Posts Tagged ‘tablets’

Proof The Distraction of Electronic Devices Means You Aren’t Paying Attention: College Students Checking Phones During Class Have Lower Grades

January 11, 2019

While reading President Trump’s latest tweets may seem like a much better alternative than listening to liberal college professors drone on about politics, a new study suggests that constantly checking your phone during class could come back to haunt you during exam time.

According to a new study in Educational Psychology, students in college classes that are allowed access to electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets that include nonacademic vices such as Facebook or Twitter tend to perform at a lower academic standard compared to classmates attending lectures where such devices were banned.

Image result for using electronic devices inschool, pictures

In the study, researchers at Rutgers University compared two separate classroom environments for learning: one class allowed tablets and cellphones for student usage, while another class banned the use of electronics entirely during lecture.

In their findings, researchers noted that students enrolled in the class that allowed smartphones and tablets to be used that admitted to using them during class performed approximately 5 percent lower (roughly half a letter grade) on the end of term final examination when compared to the population of students in the class that banned electronics.

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It is also worth noting that students enrolled in the smartphone/tablet-friendly class who did not report using the devices during class performed better than their peers who chose to use the devices, but still did not perform as well as their peers in the class where electronics were banned, suggesting that such devices likely create a disruptive classroom environment that is detrimental to everyone’s grade, not just those who use devices.

The main author of the study, Arnold Glass, noted that while the usage of the devices were most detrimental to the grades of those individuals who were using the devices, the lack of rules banning their use almost certainly impact the information retention of all individuals enrolled in the class.

“These findings should alert the many dedicated students and instructors that dividing attention is having an insidious effect that is impairing their exam performance and final grade,” said Glass. “To help manage the use of devices in the classroom, teachers should explain to students the damaging effect of distractions on retention — not only for themselves, but for the whole class.”

John Patrick (@john_pat_rick) is a graduate of Canisius College and Georgia Southern University. He interned for Red Alert Politics during the summer of 2012 and has continued to contribute regularly.

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Tech Giants Race to Address Widespread Chip Flaws

January 4, 2018

Spectre and Meltdown, long-time design bugs, could make many devices vulnerable to hack

The world’s computer-chip and software makers scrambled to respond to the discovery of two widespread hardware vulnerabilities disclosed by cybersecurity experts that could affect most of the world’s modern computing devices.

Tech manufacturers and researchers described the two vulnerabilities as design flaws, long present in most modern chips. The bugs, dubbed Spectre and Meltdown, make data stored in the working memory of shared servers and individual devices—including personal computers, tablets and smartphones—vulnerable to attack.

The flaws could allow hackers to access and steal data from devices or servers. To take advantage of either bug, however, a hacker must run malicious software on the central processing unit—essentially the brains of any modern computing device—of the machine they are targeting.

Companies and several government cybersecurity agencies said there was no indication so far of reports of any significant breaches related to the two flaws.

Still, because of the widespread nature of the flaws, Intel Corp. , Microsoft Corp. , Amazon.com Inc., Alphabet Inc. -owned Google and others moved quickly to explain the nature of the bugs and what they have done to minimize the threat, including rolling out software fixes. Some patches, however, could slow down computers, security experts warned, though it was unclear Thursday whether they were causing any major disruptions.

Intel’s corporate offices are seen in Santa Clara, Calif. Intel says it is working to patch a security vulnerability in its products.Photo: Ben Margot/Associated Press

The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team, a cybersecurity center that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, said late Wednesday that it was aware of the two bugs. It encouraged system administrators to contact software vendors for ways to patch them. CERT said it wasn’t aware of any “active exploitation” of the bugs.

A spokesperson for the National Cyber Security Centre, an arm of the U.K.’s intelligence agency, said it wasn’t aware of evidence of “malicious exploitation” of the flaws. “The NCSC advises that all organizations and home users continue to protect their systems from threats by installing patches as soon as they become available.”

Google said its researchers had identified the flaws and had planned to disclose them—as well as what it has done to fix them—later this month. But it moved up action after the bugs were widely disclosed Wednesday. Often firms and researchers working to protect systems from hacks hold off on disclosing bugs widely to minimize the risk that potential hackers could exploit them.

Google said it had mitigated the vulnerabilities in many of its own products at risk. For instance, it said users of its Android operating system who have installed the latest security fixes didn’t need to do anything else. Users of Google’s Chrome browser, however, were asked to take specific action in some cases to protect their systems.

Google said it had also patched its cloud platform that it leases to businesses. But it said that its cloud customers must implement the patch within their own systems.

Amazon said it had notified its web-services customers that it was patching its data centers. The company said that customers need to patch the operating systems they are running on top of Amazon’s infrastructure. Microsoft said it has “been working closely with chip manufacturers to develop and test mitigations to protect our customers.”

The two flaws could affect practically every computer on the globe running a modern central-processing unit, or CPU, according to researchers that first identified them. They pose a particular danger for shared machines that have many users—such as those in data centers used for cloud computing—because they could allow one user to grab sensitive data belonging to another user, such as passwords or encryption keys.

They take advantage of tricks that modern chips use to speed up their performance, where chips perform calculations out of order, or guess what calculations they will have to do, rather than waiting for all the information they need to complete each step in order. Researchers showed that hackers could use those speculative, or out of order, instructions to trick chips into revealing sensitive data elsewhere in the processor’s memory.

The bug called Meltdown allows software to jump over protections that would normally restrict access to a device’s memory, giving hackers access to core functions of the machine as well as data from other users. Researchers say that bug is easier to patch than Spectre, although the patch could slow the performance of the machines that use it.

In a conference call late Wednesday, Intel’s general manager of data center engineering, Stephen Smith, said any potential exploit “is really not the result of product erratum. The processors are really operating as they should operate, as they were designed to operate and validated to operate.”

He said software patches can help mitigate the flaw, and that Intel launched an industrywide collaboration to incorporate a fix in the hardware.

There are existing patches against Meltdown for Microsoft’s Windows, Apple Inc.’s Mac OS and Linux, a family of open-source operating systems. But it is up to companies, such as cloud providers, to apply them.

In the case of Spectre, the flaw is so deeply embedded in the way modern chips are designed that while some patches can stop known exploits, fully fixing it will require redesigning computer chips and then replacing those currently in use, according to a federally funded cybersecurity center at Carnegie Mellon University.

Spectre appears to affects chips designed or made by Intel, Advanced Micro Devices Inc. and SoftBank Group Corp. -owned ARM, a British-based chip designer.

An ARM spokesman said the majority of its processors weren’t impacted, and those affected were certain high-end chips. The spokesman said ARM was working with Intel and AMD to patch the possible hacking method, “which is not an architectural flaw or a bug.” In the worst-case scenario, a hacker could access “small pieces of data.”

AMD said in a statement that software patches resolved one of the vulnerabilities with “negligible impact expected,” while the differences in the way AMD chips are designed means “there is a near zero risk” they are vulnerable to the other attacking methods.

Write to Sam Schechner at sam.schechner@wsj.com and Stu Woo at Stu.Woo@wsj.com

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North Korea allows smartphones in ‘Orwellian’ move to monitor citizens and bolster power

December 7, 2017
  
NORTH Korea has allowed more access to smartphones in an “innovative Orwellian move” to “keep tabs” on the population and bolster the regime’s powers, it has been revealed.

 

Mobile phones are becoming commonplace in North Korea and are seen as status symbols.

But, access to the internet is limited and people are being employed by the regime to monitor people round the clock.

Director of strategic threat development at Recorded Future, Priscilla Moriuchi, said: “In an Orwellian sense, North Korea is innovating on surveillance.”

Nearly all North Korean phones, tablets, laptops and computers run on locally developed operating systems stocked with censorship and surveillance tools.

GETTY

Mobile phones are becoming commonplace in North Korea and are seen as status symbolsInternet from the outside world is cut off, according to researchers and groups that work with defectors.

Computers either run a system called Red Star or a localised version of Microsoft Windows whereas smartphones and tablets run on localised versions of Android.

The operating systems direct users to curated intranet loaded with Kim Jong-un speeches and recipes to North Korean dishes.

Ms Moriuchi added that by mandating that certain technologies be installed on mobile devices, North Korea could be “establishing a playbook for other authoritarian regimes”.

The Red Star system and the preloaded surveillance software allow Pyongyang to monitor behaviour, according to German researcher Florian Grunow.

Authorities can use the software to remotely delete files from a computer and can block users sharing files, according to Ms Grunow.

A tool called TraceViewer records app usage and intranet browsing history.

The software takes random screenshots which users can see but cannot delete.

Phone usage is monitored and smartphone users face random stops by police, who check their phones’ contents, according to defectors.

North Korea’s intranet first became widely available in the early 2000s.

But, in 2004 a suspected assassination attempt on then-leader Kim Jong Il, allegedly triggered by a wireless handset, led to a five-year ban on mobile phones.

The regime began allowing the devices again in 2009.

Some experts attribute the concession to Pyongyang’s desire to endear the government to local citizens.

A researcher at Amnesty International, Arnold Fang said: “North Koreans aren’t completely oblivious to the outside world.

GETTY

A tool called TraceViewer records app usage and intranet browsing history“In order to keep people happy, the North Korean government needs to show they are living a life of quality that is comparable to neighbouring countries.”

Early devices allowed some defectors to smuggle TV dramas from South Korea or elsewhere, but newer devices with tighter monitoring have made it more difficult to get access to foreign media, according to defectors.

An extremely small number of the North Korean elite have access to the external internet, according to Ms Moriuchi.

They are mainly researchers, government officials and party members whose jobs require information from the outside world.

GETTY

An extremely small number of North Korean elite have access to external internetThe elites gain access via a connection ultimately run by China Unicom, operational since 2010.

But, according to North Korea-focused blog 38 North, there is a second internet connection provided by a Russian state-owned company, TransTeleCom.

Pyongyang’s traditional tools of power, such as propaganda and ruling by terror, are beginning to diminish in effectiveness, former North Korean diplomat Thae Yong Ho said.

But some experts said they doubt smartphones and online activity will do anything but strengthen the regime.

Head of intelligence research at Cybereason, a cybersecurity firm, and a former U.S. Department of Defence analyst, Ross Rustici, said: “As long as North Koreans primarily consume the propaganda from the state, I don’t see it having a short-term destabilising effect.”

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/889170/North-Korea-Orwellian-smartphones-surveillance-Kim-Jong-un-Pyongyang-elite-news-latest

EU demands talks with US over possible airline laptop ban

May 12, 2017

AFP

© GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA/AFP/File | In March, Washington banned passengers on direct flights to the United States from 10 airports in eight countries from carrying on board laptop computers, tablets and other electronic devices larger than cellphones

BRUSSELS (AFP) – 

The EU is seeking urgent talks with Washington over a possible US ban on carry-on computers on European flights to the United States, an EU source said Friday.

The European Union has not yet received a response from Washington to its request, the source said.

The US Department of Homeland Security said on Tuesday it was close to a decision on extending to Europe an existing ban imposed on eight countries, as the busy summer transatlantic travel season looms.

Airlines flying to the United States from European airports that would be involved in implementing the policy have been given a warning that it is under consideration, the department said.

A spokesman for the European Commission said that “the United States and the European Union have a long-standing and fruitful cooperation on security” and the commission had approached the US “to continue to pursue that cooperation”.

In March, Washington banned passengers on direct flights to the United States from 10 airports in eight countries from carrying on board laptop computers, tablets and other electronic devices larger than cellphones.

The affected airports are in Turkey, North Africa and the Middle East.

Britain followed with a similar ban applying to incoming flights from six Middle East and North African countries.

The move, which forces passengers to put their devices into checked baggage, came as counter-terror officials developed concerns that jihadist groups were devising bombs disguised as batteries in consumer electronics.

A bomb that blew a hole in the fuselage of a Somalian airline in February 2016, killing one person, is believed to have been built into a laptop computer carried into the passenger cabin.

Emirates Airline Cuts Flights to U.S. — Revenues Down Due To In-Flight Laptop Ban — “Deterioration in the booking profiles on all our U.S. routes”

April 19, 2017

Airline will reduce flights to Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Seattle, Boston and Los Angeles

Emirates Airline’s inaugural flight from Dubai to Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport lands on Dec. 15, 2016.

Emirates Airline’s inaugural flight from Dubai to Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport lands on Dec. 15, 2016. PHOTO: JESUS ARANGUREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Emirates Airline, the world’s biggest carrier by international traffic, is cutting flights to five U.S. cities after actions by the Trump administration slowed bookings from Middle Eastern countries.

The Dubai-based carrier’s action is the clearest sign of the commercial impact of President Donald Trump’s efforts to curtail immigration from several Muslim-majority countries and limit the use of electronics on some U, S, bound flights.

“Over the past three months, we have seen a significant deterioration in the booking profiles on all our U.S. routes, across travel segments,” the airline said. “Emirates has therefore responded as any profit-oriented enterprise would and we will redeploy capacity to serve demand on other routes on our global network.”

Citing terrorism threats, the U.S. banned passengers in March from carrying large electronic devices, including laptops and tablets, in cabins on direct flights from several Middle Eastern countries, including the United Arab Emirates.

U.S. officials banned passengers from carrying most electronics larger than a cellphone into the cabin on direct flights from eight countries in the Middle East and North Africa. Photo: Emirates Airline

Emirates’ reduction in flights is set to take effect from May, the airline told its business partners Wednesday, according to a notice seen by The Wall Street Journal.

Even before the electronics ban, Emirates had to contend with executive orders from Mr. Trump that blocked the entry of nationals from several Muslim-majority countries. Those orders were blocked by U.S. courts.

“The recent actions taken by the U.S. government relating to the issuance of entry visas, heightened security vetting and restrictions on electronic devices in aircraft cabins have had a direct impact on consumer interest and demand for air travel into the U.S.,” the company said.

Emirates President Tim Clark said early last month that the travel ban almost instantaneously led to a 35% decline in the pace of bookings on the 12 U.S. routes the airline serves. Mr. Clark said at the time that while the pace had started to recover, it wasn’t clear when things would go back to normal. The electronics ban soon followed.

The restrictions aren’t limited to Emirates and its nearest rivals, but has hit them particularly hard. The airline links many of the countries affected by the visa ban to the U.S. via their Middle Eastern hubs where rivals don’t offer service.

The electronics ban has also had an outsize effect on the Persian Gulf carriers because transfer passengers from Asia headed to the U.S. on flights of 12 hours or more can avoid the ban by flying through hubs in continental Europe.

Emirates’ flights from Dubai to Fort Lauderdale and Orlando are set to move from daily to five times a week in May. In early June, the airline plans to reduce flights to Seattle and Boston to once a day from twice a day and it will make a similar reduction to flights to Los Angeles in July.

The company said it would continue to serve its 12 destinations and hoped to reinstate and grow U.S. operations as soon as doing so was commercially viable.

Mr. Trump’s restrictions and the ensuing slowdown have prompted speculation among some Middle Eastern officials and airline industry observers that the administration is trying to shield U.S. carriers from competition by putting obstacles in front of Middle Eastern counterparts’ expansion in the U.S.

Some U.S. carriers have complained in recent years about the growth of a trio of airlines that includes Emirates, Abu Dhabi-based Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways. They accuse the state-owned Persian Gulf airlines of being subsidized by the state and urged the Trump administration to curb their growth. The Middle Eastern carriers deny that they are subsidized. The Trump administration hasn’t weighed in on the accusation.

The Mideast carriers themselves haven’t accused the U.S. government of implementing the policies for protectionist reasons. The Trump administration has said its moves were motivated by security concerns.

These challenges add to financial woes at Emirates and other Mideast carriers. They have faced a slowdown in sales because of a slump in oil and gas prices that has depressed premium bookings.

In its latest set of financial results, which covered the six-month period from April through September of last year, Emirates said its net profit fell 75% compared with the same period the previous year to $214 million. It cited unfavorable currency moves, competition over fares and slowing demand.

The Trump administration’s impact on Emirates and other competitors is being closely watched in the Middle East. For Dubai, a trade and tourism hub, the airline is a crucial economic lifeline.

A spokesman for Etihad Airways in nearby Abu Dhabi said the company had no plans to reduce flights to the U.S., noting that it planned to add capacity to one of its American routes this summer. Qatar Airways didn’t respond to a request for comment about its plans.

Write to Asa Fitch at asa.fitch@wsj.com and Robert Wall at robert.wall@wsj.com

https://www.wsj.com/articles/emirates-cuts-flights-to-u-s-following-electronics-ban-visa-restrictions-1492610648?mod=e2tw

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Image result for Qatar Airways, photos

CEO of Qatar Airways Akbar Al Baker. (AFP/Getty Images)

“We are buying American aeroplanes in big numbers and we are providing jobs. Every single flight we do brings economic benefits to the U.S. So to us, America is first.”

Is Trump wise to take on China over trade? — Brookings Institution — “China has been taking out massive amounts of money & wealth from the US in totally one-sided trade.”

April 5, 2017

BBC News

US President Donald Trump has said that trade negotiations with China will be “very difficult” when he meets President Xi Jinping in Mar-a-Lago, Florida, on Thursday.

Trade will be one of two key issues on the agenda, along with North Korea. But what’s the problem – and what can Trump do about it?

Buying Chinese

The problem with the US-China trade relationship is that it is highly unequal and has been for a long time.

In 2016 alone, the US imported $480bn (£385bn) of goods and services from China – mostly consumer items like clothing, shoes, televisions, smartphones, laptops and tablets.

Those imports keep prices low for American consumers.

In return, the US sold just $170bn (£137bn) worth of exports to China – including sophisticated machinery like aircraft and agricultural products like soybeans.

It also makes money from services, like the education of an estimated 350,000 Chinese students in the US.

Overall, China is the largest source of the US trade deficit – the amount by which the value of its imports exceeds the value of its exports. In 2016 it accounted for about 60% of its overall deficit of $500bn (402bn).Grey line

Read more on this story:

The meeting takes place at Mar-a-Lago in Florida – a private members club as well as the Trump family’s winter getaway
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The loss of American jobs

President Trump is unhappy with this state of affairs, tweeting in January: “China has been taking out massive amounts of money & wealth from the US in totally one-sided trade.”

He sees a link with the loss of manufacturing jobs – and he has a point, because a large trade deficit generally goes hand-in-hand with a smaller manufacturing sector.

This is a problem, because for people without college degrees these jobs tend to be well-paying ones.

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.Shoppers on escalatorsUS shoppers have enjoyed years of cheap imports. Reuters photo

During his campaign, Mr Trump spoke often of wanting to bring manufacturing jobs back to the US and, in the first presidential debate, said: “They’re using our country as a piggy bank to rebuild China.

After China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001 there was a surge of Chinese imports into the US, something economists called the “China shock”.

Between 2000 and 2007, US manufacturing jobs fell sharply, from 16.9 million to 13.6 million. The 2008 financial crisis pushed the number lower, to 11.2 million, although the number has since been fairly stable.

Workers making clothing and electronic goods were among the worst affected.

It is difficult to settle upon an exact figure, but some economists think that 40% of these job losses can be linked to Chinese imports.

However, the influx of cheap goods also created non-manufacturing jobs in the US, because consumers had more money to spend on other things.

That boosted healthcare, entertainment, travel, and leisure. So, think of the trade deficit destroying some jobs and creating others.

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Open the gates

So, what can President Trump do about the trade deficit?

Candidate Trump threatened harsh protectionist measures, such as a 45% tariff on Chinese imports, but history shows that protectionism does not reduce trade deficits.

He also threatened to name China a “currency manipulator” and at one point during his campaign went so far as to accuse it of “raping” the US with its trade policy.

For years China intervened to keep its exchange rate low, which kept the price of its goods down and helped increase the US deficit. But more recently its central bank has kept the currency high – making its exports more expensive – and it is in the US’s interest to encourage more of this.

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.Port of Los AngelesThe US has long been spending more on goods from other countries than it sells. GETTY IMAGES

The most promising route for President Trump is to negotiate better access to Chinese consumers.

China has many restrictions on imports, for example a 25% tariff on cars. And while the US sells a lot of agricultural products to China, notably soy beans, key markets like beef and pork are highly restricted.

Probably most important for the US is that modern service sectors like finance, social media, telecommunications, health care and transportation are largely closed to imports and foreign investment.

So far there has been little progress, but opening China’s markets would offer more choice to its own consumers and would help maintain a stable relationship with the US.

China’s economy depends on keeping the trade flowing with its biggest customer.

Low expectations

Will there be a trade war?

Probably not, because protectionist measures would hurt the US economy and the Chinese are counting on it to be practical.

The Chinese Communist Party has an important congress at the end of the year and it will be difficult for Xi to do anything bold before then.

Even afterwards, China is likely to move very gradually on market opening.

Trump was smart to set low expectations for the summit.

David Dollar is a senior fellow in the John L Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution, a public policy organisation based in Washington DC.

Twitter: @davidrdollar and @BrookingsInst

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39479751

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Germany says has no plans to restrict electronics on some flights

March 22, 2017

Reuters

Germany said on Wednesday it has no plans to introduce restrictions on carry-on electronic devices on planes coming from some Muslim-majority countries in the Middle East and North Africa, as the United States and Britain have announced.

A spokesman for the Interior Ministry said the government had been informed about the U.S. measures.

“German airports are not affected by the measures. Comparable rules are not planned in Germany at the moment,” said the spokesman.

(Reporting by Michael Nienaber; Writing by Madeline Chambers; Editing by Alison Williams)

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Laptop ban on flights ‘is based on intelligence about an ISIS plot to target the West gathered during the raid on Yemen which killed Navy SEAL’

March 22, 2017

No automatic alt text available.

A hole was blown in the side of a plane last year caused by an explosive-filled laptop CREDIT: AP

  • The intelligence centered around al-Qaeda’s ‘successful development’ of compact battery bombs that fit inside laptops or other devices, sources claimed
  • Bombs would reportedly be manually triggered which explains cabin luggage ban
  • The US and the UK have instituted similar bans on large electronics in carry-on bags for direct flights from certain Middle East and North African nations
  • The US ban applies to 10 airports in Morocco, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Kuwait, Qatar, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates 
  • Britain’s restrictions apply to flights originating from the countries of Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia 
  • Electronics cellphone sized and small will still be permitted in passenger cabins 
  • Restrictions come a year after the bombing of Daallo Flight 159, in which a bomber used an explosive hidden inside a laptop  

The ban of carry-on electronics on flights was prompted by intelligence gathered about an ISIS plot to target the West, it has been reported.

The threat was judged by the US to be ‘substantiated’ and ‘credible’.

The US and UK announced restrictions on large electronics in carry-on baggage for direct flights from certain Middle Eastern and North African nations on Tuesday.

The move is allegedly based on the suspicion that Islamic State are working on ways to smuggle explosives on to planes by hiding them in electronics.

Crucial information was apparently gathered during a raid against Al Qaeda in Yemen in January that killed Navy SEAL ‘Ryan’ Owens.

The intelligence centred around al Qaeda’s ‘successful development’ of compact battery bombs that fit inside laptops or other devices, sources claimed.

The ban of carry-on electronics on flights was reportedly prompted by intelligence gathered about an ISIS plot to target the West. Above, the airports and countries targeted by the new American and British policies

The ban of carry-on electronics on flights was reportedly prompted by intelligence gathered about an ISIS plot to target the West. Above, the airports and countries targeted by the new American and British policies

The battery bombs would need to be manually triggered which is why the electronics ban is only for cabin luggage not baggage that is checked in, a source told the Daily Beast.

Al Qaeda’s head bomb maker in the Arabian Peninsula, Ibrahim al-Asiri, has been working on hiding bombs in even smaller devices, the source added.

Lithium batteries ignited and destroyed UPS Flight 6 in September 2010, killing two crew members when it crashed near Dubai – providing inspiration for the terrorist group

The tip-off was deemed to be ‘substantiated’ and ‘credible’ by the US.

Two attacks on flights in the last two years were cited by the US Department of Homeland Security – the crash of a Russian jet over the Egyptian Sinai in October 2015 and a failed attempt to bring down a jet that had taken off from Mogadishu, Somalia last year.

Airlines flying from the 10 mentioned airports will have four days to implement the new ban on carry on electronics including laptops, iPads and cameras. Above, a stock image of a laptop

Airlines flying from the 10 mentioned airports will have four days to implement the new ban on carry on electronics including laptops, iPads and cameras. Above, a stock image of a laptop

The intelligence centred around al Qaeda's 'successful development' of compact battery bombs that fit inside laptops or other devices, sources claimed. Lithium batteries ignited and destroyed UPS Flight 6 in September 2010, killing two crew members when it crashed (pictured) near Dubai - providing inspiration for the terrorist group 

The intelligence centred around al Qaeda’s ‘successful development’ of compact battery bombs that fit inside laptops or other devices, sources claimed. Lithium batteries ignited and destroyed UPS Flight 6 in September 2010, killing two crew members when it crashed (pictured) near Dubai – providing inspiration for the terrorist group

The jet made an emergency landing after insurgent group Al-Shababb reportedly got a laptop onboard the flight that had been rigged as a bomb and tore apart its cabin.

‘Since they weren’t high enough, the explosion wasn’t catastrophic to the plane and they were able to land,’ one source told The Daily Beast. ‘The bomber got sucked out of the hole, but it was proof of concept.’

Eric Swalwell, a Democratic member of the House Intelligence Committee, told ABC News there was ‘a new aviation threat’.

‘We know that our adversaries, terrorist groups in the United States and outside the United States, seek to bring down a US-bound airliner,’ he said.

‘That’s one of their highest value targets. And we’re doing everything we can right now to prevent that from happening.’

The countries included in the ban were selected due to their exposure to Al Qaeda groups and members who might try to bring a battery bomb on a plane heading for the US, a third source claimed.

Meanwhile, ABC reports claimed the airports affected by the ban were not directly named in the most recent threat intelligence gathered by authorities.

Information was gathered during a raid against al Qaeda in Yemen in January that killed Navy SEAL senior chief petty officer William 'Ryan' Owens (pictured)

Information was gathered during a raid against al Qaeda in Yemen in January that killed Navy SEAL senior chief petty officer William ‘Ryan’ Owens (pictured)

They claimed the list was based on intelligence analysis paired with other government information.

The US names more countries in its list, applying the new restrictions on flights coming from international airports in Amman, Jordan; Kuwait City, Kuwait; Cairo,Egypt; Istanbul, Turkey; Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Casablanca, Morocco; Doha, Qatar; and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.

The UK ban applies more simply to incoming flights from Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia.

America’s Department of Homeland Security was the first to announce the decision, saying that passengers on airlines flying directly to the US from 10 airports in eight countries will soon only be allowed to bring cellphones on board with them.

Other electronics, including laptops and tablets, will be indefinitely banned from the passenger cabin, and must be checked in checked baggage if they are brought on the plane at all.

The new restrictions are based on ‘evaluated intelligence’ that terrorist groups are working on ‘innovative methods’ for attacks. Officials didn’t elaborate on the intelligence but CNN reports that Al Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula (AQAP) is specifically the cause for the changes.

The British government added legitimacy to the concerns by following through with their similar ban.

The British and American bans differ in which countries they target, how they are implemented and their definition of a large electronic.

When asked by the BBC why the US list of nations differs from the UK’s, a spokesman for Prime Minister Theresa May said: ‘We have each taken our own decisions.’

THE ELECTRONICS BAN: DIFFERENCES IN THE AMERICAN AND BRITISH RESTRICTIONS

US BOUND FLIGHTS 

Carry-on OK: Cellphones and any electronic smaller than a cellphone

Will need to be checked: Laptops, tablets, e-readers, cameras, portable DVD players, electronic game units larger than a smartphone and tavel printers/scanners

Timeline: Airlines will have four days to implement the new security order or face being barred from flying to the United States

 AIRPORTS

  • Mohammed V. Int’l – Casablanca, Morocco
  • Ataturk Int’l – Istanbul, Turkey
  • Queen Alia Int’l – Amman, Jordan
  • Cairo Int’l – Cairo, Egypt
  • King Abdulaziz Int’l – Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • King Khalid Int’l – Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Abu Dhabi Int’l – Abu Dhabi, UAE
  • Dubai Int’l – Dubai, UAE
  • Kuwait Int’l – Kuwait City, Kuwait
  • Hamad Int’l – Doha, Qatar

 AIRLINES

  • Royal Jordanian
  • Egyptair
  • Turkish Airlines
  • Saudi Arabian Airlines
  • Kuwait Airways
  • Royal Air Maroc
  • Qatar Airways
  • Emirates Air
  • Ethiad Airways

UK BOUND FLIGHTS

Carry-on OK:  Electronics smaller 16cm long by 9.3cm wide by 1.5cm deep

Will need to be checked: Any electronic larger than that size

Timeline: Airlines will be allowed to implement the new rules at their leisure

 COUNTRIES

  • Turkey
  • Lebanon
  • Jordan
  • Egypt
  • Tunisia
  • Saudi Arabia

 AIRLINES 

  • British Airways
  • EasyJet
  • Jet2.com
  • Monarch
  • Thomas Cook
  • Thomson

American officials have given the airlines four days to implement the security order or face being barred from flying to the United States, while in Britain the airlines are being allowed to implement the new measures at their leisure.

The American ban also applies to all electronics larger than a cellphone while the British ban gives the specific measurements of any electronic larger than 16cm long, 9.3cm wide and 1.5cm deep.

About 50 flights a day, all on foreign carriers, will be impacted in the US. Officials said no US-based airlines have non-stop flights from those cities to the United States, so they will not be impacted.

The officials said the decision was prompted by ‘evaluated intelligence’ about ongoing potential threats to airplanes bound for the United States. The officials would not discuss the timing of the intelligence or if any particular terror group is thought to be planning an attack.

CNN, citing an unnamed .S official, said the ban on electronics on certain airlines was related to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and that some information came from a recent .S special forces raid in Yemen. The group has planned several foiled bombing attempts on Western-bound airlines.

At the daily White House press briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer said that ‘elevated intelligence’ about international terrorism led the US to make the chance.

Spicer, who was reading aloud from a Department of Homeland Security statement, did not explain what made the intelligence assessment ‘elevated.’ But a different White House spokesman told DailyMail.com after Spicer’s daily briefing that he meant to cite ‘evaluated’ intelligence.

That wording matched a statement that DHS issued earlier in the day.

‘Evaluated intelligence indicates that terrorist groups continue to target commercial aviation and are aggressively pursuing innovative methods to undertake their attacks, to include smuggling explosive devices in various consumer items,’ the agency said.

At the daily White House press briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer (pictured) said that 'elevated intelligence' about international terrorism led the US to make the chance

At the daily White House press briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer (pictured) said that ‘elevated intelligence’ about international terrorism led the US to make the chance

‘Based on this information, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly and Transportation Security Administration Acting Administrator Huban Gowadia have determined it is necessary to enhance security procedures for passengers at certain last point of departure airports to the United States.’

Spicer punted further questions to the Transportation Security Administration.

The new carry on restrictions come a little more than a year after the bombing of Daallo Airlines Flight 159, a flight from Somalia to Djibouti.

The bombing took out a piece of the plane a little more than a row, but only resulted in the death of the bomber and two other injuries. It was believed that the bomb was rigged to a timer device on the bomber’s laptop.

The flight had been delayed by 20 minutes, so it was believed that the timing of the bomb was premature and may have been intended to occur about halfway through the flight.

Since it occurred earlier though, the plane was not yet at its cruising altitude which would have been more dangerous. The pilots were able to land the jet safely.

The ban would affect laptops, iPads, cameras and most other electronics. Royal Jordanian Airlines tweeted about the ban Monday, telling passengers that medical devices would be allowed onboard with passengers.

Details of the ban were first disclosed by Royal Jordanian and the official news agency of Saudi Arabia.

In its statement, Royal Jordanian said the electronics ban would affect its flights to New York, Chicago, Detroit and Montreal.

Brian Jenkins, an aviation-security expert at the Rand Corp., said the nature of the security measure suggested that it was driven by intelligence of a possible attack. There could be concern about inadequate passenger screening or even conspiracies involving insiders – airport or airline employees – in some countries, he said.

The new carry on restrictions come a little more than a year after the bombing of Daallo Airlines Flight 159, a flight from Somalia to Djibouti. The bombing took out a piece of the plane a little more than a row, but only resulted in the death of the bomber and two other injuries

The new carry on restrictions come a little more than a year after the bombing of Daallo Airlines Flight 159, a flight from Somalia to Djibouti. The bombing took out a piece of the plane a little more than a row, but only resulted in the death of the bomber and two other injuries

It was believed that the bomb was rigged to a timer device on the bomber's laptop

It was believed that the bomb was rigged to a timer device on the bomber’s laptop

Terrifying footage: On board the Somalian bomb horror jet

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly phoned lawmakers over the weekend to brief them on aviation security issues that have prompted the impending electronics ban, according a congressional aide briefed on the discussion. The aide was not authorized to speak publicly about the issue and spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The administration officials who briefed reporters about the ban said foreign officials were told about the impending order starting Sunday.

A US government official said such a ban has been considered for several weeks. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity to disclose the internal security discussions by the federal government.

The ban would begin just before Wednesday’s meeting of the US-led coalition against the Islamic State group in Washington. A number of top Arab officials were expected to attend the State Department gathering. It was unclear whether their travel plans were related to any increased worry about security threats.

Another aviation-security expert, Jeffrey Price, said there could be downsides to the policy.

‘There would be a huge disadvantage to having everyone put their electronics in checked baggage,’ said Price, a professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver. He said thefts from baggage would skyrocket, as when Britain tried a similar ban in 2006, and some laptops have batteries that can catch fire – an event easier to detect in the cabin than the hold.

Most major airports in the United States have a computer tomography or CT scanner for checked baggage, which creates a detailed picture of a bag’s contents. They can warn an operator of potentially dangerous material, and may provide better security than the X-ray machines used to screen passengers and their carry-on bags. All checked baggage must be screened for explosives.

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