back in the police service, the Leyte regional trial court would be hearing the homicide case against the policemen.

“While they are working, there is progress in the case against them with the Department of Justice,” he said.

“That’s never the intention,” Casurao said to dispel impression that Marcos and the others were being exonerated. “In the first place, they are still in the service, they’re getting salaries doing nothing,” he said.

“At present there is nothing irregular about that, there’s still a trial in Leyte. What’s not good is if they’re exonerated of homicide even if there’s pending trial,” he said.

He also pointed out that President Duterte as chief executive has the prerogative to issue directives within the executive department.

“While it is the prerogative of the President to do that, remember the DOJ, the PNP and the Napolcom – these are all part of the executive department and only the President has final say on this,” he added.

He also urged the public not to make the situation more complicated by jumping to conclusions.

“Let’s try to help ease the situation and the problem of our government. We have so many problems because of the Marawi incident – let’s not make them worse by making wrong speculations,” he said.

Casurao said while the Senate may have found in the killing of Espinosa a case of murder, the DOJ has spoken and ruled that it was homicide.

“If there are findings concerning legal liability of murder, Senate can investigate the case in aid of legislation,” he said. – With Cecille Suerte Felipe, Alexis Romero

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/07/14/1719384/cidgs-marcos-returns-duty-region-12

Photos on obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
.

Related:

.
.
.
.
.
.

Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

.

Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
.

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Policemen Turned Murders Starting To Get More Attention — Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. Killed By Police in Prison — How Corrupt Are The Philippine Police?

July 13, 2017

Gordon hits Bato for not advising Duterte against reinstating Marcos

 / 05:37 PM July 13, 2017
Image may contain: 2 people, text

PNP chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa (left) and Senator Richard Gordon. INQUIRER FILE PHOTOS

Senator Richard Gordon slammed Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa for failing to tell President Duterte that reinstating Supt. Marvin Marcos and 18 other cops involved in the murder of Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. would be bad for the police force.

“There are cowards around the President who are not telling the truth,” Gordon told reporters in an interview at his office on Thursday.

“Sinabi ‘yan ni Bato noon na galit siya sa ginawa ni Marcos (Bato said in the past that he’s angry at what Marcos did) but he should have stayed the course and he should have told the President,” Gordon said.

“Ang hirap sa PNP hindi nila ina-advise-an ang Presidente. Dapat sinasabi nila na nakakasama sa police force ‘yang ginawa niyang ‘yan,” he added.

(The thing that’s wrong with the PNP is that they don’t advise the President. They should have told him that what he’s doing is detrimental to the police force.)

The senator said President Duterte will be on a “dangerous ground” if his men would continue giving him bad advice.

“They are exploiting his feelings. Ayaw nilang humarap. Ayaw nilang magsabi na, ‘Boss, mali ‘yan’ (They don’t want to face him. They don’t want to say, ‘Boss, that’s wrong’),” Gordon said.

“I respect the President but I must say that people around him should pay him a lot more respect by telling him the truth,” he added. JE

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/913626/gordon-hits-bato-for-not-advising-duterte-against-reinstating-marcos#ixzz4mhxViq36
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Related:

.
.
.
.
.
.

Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

.

Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
.

Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
.
.

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

 

Philippine police use hospitals to hide drug war killings — Plus Philippine National Police Chief Response

July 1, 2017

By Reuters

Since late 2016, police have delivered hundreds of drug suspects to Manila hospitals. A Reuters investigation has revealed almost all were dead on arrival. Witnesses and family members say they were executed and their bodies removed from the scene in a police cover up.

.

Filed June 29, 2017, noon GMT

.

MANILA – The residents of Old Balara hid in their homes when gunfire erupted in their Manila district last September. They didn’t see the police operation that killed seven drug suspects that night.

But they witnessed the gory aftermath and it haunts them still.

That night, Herlina Alim said she watched police haul away the men’s bodies, leaving trails of blood. “They were dragged down the alley like pigs,” she said. Her neighbor Lenlen Magano said she saw three bodies, face down and motionless, piled at the end of the alley while police stood calmly by.

It was at least an hour, according to residents, before the victims were thrown into a truck and taken to hospital in what a police report said was a bid to save their lives. Old Balara’s chief, the elected head of the district, told Reuters he was perplexed. They were already dead, Allan Franza said, so why take them to hospital?

An analysis of crime data from two of Metro Manila’s five police districts and interviews with doctors, law enforcement officials and victims’ families point to one answer: Police were sending corpses to hospitals to destroy evidence at crime scenes and hide the fact that they were executing drug suspects.

Philippine police rack up an almost perfect deadly record in drug war

Thousands of people have been killed since President Rodrigo Duterte took office on June 30 last year and declared war on what he called “the drug menace.” Among them were the seven victims from Old Balara who were declared dead on arrival at hospital.

A Reuters analysis of police reports covering the first eight months of the drug war reveals hundreds of cases like those in Old Balara. In Quezon City Police District and neighboring Manila Police District, 301 victims were taken to hospital after police drug operations. Only two survived. The rest were dead on arrival.

The data also shows a sharp increase in the number of drug suspects declared dead on arrival in these two districts each month. There were 10 cases at the start of the drug war in July 2016, representing 13 percent of police drug shooting deaths. By January 2017, the tally had risen to 51 cases or 85 percent. The totals grew along with international and domestic condemnation of Duterte’s campaign.

This increase was no coincidence, said a police commander in Manila, who spoke to Reuters on condition of anonymity. In late 2016, he said, police began sending victims to hospitals to avoid crime scene investigations and media attention that might show they were executing drug suspects. A Reuters investigation last year found that when police opened fire in drug operations, they killed 97 percent of people they shot.

The Manila commander said police depended on emergency room doctors being too focused on the patients to care about why they were shot. The doctors “aren’t asking any questions. They only record it: DOA,” he said.

But five doctors told Reuters they were troubled by the rising number of police-related DOAs. Four said many drug suspects brought to hospital had been shot in the head and heart, sometimes at close range – precise and unsurvivable wounds that undermined police claims that suspects were injured during chaotic exchanges of gunfire.

Oscar Albayalde, Metro Manila’s police chief, said he had never heard of officers taking dead suspects to hospital to cover up crime scenes. “We will have that investigated,” he told Reuters. If that investigation showed police were “intentionally moving these dead bodies and bringing them to the hospitals just to alter the evidence, then I think we have to make them explain.”

Duterte’s office declined to expand on Albayalde’s response to Reuters’ questions.

TROUBLED: Allan Franza, chief of Manila’s Old Balara district, where police fatally shot seven drug suspects last September. He said he felt uneasy when asked to take the corpses to hospital. REUTERS/Clare Baldwin

According to police reports about the incidents, suspects shot during operations were “immediately rushed” to hospital. “The most important (thing) is the life of the person,” said Randy Llanderal, a precinct commander in Quezon City. The police reports reviewed by Reuters showed Llanderal had led or joined operations in which 13 drug suspects ended up dead on arrival.

Llanderal said all suspects were shot in self-defense during legitimate operations.

The Manila police commander, a retired senior officer and some doctors believe there is a cover up. Hospitalizing drug suspects who have been shot allows police to project a more caring image, said the Manila commander. The retired officer agreed. “It is basically a ploy to make the public believe that the police are mindful of the safety and survival of suspects,” he said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

The Manila commander said his officers were instructed to shoot at “sensitive areas.” Suspects who survived were shot again to finish them off or smothered with their own clothing, he said.

A Reuters examination of the Old Balara incident and similar operations also suggests that the purpose of hospital runs was to destroy evidence rather than save lives. Police manhandled gunshot victims and showed no urgency in getting them medical treatment, said three sets of family members and other witnesses.

Interactive graphic. Click here

“You obliterate the crime scene – the evidence.”

Rizaldy Rivera, an agent at the Philippines’ National Bureau of Investigation

Removing bodies makes it harder to work out what really happened. “You obliterate the crime scene – the evidence,” said Rizaldy Rivera, an agent at the Philippines’ National Bureau of Investigation who has investigated allegations of police brutality. Police forensic investigators at the scene, said Rivera, must carry out their work on what is effectively a “tampered crime scene.”

Scene of Crime Operatives, or SOCO units as police forensic teams are called, process crime scenes and conduct autopsies. Aurelio Trampe, the police general who oversees SOCO, said police officers haven’t been removing bodies to alter crime scenes. He said they have the discretion to disregard crime-scene investigative procedures “just as long as they could save lives.”

SOCO can still collect evidence from bodies once they reach the hospital, but doesn’t always do so. Instead, said SOCO forensic chief Reynaldo Calaoa, that task falls to a police investigator assigned to the case. That investigator often hails from the same station as the colleagues who killed the suspect.

SHOOTING: The house in Manila’s Old Balara district where police fatally shot seven drug suspects last September. Pictured in April, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew R.C. Marshall

“All of them were cold to the touch.”

Jerome Paez, a doctor at East Avenue Medical Center

Such practices can leave the system open to abuse, said Raquel Del Rosario Fortun, an independent forensic scientist and chair of the University of the Philippines Manila pathology department.

“They do the shooting, they do the killing – and they investigate themselves,” she said. “Impunity, that’s what’s happening.”

Old Balara is part of Quezon City, the largest of the 17 cities and municipalities that make up Metro Manila, and the most populous city in the Philippines.

Old Balara district chief Franza said police insisted his staff of volunteer security guards bring drug-war casualties from operations to the hospital – even when it was clear they were dead. Because he has assisted the police by transporting casualties, the victims’ families have accused him and his staff of complicity in the killings, he said.

In March, Franza decided he had had enough. Keep responding to police calls, he told his staff, but don’t take a body to hospital without the go-ahead from SOCO crime scene investigators. “I decided not to take action which I think is not proper,” said Franza.

The seven victims from Old Balara arrived at East Avenue Medical Center stacked in a flatbed truck and another vehicle, said Jerome Paez, an attending physician at the emergency room that night. Most had been shot in the head and many also had multiple gunshots in their chests, he said. None were breathing or had a pulse.

EMERGENCY ROOM: A drug suspect shot by police arrives at a public hospital in central Manila in June. He was declared dead on arrival. REUTERS/Dondi Tawatao

“All of them were cold to the touch,” said Paez, who has dealt with 21 drug suspects pronounced dead on arrival.

The victims had been refused admission earlier at Quezon City General Hospital’s emergency room, a 15-minute drive away, because they were already dead, said district chief Franza. The hospital told Reuters it had no record of receiving patients from Old Balara that night.

The Old Balara bodies were already in the morgue of East Avenue Medical Center by the time the mother of victim Elmer Gayoso arrived. She asked Reuters to withhold her name, saying she feared retribution from the police.

Gayoso had been shot through the head and the heart, she said, and the headshot had destroyed his face. She said her husband identified him by scouring his corpse for familiar childhood scars. The wounds were so grave that she didn’t believe that the police took Gayoso to the hospital to save his life.

“That was their pretense,” she said, weeping.

The killings also troubled Paez, the ER doctor. “We documented everything, just in case in the future it is needed for investigation,” he said.

Even if doctors at East Avenue Medical Center suspect a new arrival is dead, hospital protocol requires them to try to resuscitate the patient, said Paez. This is costly and wastes time at a big public hospital teeming with patients. In a recent visit by Reuters, old people wearing oxygen masks lay unmoving on gurneys. New patients arrived every few minutes.

Asked about the number of drug suspects arriving dead at hospital, the acting director of the East Avenue Medical Center, Victoria Abesamis, said: “I cannot categorically say that the police are bringing these dead bodies because they want to cover up. I think I will give them the benefit of the doubt.”

TRAINED SHOOTER

Lawrence Bello and three other doctors at East Avenue Medical Center interviewed by Reuters also expressed unease about handling dead-on-arrival cases from police operations.

Bello said the police would sometimes deliver bodies that were already displaying rigor mortis, which sets in several hours after death. East Avenue would get two or three such bodies per month, he said.

Bello has dealt with 20 cases where suspects were dead on arrival following a police operation, according to Quezon City Police District data. One of them, Bello said, had a single gunshot wound. The bullet had entered below the chin and exited through the top of the head. Bello said he found the injury “quite questionable.”

Such an injury is usually associated with victims of suicide or execution, said Homer Venters of Physicians for Human Rights, a group based in New York that investigates mass atrocities. “It is very hard for that to happen when a person isn’t fully compliant,” he said. Venters didn’t examine the body that Bello referred to.

Patel Mayuga, another ER doctor at East Avenue Medical Center, has pronounced 10 victims of police shootings dead on arrival, according to Quezon City Police District data. Suspects who are dead on arrival usually have “clean shots” in the forehead or chest, suggesting the killings were intentional, said Mayuga. “If they are shot in the chest or head, there was time for the attacker to prepare,” he said.

Many other drug suspects brought to hospitals in Quezon City by police were also shot in the head and heart, often from less than a meter away, four doctors told Reuters.

One January evening, police delivered five bodies in a small jeepney bus to the state-run Novaliches District Hospital in Quezon City. The floor of the jeepney bus was puddled with the victims’ blood and excrement, recalled Lawrence Laguno, the ER doctor on duty. According to police, the victims had all pulled guns and opened fire on undercover officers during an anti-drug operation. They missed, and the police returned fire.

IMPUNITY: Forensic pathologist Raquel Del Rosario Fortun told Reuters that crime scenes are open to abuse because the police “investigate themselves”. REUTERS/Dondi Tawatao

“All suspects were seriously injured,” said the police report. “Thereafter, wounded suspects were rushed to Novaliches District Hospital for medical treatment but pronounced dead on arrival by attending physician, Dr. Lawrence Laguno.”

Laguno told Reuters that all five men had been shot in the head and chest, with almost the same entry and exit wounds – injuries that looked to him both deliberate and impossible to survive. “It’s unusual to have the same five patients with almost the same injuries,” said the doctor. “It was a trained shooter. They knew what they were doing.”

Venters of Physicians for Human Rights said it is “incredibly rare” to sustain a tight grouping of gunshot wounds in a shootout. Venters, a medical doctor, has overseen research and investigations into extrajudicial killings. When bullets enter a body from the same direction and plane, it shows the target wasn’t moving, he said. “Either they were surprised and shot, or they were subdued and shot.”

Willie Saludares, acting chairman of the emergency room at East Avenue Medical Center, said doctors didn’t follow up on questionable cases, since how patients were killed wasn’t their concern. “I’m sorry to sound too cold, but that’s the way it is,” he said. “I am only concerned about the health of the patient. I’m not doing investigative work.”

Nor, it seemed, were others. Saludares said that state agencies that investigate police killings, such as the Commission on Human Rights or the National Bureau of Investigation, didn’t come to interview him. Saludares also said he was uncomfortable speaking freely and feared losing his job.

MAKING INQUIRIES: Metro Manila police chief Oscar Albayalde told Reuters in June he hadn’t heard of his officers removing bodies from crime scenes. He promised to investigate. REUTERS/Dondi Tawatao

Chito Gascon, chairman of the Commission on Human Rights, said that if specific cases were brought to the agency’s attention, its investigators should pursue them and secure testimony from doctors. But the Commission was stretched, he added. “The CHR, given its current capacity constraints, is only able to investigate and document a fraction of all the deaths that have been reported by the media,” he said.

The National Bureau of Investigation didn’t comment.

“THEY WEREN’T BREATHING”

Police say they don’t shoot to kill and that saving lives is paramount. But 17 witnesses interviewed by Reuters say their behavior at crime scenes suggests the opposite.

In September, in a district called Nagkaisang Nayon, precinct commander Llanderal led an operation that added six dead-on-arrival cases to the Quezon City body count. According to a police report, the suspects – five men and a woman – opened fire on undercover officers posing as drug buyers. They missed, and the officers returned fire.

“When the smoke cleared,” said the report, “all suspects sustained gunshot wounds on their body. Immediately thereafter, all suspects were rushed to Novaliches District Hospital for medical treatment but (were) pronounced dead on arrival.” None of the officers were injured.

Llanderal acknowledged that removing the bodies disturbed the crime scene, but insisted the suspects were alive. “They were still moving. All of them!” he said.

Bereaved relatives and other witnesses told Reuters the bodies were taken to hospital an hour or more after the shooting, and that none of the victims showed signs of life. “They weren’t moving. They weren’t breathing,” said Feliciano Dela Cruz, the local district chief.

“It’s not possible they were alive,” said Jocelyn Ceron, 47, whose husband, Ronaldo, was among the dead. “We saw them thrown in the back of a truck.”

Ceron said Ronaldo’s body had six bullet wounds: three in the chest or torso, one in the leg, and one in each hand. Relatives said the other bodies each bore at least six gunshot wounds. Ceron showed Reuters photos of the crime scene.

Llanderal confirmed that the photos were taken by police investigators and showed the immediate aftermath of his operation. One photo shows a woman lying face down in a blood-smeared alleyway. Others show a tiny room in which five men lie slumped in pools of blood or on the floor; two guns are clearly visible.

Reuters shared the crime scene photos with Fortun, the independent forensic scientist. “Based on the pictures, they are apparently very dead,” Fortun said of the six victims.

For so many bodies to be crammed into a tiny room “doesn’t seem consistent” with police claims that the suspects were shot while fleeing during a gun battle, she added.

Relatives of Ronaldo Ceron believe the police executed him and others in cold blood. A neighbour called Maricol Amacna said she heard one of the men begging, “Don’t kill me, sir!” The Commission on Human Rights says it is investigating the killings.

The police have dismissed allegations of wrongdoing as “useless and baseless,” and have issued commendations to Llanderal and his men for “the extraordinary courage you have displayed in the successful operation . . . which resulted in the neutralization” of the suspects.

Llanderal denied executing drug suspects. “In police operations, we don’t know where the bullets may hit,” he said. “Some suspects retaliate, fight us. We are only defending ourselves.”

LINE OF DUTY: Police line up for a flag-raising ceremony outside a station in Quezon City Police District in Manila in April. REUTERS/Andrew R.C. Marshall

Additional reporting by Manuel Mogato and Chin Samson

.

Dead on Arrival

By Clare Baldwin and Andrew R.C. Marshall

Photo editing: Thomas White

Graphics: Simon Scarr and Jin Wu

Design: Catherine Tai

Video: Graham Mackay

Edited by Janet McBride and Peter Hirschberg

http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/philippines-duterta-doa/

******************************************

The Philippines’ police chief on Friday stood by anti-narcotics officers and rejected a Reuters investigation that pointed to a pattern of police sending corpses of drug suspects to hospitals to destroy crime scene evidence and hide executions.

President Rodrigo Duterte took office in the Philippines a year ago, launching a bloody war on drugs that has killed thousands of Filipinos.

PREVIOUSLY FROM REUTERS INVESTIGATES:

Philippine police use hospitals to hide drug war killings

Podcast: Dead on arrival in Duterte’s drug war

In a television interview to mark the anniversary, Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Ronald dela Rosa appeared irritated by questions about the Reuters report, published on Thursday, and said police carrying out anti-drugs operations had a duty to save lives, even when encountering violent resistance.

He said police were not medically qualified to determine whether a victim was dead or alive and sent victims to hospital as part of operational procedure.

“What do you want, we let the wounded die? You don’t want us to rescue his life?” he told news channel ANC.

The Reuters investigation analyzed crime data from two of Metro Manila’s five police districts and included accounts of doctors, witnesses, law enforcement officials and victims’ families. [nL8N1JQ2NQ]

It showed a pattern of police sending dead bodies to hospitals, preventing thorough crime scene investigations from taking place after the killing of drug suspects. [nL8N1JQ2NQ]

Dela Rosa said Reuters, which has produced a series of in-depth reports into the war on drugs that have questioned official accounts, was “looking for faults” in the police.

“PNP is damned if you do, damned if you don’t. Reuters really is looking for faults in us. We have to stand by our police operational procedure that in case of an encounter, if a person is not yet declared dead by the physician, you need to bring him to the hospital.”

He added: “Who are the policemen to say they are dead? They are not medical practitioners. If we did not bring them to the hospitals, the relatives might sue us.”

A spokeswoman for Reuters said the news agency stood by its reporting.

Duterte’s bloody campaign has been condemned by human rights groups and alarmed Western countries due to the high death toll and allegations of systematic extrajudicial killings and cover-ups by police. The PNP rejects those allegations.

FEW SURVIVORS

Reuters looked at police reports covering the first eight months of the drug war, which showed that in Quezon City Police District and neighboring Manila Police District, 301 victims were sent to hospital after police anti-drug operations. Only two survived and the rest were dead on arrival.

In nearly all cases where drug suspects have died during police operations in the year-long crackdown, the official accounts say police fired in self defense. Police say they do not shoot to kill.

Activists, however, say the circumstances behind many of the killings in police sting operations point to executions. A Reuters investigation last year found that when police opened fire in anti-drug operations, they killed 97 percent of people they shot.

The data analyzed in the latest Reuters investigation shows a sharp increase in the number of drug suspects declared dead on arrival in the Quezon City and Manila districts each month.

There were 10 cases when the drug war started a year ago in July 2016, or 13 percent of police drug shooting deaths. By January 2017, the tally rose to 51 cases, or 85 percent, at a time when criticism of Duterte’s campaign intensified.

A police commander who spoke to Reuters on condition of anonymity said the increase was no coincidence and police were

trying to prevent crime scene investigations and media attention that might show they were executing suspects.

Human rights groups say the anti-drugs crackdown, the signature policy of the populist Duterte, has been disastrous and has almost entirely targeted the poor, with most of those killed or arrested drug users and small-time dealers, with narcotics kingpins largely untouched.

Dela Rosa said police should not be disparaged for trying to save victims and the removal of bodies from a crime scene did not mean a proper investigation could not be carried out.

“Do not put malice in what the police does,” he said. “The crime scene is there even without the dead body.”

(Reporting by Martin Petty and Neil Jerome Morales; Editing by Alex Richardson)

***************************************************

Bato: Hospitals not being used for police coverup

A report from Reuters said many of the drug offenders who ended up in hospitals could have been dead even before they were brought there, possibly part of an attempt by police to cover up the killings. File

MANILA, Philippines –  Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa defended anti-narcotics operatives in Metro Manila from allegations that they use hospitals to cover up summary executions of suspected drug pushers.

A report from Reuters said many of the drug offenders who ended up in hospitals could have been dead even before they were brought there, possibly part of an attempt by police to cover up the killings.

An irate Dela Rosa hit back at Reuters in a televised interview over ANC on Friday, saying the news agency is bent on looking for flaws in their anti-drug operations.

“What does Reuters want? We just leave a person who has been shot to die?” Dela Rosa remarked.

“The PNP is damned if you do, damned if you don’t. Reuters is really looking for faults,” he said.

Interior and Local Government officer-in-charge Catalino Cuy ordered an investigation into the allegations.

Malacañang deferred to Dela Rosa to answer the allegations.

President Rodrigo Duterte

“The PNP has already answered this matter and we defer to their response,” said presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said.

Abella refused to answer further queries on whether President Duterte will continue to protect policemen who have resorted to cutting corners to attain the Chief Executive’s order to go after drug offenders.

“We will not make any comments regarding that matter. We will defer to the answer of General Bato (Dela Rosa),” he added.

A total of 3,200 people have been killed in anti-drug operations from July 1, 2016 to June 13, 2017, the government said.

A total of 49 drug suspects were killed in the past week after they allegedly put up a fight with the police.

Some 47 lawmen have been killed and 132 others were wounded in anti-drug operations since last year.

“We will live and die with our war on drugs,” he said.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa (R) during a press conference at the Malacanang palace in Manila on January 30, 2017. © NOEL CELIS / POOL / AFP

Dela Rosa vowed the campaign will be relentless until the last drug lord and pusher are arrested.

“We will finish it up to the last infrastructure of their shabu network business,” Dela Rosa said.

Debunking claims the police were orchestrating a cover up, Dela Rosa said it is part of their police procedures to save lives of criminals who engage policemen in a shootout.

Dela Rosa expressed frustration that police operatives are being portrayed negatively for doing their job.

“If we do not bring the suspect to the hospital, there is intention to kill, that’s why we left him to die. If we bring him to the hospital, we’ll be accused of covering up. Where do we go now?” he asked.

Reuters said 97 percent of the 301 drug suspects taken to hospitals in Quezon City and Manila were declared dead on arrival.

Dela Rosa retorted: “Who are you to say a person is dead? Are you a doctor? Only a doctor should declare (that a person is dead).”

He explained investigators can still process scenes even if the body was already taken out.

“Don’t put malice in the actions of the police because the crime scene is still there even if the body is gone,” Dela Rosa said.

He maintained they would never tolerate policemen who  commit abuses in the government’s war on drugs.

He added the campaign of purging the police ranks of scalawags continues as he revealed he is about to sign dismissal orders of 84 police officers whose administrative cases have been resolved.

“In less than one year, I was able to dismiss around 160 personnel. There are even more coming,” Dela Rosa said.

–  With Christina Mendez

Related:

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial