Posts Tagged ‘Ronald dela Rosa’

Philippines: ‘More poor dead in drug war because most pushers are poor’ — Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa says

October 3, 2017
Three of five Filipinos believe that only the poor are killed in the government’s anti-illegal drug campaign, the Social Weather Stations said in its latest survey. AFP/Noel Celis

MANILA, Philippines — Poor people are more likely to be killed in the government’s anti-illegal drugs campaign because there are more of them involved in selling drugs.

Philippine National Police Director General Ronald Dela Rosa stressed this point on Tuesday in reaction to the a Social Weather Stations survey that found that three of every five Filipinos believe only the poor are killed in drug operations.

Image result for Ronald Dela Rosa, Photos

“Totoo naman talaga [na] panay mahihirap [ang namamatay],” Dela Rosa told reporters on the sidelines of the signing of a partnership between the PNP and Light Rail Transport Administration.

He added: “You have to understand the dynamics of drug pyramid. ‘Yung mayayaman na drug lord, iisa ang drug lord sa taas, pababa ‘yan. ‘Yung pinakamababa ‘yung street-pushing level, puro mahirap ‘yun.”

According to the SWS survey, 60 percent agreed – 33 percent strongly and 27 percent somewhat agreed – with the statement “rich drug pushers are not killed; only the poor ones are killed”.

Of the 1,200 respondents from Metro Manila, Balance Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao, 23 percent disagreed – 12 percent somewhat and 11 percent strongly – while 17 percent were undecided.

 Related image

The poll was conducted nationwide from June 23 to 26, using face-to-face interviews of 1,200 adults aged 18 years and above.

Chief Inspector Kimberly Molitas, National Capital Region Police Office spokesperson, echoed Dela Rosa’s statement, saying the drug trade is more prevalent in poor areas.

According to the latest statistics released by the PNP, there have been 6,225 drug-related deaths since July 2016.

The PNP said 3,850 have “died in police operations,” suggesting these are drug suspects who engaged arresting officers in shootouts.

READ: Bato to drug war critics: You’re ingrates

‘Big fish are targeted too’

Asked whether the government’s drug war only targets poor drug pushers, Dela Rosa responded, “Bakit mahirap ba si Parojinog? Mahirap ba si Espinosa? Hindi naman.”

Image result for Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa

He was referring to the deaths of alleged narco-politicians Ozamiz City Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog Sr., his wife Susan, and Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa who were killed in police operations. (Note 1)

“Andami nang nakuha. I-cover niyo yung mga nakuha,” the police chief told reporters.

The Senate public order committee report said the killing of Espinosa was premeditated and involved abuse of authority.

Last month, P1.3 million worth of illegal drugs were seized during a raid on a condominium in Mandaluyong City.

The suspected dealer, Jovet Atillano, is said to be a major distributor of illegal drugs in Metro Manila, Baguio City, Cebu and Boracay island.

Most of his clients are young professionals and affluent people, authorities said.

Molitas also denied that more operations are conducted in marginalized communities than posh areas.

“Drug operations is regionwide regardless if it’s a poor or affluent area,” she told Philstar.com.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/10/03/1745140/more-poor-dead-drug-war-because-most-pushers-are-poor

Note 1:  Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. was killed in a “firefight” after allegedly resisting arrest inside the Baybay, Leyte Sub-Provincial Jail.

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

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Philippines ‘War’ On Illegal Drugs: President Duterte admits he miscalculated — Expect more killings over a longer period of time

August 17, 2017
President Rodrigo Roa Duterte shows the updated list of those involved in illegal drugs in his speech during the 19th founding anniversary of the Volunteers Against Crime and Corruption (VACC) in Malacañan Palace on August 16, 2017. REY BANIQUET/PRESIDENTIAL PHOTO

Rody admits mistake in 6-month deadline

MANILA, Philippines – Expect more drug killings throughout the term of President Duterte, who admitted yesterday that he had miscalculated the extent of the drug menace and his capability to stop it.

With his home city of Davao as his template, the President said he had believed he could also eradicate the drug problem nationwide in just six months.

“Alam ko na nagkamali ako. Nagkamali talaga ako. Hindi ko naman talaga akalain, iyang Bureau of Customs na iyan, akala ko kaalyado ko (I know I made a mistake. I really made a mistake. I really never thought that Bureau of Customs, I thought it’s an ally),” he said in remarks before Ozamiz City police officers and men.

“How can I control it in three to six months? The generals and policemen are involved. The Bureau of Customs, an agency I am relying on, son of a b****, is into drugs. How will I succeed?”

Duterte also argued that the drug war has been curtailing the freedoms of citizens.

The President cited the case of the Parojinogs, one of the political clans accused of having ties with drug syndicates. Police killed Ozamiz City mayor Reynaldo Parojinog Sr., his wife and several others on July 30 after they allegedly fought it out with policemen serving search warrants.

“The people here (in Ozamiz) have tasted patronage politics… You will be next. Follow them and you will be next. I will not stop this… I said to the police and the military: destroy the apparatus, the organization of drug syndicates,” the President said.

“Kaya ikaw ‘pag namatay kayo, ma-mayor ka, ma-congressman, gobernador ka, pasensya ka (Now, you die. If you are a mayor, a congressman, a governor, if you get killed, sorry). That is my order,” he added.

“I hope that I can get rid of it before I go out of my office. I hope I will witness it. Dahan-dahanin ko lang ‘yan sila (I will do it slowly).”

He said in jest that those he would spare would be sent on a ship to the South Pole and left to fend for themselves.

Duterte projected himself as a no-nonsense, tough-talking crime buster during the campaign, leading him to win the 2016 presidential race by a landslide.

The longtime Davao City mayor, who vowed to suppress narcotics in six months, got more than 16 million votes, beating his more moneyed rivals, all of whom had previously held national posts.

In September 2016, Duterte sought a six-month extension for his drug crackdown, saying he was shocked by the magnitude of the problem. He later admitted that the drug menace could not be solved easily and that the crackdown would have to continue until the end of his six-year term.

“I said my critics were right. You said, when you become president, you can do it in three to six months. I was not aware of the problem when I assumed office. Davao was just my template. There were drugs there but if you bring drugs there, you will die,” Duterte said.

He also maintained that the Philippines has degenerated into a “narcotic country.”

“Now, you ask, the Philippines, are we or are we not a narcotic country? Yes, we are,” Duterte said.

“I did not know it when I was still mayor… Now that I am President, I told governors and mayors, do not ever f*** with drugs because if you destroy my country, I will kill you. I have been repeating that.”

Thousands have died since Duterte launched his bloody war on drugs but figures released by the government and civil society contradict each other.

Previous reports have placed the death toll at around 9,000 but police officials claimed only about 3,000 drug personalities have been killed in law enforcement operations.

The anti-drugs campaign has drawn flak from human rights groups in the country and abroad but Duterte has refused to listen to his critics, whom he accused of trivializing the drug problem.

“Human rights, wala akong pakialam sa inyo. May trabaho ako at gagawin ko (I do not care about what you say. I have a work to do and I will do it),” the President said.

Duterte said his fight against illegal drugs would not spare anyone, not even his friends.

“Walang kaibi-kaibigan sa akin. Either patayin kita o patayin mo ako. Pareho lang sa akin (Friendships don’t matter to me. Either I kill you or you kill me. It’s the same for me). Just stop playing with drugs,” the President said.

Duterte reiterated that he would protect policemen who would face charges in connection with the drug war, even promising to pardon and promote them in case they get convicted.

“My warning is this: do not lie to me. Just tell me the truth because there is always a remedy. In the performance of duty, you’ll have no problems,” he added.

Duterte also warned policemen engaged in illegal drugs, saying he has offered P2-million bounty each for their arrest.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/18/1730277/6-years-drug-war

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippine National Police Chief: Deaths in anti-drug ops are “just usual” — “The problem is still there” — “We still need to step up”

August 17, 2017

By Allan Nawal – Correspondent / @inqmindanaoInquirer Mindanao / 04:11 PM August 17, 2017

Image may contain: 1 person, text

PNP Chief General Ronald dela Rosa
EDWIN BACASMAS/INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

OZAMIZ CITY—Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Dir. Gen. Ronald dela Rosa said there was nothing unusual in the deaths of some suspects during anti-drug operations because these individuals really put up a fight.

Dela Rosa said what would be unusual if all those being arrested during the so-called “one-time, big-time” operations had been shot dead.

“Magtaka kayo kung patay lahat. Marami namang buhay na nahuli (You should start to wonder if everyone is dead. There were suspects arrested and they are alive),” he said in a speech before members of the city’s police force on Thursday.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Police start to investigate after shooting an apparent drug dealer in Manila. Photograph: Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

 

Despite the deaths related to the police anti-drug operations, Dela Rosa said the PNP “still needs to step up.”

“The problem is still there,” he said.

Dela Rosa also urged policemen to just do their job and avoid politics.

“We should not care about politics, we should just maintain order and safety,” he added. JPV

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/923476/pnp-war-on-drugs-pnp-chief-ronald-dela-rosa-government-anti-drug-war-bulacan-raids-mpd-anti-drug-ops#ixzz4q0YDJYM4
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Related:
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Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines; Government Human Rights Watchdog Says Philippine National Police Must Follow Existing Law and Rules of Engagement Covering Arrest and Search Warrants

August 1, 2017
Images released by the PNP show mugshots of Ozamiz Vice Mayor Nova Princess Parojinog- Echavez (left) and her brother Reynaldo Parojinog Jr. taken during booking procedures at Camp Crame last Tuesday.

MANILA, Philippines – An official of the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) yesterday reminded the Philippine National Police (PNP) to comply with the existing rules of engagement covering arrest and search warrants.

“There are set procedures on how to legally and validly serve warrants of arrest or search warrants,” CHR commissioner Gwendolyn Pimentel-Gana said when asked about the statement of PNP chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa that there will be more to come after the deadly raid in Ozamiz City that killed the mayor and 14 others last Sunday.

Gana, who heads the CHR task force on extrajudicial killings, said they would also look at the raid that resulted in the death of Ozamiz City mayor Reynaldo Parojinog Sr., his wife Susan, two siblings and 11 others.

“We are still awaiting the report of the police on how the operation was done,” the CHR official said.

“The CHR is mandated to look into how the ‘duty bearer’ – the police in this case – did their job, that is whether the operation was done legitimately and whether due process was observed,” she added.

CHR spokesperson Jacqueline de Guia earlier said the commission has already started its investigation on the incident.

“No conclusions yet at this time, but the purpose of the investigation is to determine if protocols were followed in the implementation of the search warrant and use of deadly force,” added De Guia.

Several lawmakers, including Liberal Party president and Sen. Francis Pangilinan, expressed doubt that due process was followed in the raid.

Malacañang, meanwhile, said it would not meddle in the investigation of the CHR.

President Duterte earlier tagged Parojinog and his daughter, arrested Vice Mayor Nova Princess Parojinog-Echavez, as among the narco-politicians in the country. The Parojinogs denied the allegation.

Human rights advocates have assailed the credibility of the police account of the recent killing of the mayor of Ozamiz.

Human Rights Watch said even Pangilinan questioned why the raid occurred at 2:30 a.m. and why police “paralyzed” close circuit television cameras in and around the Parojinog residence, which could have provided visual evidence of how the operation unfolded.

On the other hand, Parojinog’s daughter Nova accused the policemen of planting drugs at the scene.

Phelim Kine, deputy director of Human Rights Watch-Asia Division, said that police killings of two other city mayors implicated in drug trafficking have also raised questions about police methods and accountability.

In October 2016, police killed mayor Samsudin Dimaukom of Datu Saudi Ampatuan town, in the southern Philippine province of Maguindanao in a similar shootout.

On Nov. 5, 2016, police shot dead Espinosa Sr. of Albuera, Leyte in what police described as a firefight in his cell after he brandished a concealed pistol. Espinosa had surrendered to the police following public accusations by Duterte that he was a drug trafficker.

Both the National Bureau of Investigation and the Senate concluded the police officers had committed “premeditated murder” in the Espinosa case.

Despite that ruling, earlier this month, the 18 officers implicated in Espinosa’s death returned to work.

United Nations human rights experts urged the government to immediately act on the increasing reports of human rights violations, including murder, threats against indigenous peoples and the summary execution of children.

“Attacks are spiraling against many groups in society and we are making an urgent appeal for government action,” said a joint statement issued by Agnes Callamard, Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions; Michel Forst, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders; and Maud de Boer-Buquicchio, Special Rapporteur on the sale and sexual exploitation of children.

The experts highlighted numerous killings and extrajudicial executions of villagers, farmers and human rights defenders seeking to protect the ancestral land of lumad indigenous peoples against businesses.

Noy wants Ozamiz probe

Former president Benigno Aquino III expressed belief the killings in Ozamiz City must be investigated because of the number of casualties during the series of raids.

He also called on authorities to determine whether the current strategy being employed in the drug war could really be effective, since the surveys would show the same number of drug users in the country from the time he stepped down until now – which was 1.8 million to 1.3 million.

Aquino told reporters after the mass held for the 8th death anniversary of his mother Corazon, also a former president and democracy icon at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City, that it did not seem feasible to gun down all of those in the houses of the Parojinogs without the raiding team getting hit, since there were only 16 of them while the number of those killed was 15.

He said there could be different treatments for a problem but the question at the end of the day should be: “Has anything changed? There should be a change.”

Aquino said during his time, they tried their best to follow the processes of case build up, gathering of evidence and prosecution of suspects.

He said no matter how successful an operation was, there should be a review of what could be improved, especially when people got killed.

Aquino also stressed they did try their best to curb illegal drugs during his time, along with the many other problems they had to deal with.  – With Aurea Calica, Rhodina Villanueva, Pia Lee-Brago

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/02/1723757/chr-pnp-must-follow-search-arrest-rules

Related:

Image may contain: 2 people

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippines: Human Rights watch Question Police Operations That Killed Mayors, Others — Slaughter “raised questions about the method and accountability of the law enforcers.”

August 1, 2017
Photo shows Ozamis City Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog in a photo dated 2010 on his Facebook account.

MANILA, Philippines — International human rights group reacted to the latest killing of a city mayor in the Philippines, a third incident since President Rodrigo Duterte launched the war against illegal drugs last year.

Human Rights Watch Deputy Director for Asia Phelim Kine said Tuesday that the death of Ozamis City Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog Sr. and 14 others raised questions about the method and accountability of the law enforcers.

Kine said that the claims of the raiding team of Philippine National Police that they were met with volleys of fire from Parojinog’s security is dubious, including the time of the operation which happened during the wee hours of the day.

He asserted that the questionable account of the authorities is not something new since they have already debunked government claims of the lawful nature of the deaths of more than 7,000 suspected drug users and dealers.

“Skepticism of the accounts by Philippine National Police of anti-drug operations is fully-justified,” Kine said in a dispatch posted on their website.

“Interviews with witnesses and victims’ relatives, and analysis of police records, show a pattern of unlawful police conduct designed to paint a veneer of legality over extrajudicial executions,” he added.

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Accountability? PNP chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa (left) and Senator Richard Gordon. INQUIRER FILE PHOTOS

READ: Bato says he wanted Parojinog alive

Kine noted the killing of Mayor Samsudin Dimaukom of Datu Saudi Ampatuan in Maguindanao province in October 2016, and the same fate of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. after a month.

Shot and killed in the middle of the night by Philippine Police while in prison: Photos on obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal

PNP chief Ronald dela Rosa, meanwhile, saw the operation as legitimate as he warned that there would be more crackdowns of narco-politicians.

Kine believes that the “police will continue to kill with impunity for the foreseeable future” due to the assurance of the pardon coming from the president himself.

Cops behind the killing of Espinosa in November were reinstated despite the findings of the National Bureau of Investigation and Senate that the mayor’s death was premeditated.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/01/1723571/hrw-skepticism-cops-accounts-parojinog-raid-fully-justified

READ: HRW blasts reinstatement of Marcos, other cops in Espinosa slay

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Indonesia Will Follow The Philippines and Shoot Suspected Drug Traffickers

July 24, 2017
In this March 8, 2017 file photo, Indonesian President Joko Widodo waits for the arrival of his South African counterpart Jacob Zuma at Merdeka Palace in Jakarta. President Jokowi says police should shoot drug traffickers who resist arrest because of a narcotics crisis facing the country. Jokowi’s spokesman, Johan Budi, said Sunday, July 23, 2017, that the president made the comments at a recent meeting of an Indonesian political party. AP/Dita Alangkara, File

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo says police should shoot drug traffickers who resist arrest because of a narcotics crisis facing the country.

Presidential spokesman Johan Budi said Sunday that Jokowi made the comments at a recent meeting of an Indonesian political party.

“We have to take firm action. If drug dealers who operate in Indonesia fight back when arrested, officers can shoot them, because we are in a narcotics emergency position now,” Jokowi said, according to his spokesman.

Local media reported last week that police shot dead a Taiwanese man for resisting arrest during a seizure of 1 ton of crystal methamphetamine, Indonesia’s largest-ever seizure of the drug.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte launched an anti-drug crusade last year in which thousands of alleged drug dealers and users have been killed, often in circumstances akin to lawless summary executions. The crackdown has been condemned by rights groups and governments around the world.

RELATED: Duterte to PNP: Kill 1,000, I’ll protect you | ‘Not acceptable’: Morales slams Duterte’s order to kill criminals

Indonesia has tough anti-drug laws and traffickers can receive the death penalty. Four people, one Indonesian and three Nigerians, were executed by firing squad last year, and dozens are on death row for trafficking.

Budi said Jokowi’s comment is not a shoot to kill order and police actions should be measured and in accordance with the law.

It’s a message to all Indonesians to show the commitment of the government to fighting narcotics, he said.

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Indonesian National Police Chief Tito Karnavian, left, Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa, center, and Royal Malaysia Police Inspector General Khalid Abu Bakar link arms together prior to the start of their Trilateral Security Meeting in suburban Pasay city, southeast of Manila, Philippines Thursday, June 22, 2017. The Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia plan to closely cooperate to halt the flow of militants, weapons, funds and extremist propaganda across their borders as they expressed alarm over recent attacks in their countries. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

Indonesian National Police Chief Tito Karnavian, left, Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa, center, and Royal Malaysia Police Inspector General Khalid Abu Bakar link arms together prior to the start of their Trilateral Security Meeting in suburban Pasay city, southeast of Manila, Philippines Thursday, June 22, 2017. The Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia plan to closely cooperate to halt the flow of militants, weapons, funds and extremist propaganda across their borders as they expressed alarm over recent attacks in their countries. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

Indonesian President Orders Officers to Shoot Drug Traffickers — Following Lead from the Philippines

July 22, 2017

JAKARTA — Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo has instructed law enforcement officers to shoot drug traffickers to deal with a narcotics emergency facing the country.

“Be firm, especially to foreign drug dealers who enter the country and resist arrest. Shoot them because we indeed are in a narcotics emergency position now,” Widodo said in a speech delivered at an event held by one of Indonesia’s political parties late on Friday.

His remarks have drawn comparison to that of Philippine’s President Rodrigo Duterte, who launched a brutal anti-drug crackdown about a year ago that saw many alleged drug dealers killed.

The bloody campaign in the Philippines has drawn condemnation from the international community, including the United Nations.

Indonesia also has tough laws against drugs. Widodo has previously been criticized for ordering executions against convicted drug traffickers who were given a death penalty by the court. Rights activists and some governments have called on Indonesia to abolish the death penalty.

Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo

Friday’s shooting order from Widodo came a week after Indonesian police shot dead a Taiwanese man in a town near the capital Jakarta.

The man, who was part of a group trying to smuggle one tonne of crystal methamphetamine into the country, was killed for resisting arrest, police have said.

After the incident, Indonesian National Police chief Tito Karnavian was quoted by media saying he had ordered officers not to hesitate shooting drug dealers who resist arrest.

Image result for Indonesian National Police chief Tito Karnavian, photos

Indonesian National Police chief Tito Karnavian

(Reporting by Jakarta bureau; Writing by Gayatri Suroyo; Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

Image result for Indonesian National Police chief Tito Karnavian, photos

Indonesian National Police Chief Tito Karnavian, left, Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa

Indonesian National Police Chief Tito Karnavian, left, Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa, center, and Royal Malaysia Police Inspector General Khalid Abu Bakar link arms together prior to the start of their Trilateral Security Meeting in suburban Pasay city, southeast of Manila, Philippines Thursday, June 22, 2017. The Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia plan to closely cooperate to halt the flow of militants, weapons, funds and extremist propaganda across their borders as they expressed alarm over recent attacks in their countries. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

Indonesian National Police Chief Tito Karnavian, left, Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa, center, and Royal Malaysia Police Inspector General Khalid Abu Bakar link arms together prior to the start of their Trilateral Security Meeting in suburban Pasay city, southeast of Manila, Philippines Thursday, June 22, 2017. The Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia plan to closely cooperate to halt the flow of militants, weapons, funds and extremist propaganda across their borders as they expressed alarm over recent attacks in their countries. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

Human Rights Watch Hammers The Philippines on Police Reinstatements After Murders — HRW says the president’s statement encouraging the killing of drug suspects could be considered “criminal incitement,” police action could be  crimes against humanity.

July 14, 2017

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PNP-Crime Investigation and Detection Group of Region 8 headed by Superintendent Marvin Marcos faces Senate investigation in the killing of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa. STAR/Geremy Pintolo, File

MANILA, Philippines — A human rights watchdog on Friday blasted the reinstatement of police officers accused of involvement in the killing of a former Leyte mayor, saying that such move demonstrated a “kids-gloves” treatment of the cops as it reiterated its call for a United Nations-led probe into mounting killings in relation to the government’s drug war.

Human Rights Watch, a New York-based watchdog, said the “kid-gloves” handling of the officers was emblematic of the impunity given to those accused of killing more than 7,000 people, mostly from urban poor communities, in the government’s conduct of its war on drugs.

The government, however, contradicted this and released data last May showing a lower figure of nearly 4,600 drug-related killings. It added that many of the deaths cited by government critics were classified as still under investigation although up to now no update has been made on their status.

HRW has been critical of the President Rodrigo Duterte’s campaign against narcotics and in March released a report accusing the Philippine leader of inciting the killings of Filipinos accused of involvement in illegal drugs.

The group recently described Duterte’s first year in offices as a “human rights calamity” for the mounting drug war killings and the intimidation of his government’s critics.

On Wednesday, Duterte told the personnel of the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology that he had already ordered the return to service of Superintendent Marvin Marcos and his 18 men who were found to have been involved in the killing of former Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa and his cell mate Raul Yap last year by the Senate and National Bureau of Investigation.

Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

The president said that Marcos should be reactivated as he was not part of the raiding team and was far from the scene of the operations.

This generated a slew of strong reactions especially from senators who investigated the deaths last year.

Sen. Panfilo Lacson, head of the one of the two Senate committees that probed into the incident, could not hide his disgust and spewed an invective to show his frustration with the president’s move.

“In sum, there is a phrase to describe this whole damn thing: Put*ng I*a!” Lacson said.

The return to service of the police personnel followed the downgrade of cases of these cops from murder to homicide.

HRW said that the return to service of the cops was not surprising considering that Duterte vowed in the past that he would even pardon, reinstate and promote them.

“They can call me and say they have been convicted, and I’ll tell the judge to pardon them all,” Duterte was quoted by HRW as saying.

He repeated this promise on Wednesday when he again offered a vigorous defense of security officials involved in the killings. He said that they should not be prosecuted for following his orders.

“Sabi ko, ‘Wala akong pakialam dyan. File na ninyo lahat ng gusto ninyong file.’ Pero sabi ko and in front of Cabinet, ‘I will never allow a military man, a government man or a policeman na makukulong for doing his duty and obeying my order,” the president said, to the applause of most of the members of the audience.

The group debunked the usual police refrain that suspects killed either resisted arrest or were targeted by “unknown gunmen.”

These drug war deaths demand accountability through an investigation of a UN-led panel, the group said.

“Until that occurs, police and their agents implicated in those killings will continue to get away with murder,” the watchdog said.

READ: UN official seeks protection for Callamard amid threats

Based on HRW research, the deaths of suspected drug users and dealers, which Duterte had used to brand his campaign a success, were due to unlawful police conduct which was designed to lend legality to extrajudicial killings which “may amount to crimes against humanity.”

HRW said that the president’s past statement encouraging the killing of drug suspects could be considered “criminal incitement,” warning him and senior government figures that they could be charged with crimes against humanity.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/07/14/1719536/hrw-blasts-reinstatement-marcos-other-cops-espinosa-slay

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Photo taken in November last year shows Supt. Marvin Marcos attending a hearing of the Senate committee on justice and human rights. GEREMY PINTOLO
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Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

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Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

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High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Senator Calls Head of the Philippine National Police a “Slacker”

July 13, 2017
 Gordon calls PNP chief ‘Bato-gan’ for not addressing ‘riding-in-tandem’ slays
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PNP chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa (left) and Senator Richard Gordon. INQUIRER, AP FILE PHOTOS

From “Bato” to “Bato-gan”?

An exasperated Senator Richard Gordon called out Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa for failing to address the riding-in-tandem killings in the country.

“General Bato, fix the killings of people riding on motorcycles. Alagad kayo ng batas, ayusin niyo ang batas hindi ang kabaro niyo,” Gordon said in an interview on Thursday.

Gordon was calling out the police chief for allowing the reinstatement of Supt. Marvin Marcos and 18 other cops involved in the killing of Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr.

The senator said Dela Rosa should have told President Duterte that it would be detrimental to the police force if Marcos would be brought back to service.

If the killings would continue, Gordon said he would call Dela Rosa, who earned monicker “Bato” for his tough image, by the name “Bato-gan” (slacker).

“That must be addressed by General Bato. Babaguhin ko na pangalan ni General Bato, lalagyan ko na ng ‘Gan’ para ‘Batogan,’” Gordon said.

The senator also expressed concern over the killing of a provincial health officer in Cavite, who was gunned down last Tuesday by motorcycle-riding men.

“Ang daming namamatay wala silang ginagawa. They will serve the President and this country better if they do their job,” he said. JE

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/913697/gordon-calls-pnp-chief-bato-gan-for-not-addressing-riding-in-tandem-slays#ixzz4mjK5hlLe
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Philippines: Police Involved in Mayor’s Murder, While in Custody, Reinstated — After President Duterte declared in a speech that he wanted the suspended police official returned to duty

July 13, 2017

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Photo taken in November last year shows Supt. Marvin Marcos attending a hearing of the Senate committee on justice and human rights. GEREMY PINTOLO

MANILA, Philippines – Facing trial for homicide for the killing of a Leyte town mayor last year, Supt. Marvin Marcos is set to go back to active service as chief of the police Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) in Soccsksargen or Region 12.

His being given a new command – as announced by Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa yesterday – came a day after President Duterte declared in a speech that he wanted the suspended police official returned to duty.

“He was reinstated. His case was resolved,” Dela Rosa told reporters in a chance interview on the sidelines of the 25th Defense and Sporting Arms Show in Mandaluyong.

It was not clear which case Dela Rosa was talking about. Marcos and 18 of his men in the CIDG in Eastern Visayas still face criminal charges for two counts of homicide.

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said Marcos may go back to active duty because he had already served his suspension.

“The President respects and abides by the rule of law. Police Superintendent Marcos has served his suspension and is eligible to be back to duty,” Abella said in a statement.

“We leave the matter to the Philippine National Police-Internal Affairs Service (IAS) to explain its decision,” Abella said.

Defending the reinstatement, Dela Rosa said Marcos and his 18 co-defendants in the killing of detained Albuera town mayor Rolando Espinosa and fellow inmate Raul Yap last year had availed themselves of legal remedies under the country’s judicial system.

Dela Rosa added that police officers accused of wrongdoing are as much entitled to due process as ordinary crime suspects.

Marcos’ appointment was effective July 11, but he has yet to report to his new assignment, said Region 12 police director Chief Supt. Cedric Train. The command covers South Cotabato, Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, Sarangani and General Santos City.

“There is already an order but he has yet to report here. He is still at Camp Crame ,” Train said in a phone interview.

Marcos used to head the CIDG-Central Visayas before he and the 18 other police officers were relieved for their role in the killing of Espinosa and Yap in their cells at the Leyte sub-provincial jail before dawn last November.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) earlier downgraded the charges against them from murder to homicide. With the downgrading of the case, Marcos and his men were allowed to post bail.

Dela Rosa said Marcos’ co-accused would also be reassigned to field offices after serving penalties recommended by the PNP-IAS.

He said the penalties include suspension, demotion and admonition. There was no recommendation for dismissal from the service.

“Here comes the decision. Why can’t we accept it?” the PNP chief said, addressing critics.

Dela Rosa challenged Marcos and the other police officers to work hard in their new assignments, “and show they are good policemen.”

Tough assignments

CIDG director Chief Supt. Roel Obusan said Marcos and his companions would be sent to areas where militants like the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters (BIFF) were active.

“Doon sa BIFF and ISIS area,” Obusan told The STAR in a text message when asked where Marcos and the others would be assigned.

Islamic State (IS)-inspired Maute bandits have been fighting government troops in Marawi since May 23. The Maute depredation had prompted Duterte to declare martial law in Mindanao.

“It would be up to the CIDG where to assign him,” Dela Rosa said, referring to Marcos. “He will be back on full duty status so he can be utilized again by the PNP for whatever assignment given to him.”

For his part, National Police Commission (Napolcom) vice chairman Rogelio Casurao said there was nothing wrong with President Duterte declaring his desire to have Marcos reinstated.

At the 26th anniversary of the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology last Wednesday, Duterte said Marcos should be reinstated because he was not part of the team that went to Espinosa’s jail cell.

“Marcos was suspended. He has served his suspension… so I said give back to the man his job. He’s not there anyway,” the President said in Filipino.

“Legally there is nothing wrong,” Casurao said, adding that the President did not directly order his officials to reinstate Marcos and the other policemen.

“So there you are, I hope our fellow Filipinos will understand there is nothing malicious about that from the legal point of view as well as the practical point of view,” Casurao said in a radio interview.

He pointed out that while Marcos and his companions are back in the police service, the Leyte regional trial court would be hearing the homicide case against the policemen.

“While they are working, there is progress in the case against them with the Department of Justice,” he said.

“That’s never the intention,” Casurao said to dispel impression that Marcos and the others were being exonerated. “In the first place, they are still in the service, they’re getting salaries doing nothing,” he said.

“At present there is nothing irregular about that, there’s still a trial in Leyte. What’s not good is if they’re exonerated of homicide even if there’s pending trial,” he said.

He also pointed out that President Duterte as chief executive has the prerogative to issue directives within the executive department.

“While it is the prerogative of the President to do that, remember the DOJ, the PNP and the Napolcom – these are all part of the executive department and only the President has final say on this,” he added.

He also urged the public not to make the situation more complicated by jumping to conclusions.

“Let’s try to help ease the situation and the problem of our government. We have so many problems because of the Marawi incident – let’s not make them worse by making wrong speculations,” he said.

Casurao said while the Senate may have found in the killing of Espinosa a case of murder, the DOJ has spoken and ruled that it was homicide.

“If there are findings concerning legal liability of murder, Senate can investigate the case in aid of legislation,” he said. – With Cecille Suerte Felipe, Alexis Romero

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/07/14/1719384/cidgs-marcos-returns-duty-region-12

Photos on obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

No automatic alt text available.

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP