Posts Tagged ‘tax cuts’

Dems mull whether Warren is the one to take on Trump

July 10, 2018

Can Elizabeth Warren win back blue-collar Democrats from President Trump in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania?

It’s a question many Democrats are pondering as Warren — one of the leading contenders for her party’s presidential nomination, if she chooses to run in 2020 — goes back and forth with the president over immigration and other issues.

Image result for Elizabeth Warren, photos

Warren (D-Mass.) has shown an ability to rally and excite progressives, she’s a proven fundraiser and she has policy bona fides from her work in the Senate.Yet there are creeping doubts among some Democrats that she’s the best candidate to take on Trump.

Some worry the former Harvard professor will have a tough time winning back the Rust Belt centrists and independents who abandoned Hillary Clinton and Democrats for Trump.

“I just can’t see a blue-collar, Rust Belt guy voting for her,” said one Democratic strategist who has worked on presidential campaigns. “I think the party needs to be realistic about that.”

Some Democrats almost certainly remain shellshocked from the last election after Trump’s surprise win. He became the first Republican to win the states of Pennsylvania and Michigan in a presidential election since 1988 and the first Republican to win Wisconsin since President Reagan in 1984.

If Democrats don’t retake those states in 2020, their chances of winning the Electoral College will fall.

Teeth-gnashing over who is best-positioned to take on Trump, as a result, is already taking place ahead of the midterm elections.

Warren’s gender and her political identity as a voice on the left are both likely to be issues for primary voters sizing up Democratic candidates in potential head-to-head matchups with Trump. Would she be stronger than former Vice President Joe Biden? What about Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)? Does the party need the face of a new political generation, such as Sens. Kamala Harris (Calif.), Cory Booker (N.J.) or Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.)?

Warren has her advocates, who say the senator’s anti-corporate economic message will resonate with the types of voters who left the party for Trump.

Jesse Ferguson, who served as a spokesman for Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign, said Warren “has a powerful economic message that resonates everywhere.”

Democratic pollster Celinda Lake said Warren is the perfect candidate to oppose Trump because she “has the ability to go straight at him on his economic policies.”

She also argued that Trump’s repeated attacks on Warren suggest the White House sees her as a threat.

“I think this man understands his brand very well and understands his populist appeal very, very well, and he realizes how threatening to him she is on his brand,” Lake said.

Warren’s office declined to comment for this story.

Trump mocked Warren over her Native American heritage twice last week, once on Twitter but also at a campaign-style rally.

“Let’s say I’m debating Pocahontas. You know those little [DNA] kits they sell on television for two dollars? … I’m going to get one of those little kits and in the middle of the debate when she proclaims that she’s of Indian heritage, because her mother says she has high cheekbones,” Trump said to the cheering crowd in Montana.

“We will take that little kit … but we have to do it gently because we are in the ‘Me Too’ generation,” Trump said, adding that he would donate $1 million to Warren’s favorite charity if she took the DNA test. “I have a feeling she will say no.”

Warren immediately hit Trump back on Twitter.

“Hey, @realDonaldTrump: While you obsess over my genes, your Admin is conducting DNA tests on little kids because you ripped them from their mamas & you are too incompetent to reunite them in time to meet a court order. Maybe you should focus on fixing the lives you’re destroying,” she wrote.

Warren called Trump a bully during an event outside Boston over the weekend.

“He tries to bully me in order to shut me up,” Warren said, according to the Boston Herald. “I seem to be in his head.”

Warren is a favorite of liberals and could be well-positioned to win her party’s nomination given the ascent of the liberal wing.

“She has a very strong base of support and is one of the few figures on the left who has a chance at winning over a broader range of the party,” said Julian Zelizer, a professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University.

He said her focus on consumers and the middle class is the kind of rhetoric that resonated with Sanders supporters in 2016.

Zelizer said the question, if she wins the nomination, is whether she “can withstand what will certainly be a brutal general election campaign against the master attacker.”

Warren’s counterattacks on Trump could be read as sending the message to prospective Democratic primary voters that she’s more than up to that task.

Another factor for Warren is whether some segments of the Democratic electorate see her as too liberal to defeat Trump.

Basil Smikle, a Democratic strategist who served as the executive director of the New York state Democratic Party, said he’s not sure Warren could woo independents.

“Democrats are certainly motivated on issues like [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] separating children and the potential for the Supreme Court to reverse Roe v. Wade, but are independents that upset?” said Smikle, who worked for Clinton. “They may not like Trump’s tactics, but they may, to some extent, like the ultimate outcome if it helps to stem the tide on undocumented workers.”

But Lake argues that Warren would strike directly at independents because of her populist approach.

“In some ways, she’s Trump’s worst nightmare for independents,” she said. “She can run rings around him.”

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http://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/396204-dems-mull-whether-warren-is-the-one-to-take-on-trump
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Donald Trump Tops Obama in Approval Numbers at Same Point in His Presidency

July 5, 2018

“It’s the economy, stupid.”

— James Carville

President Trump’s approval rating on his second Independence Day is at 48% with likely voters.

And that is with 90% negative coverage from the far left mainstream media.

And after a month of anti-ICE protests by Democrats President Trump jumped 10 points with Hispanics in the recent Harris-Harvard poll.

On Barack Obama’s second Independence Day — despite a fawning media — his approval rating was only at 45%.

It comes down to results.
President Trump is delivering on his promises.

Since President Trump’s election the DOW daily closing stock market average has risen as much as 44%. (On November 9th, 2016, the DOW closed at 18,332 – in January of this year the DOW reached heights of over 26,500.).

On February 28th, 2017, President Trump matched President Reagan’s 1987 record for the most continuous closing high trading days when the DOW reached a new high for its 12th day in a row!

Under President Trump the DOW set the record for the fastest 500 point increase between major milestones when it reached 26,000 on January 17th. It only took 6 days to increase 500 points from 25,500.  As a matter of fact, since President Trump’s election the DOW has set records for the fastest 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000, 6000 and 7000 point increases in the DOW’s history!

2017 was the best year ever for the DOW. It increased more points than ever in its history (4,956) and it reached more all-time highs (71) than any year in history!

Every US stock index has reached all-time highs during the Trump Presidency. 

And President Trump’s foreign policy is also seeing results.
History is being made.

President Donald J. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, shake hands as they meet for the first time, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, at the Capella Hotel in Singapore. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2018/07/results-matter-president-trump-tops-obama-in-approval-numbers-at-same-point-in-his-presidency/

The Left needs to face reality: Trump is winning

July 1, 2018

To understand the madness gripping American leftists, try to see the world through their eyes. Presto, you’re now part of the raging resistance.

Like the Palestinians who mark Israel’s birth as their nakba, or tragedy, you regard Donald Trump’s 2016 victory as a catastrophe. It’s the last thing you think of most nights, and the first thing most mornings.

You can’t shake it or escape it. Whatever you watch, listen to or read, there are reminders — Donald Trump really is president.

You actually believe The New York Times is too nice to him, so you understand why a Manhattan woman urged a reporter there to stop covering Trump to protest his presidency.

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Opinion
By Michael Goodwin
New York Post
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And where the hell is Robert Mueller? He was supposed to save us from this nightmare — that’s what Chuck Schumer banked on. Well?

You spend your tax cut even as you rail against the man who made it happen. And you are pleased that cousin Jimmy finally got a job, though you repeat the daily devotional that Barack Obama deserves credit for the roaring economy.

And now this — Justice Anthony Kennedy is retiring, and Trump gets another Supreme Court pick. The court might tilt right for the rest of your life. He’s winning.

NOOOOOOOOO!!!

In a nutshell, our visit to the tortured mind of a Trump hater explains everything from Saturday’s mass marches to why a Virginia restaurant owner declared No Soup for Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

Their loathing for Trump is bone-deep and all consuming. This is war and they take no prisoners.

For most marchers, border policies offer a chance to vent. They didn’t make a peep when Obama did the same thing.

If children are their main concern, they could help the 23,000 New York City kids living in shelters. Or they could have attended the funeral of Lesandro Guzman-Feliz, the innocent Bronx teen hacked to death by a Dominican gang.

Instead, they give in to Trump Derangement Syndrome, which causes them to immediately and absolutely adopt the opposite position of the president’s — facts and common sense be damned.

Alas, they may look back on the last few months as the good old days. For Trump, despite his stumbles and the Mueller shadow, is finding a political sweet spot.

He is reaching a high-water mark in his presidency, with his support growing and expanding. Events, including big Supreme Court rulings and Kennedy’s retirement, give him chances to pad his advantage.

It’s a swift reversal from just 11 days ago, when Trump was sucking wind. The media was — again — treating him like a piñata over the separation of families on the border, and the White House was ready to fight a war it couldn’t win.

Then the president suddenly called off the dogs to sign an executive order ending family separations. Much of the hot air instantly came out of the resistance balloon, though protests continue because the left is embracing little or no border control as its passion of the moment.

Whether it’s because of Trump’s quick reversal and/or the left’s overreaction, polls are capturing the president’s rising fortunes. One survey showed most Americans were not nearly as sympathetic to the illegal border crossers as the media.

“I think it’s terrible about the kids getting split up from their parents. But the parents shouldn’t have been here,” a Minnesota woman told the Times.

Another poll shows Trump with 90 percent support among Republicans, matching the backing of President George W. Bush after 9/11.

And his support is broadening. A Harvard CAPS/Harris poll showed his approval rating hitting 47 percent, a two-point gain in one month driven by a 10-point swing among Hispanic voters and a four-point gain among Democrats.

Pollsters attributed the rise to the strong economy and that a whopping 75 percent approved of the president’s decision to meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un.

Finally, a Pew finding about Trump supporters upends stereotypes: Just 31 percent are white men without college degrees, while 66 percent are college graduates, women or nonwhites.

These signs of the Big Mo switching sides came before two Supreme Court rulings that favored Trump. The first upheld his revised travel ban for a handful of Muslim-majority nations, saying it was within his ­executive authority.

It rebuked lower-court judges who bought the partisan canard that it was a “Muslim ban.” Their invalid rulings stood in stark contrast to plain readings of the law and show them to be hacks blowing with the political wind.

The second ruling, which blocks municipal unions from forcing workers to pay dues, is a tax cut for workers who opt out and a blow to Dems in New York, New Jersey and other blue states. The nexus between unions and Democrats turned those states into one-party fiefdoms — and resulted in union contracts taxpayers can’t afford.

Both rulings were 5-4, with Kennedy supplying the swing votes in an otherwise evenly divided court. That Trump will soon nominate his successor and likely have that person confirmed before the midterm elections improves GOP chances to hold Congress and the president’s chance to cement his legacy as an agent of dramatic change.

Because Democrats set the agenda for most media, the immediate talking point was that abortion rights are threatened with another GOP pick. While that is unlikely, given the Supremes’ traditional respect for precedent, the larger fact is that there is much more at stake than any single issue.

Consider that the travel-ban case upheld broad presidential authority on national security, and the union ruling was among several supporting First Amendment rights of individuals against government infringement.

Rulings like these have long-term cultural and political impacts and explain why Supreme Court appointments can have an outsized influence on a president’s legacy.

Already Neil Gorsuch, Trump’s first pick, is enormously popular with those who believe a justice’s job is to make sure laws pass constitutional muster, not legislate from the bench. A second pick in the Gorsuch mold would secure a majority on the court for curbing government’s appetite for more domestic power, perhaps for decades.

And that could do something extraordinary for Trump’s legacy. All else being stable, putting the Supreme Court on an enduring constitutional footing would make his presidency one of the most consequential of any age.

Cue the wailing.

https://nypost.com/2018/06/30/the-left-needs-to-face-reality-trump-is-winning/

Trump Beating Washington at Its Own Game, Expects To Get a Deal With China

June 26, 2018

“It’s the economy, stupid,” Bill Clinton advisor James Carville  once said….

Image result for James Carville, photos

The more President Donald Trump antagonizes his critics, the more Republicans seem to support him, Axios co-founder Jim VandeHei told CNBC on Monday morning.

The president “feels like he’s got his mojo,” VandeHei said on “Squawk Box.” “For all the hyperventilation … you would think the president is going to get run out of town, yet he’s at 45 percent in Gallup, the highest favorable rating he’s had since the early days of his presidency,”

Trump’s overall approval rating hit 45 percent last week, matching the highest level of his presidency, which happened in the first week after his inauguration, according to Gallup’s weekly presidential approval poll.

President Donald Trump and South Carolina governor
Donald Trump in South Carolina, June 25, 2018 — with Governor Henry McMaster.

However, on Monday afternoon, Gallup said Trump’s approval rating slipped back to 41 percent. GOP support remained high at 87 percent, according to Gallup.

In a separate poll, Trump’s economic approval rating surged 6 points to 51 percent in the latest CNBC All-America Economic Survey. It was his first above 50 percent in the poll, which had a margin of error of 3.5 points.

Referring to last week’s Gallup survey, VandeHei said: “The reason it’s 45 percent is 90 percent of Republicans are super-enthusiastic about what the president is doing. … I would say the tribal dimension of politics is getting more intense. And the president understands that. He sees in the polls that it may be working.”

“There’s this weird dynamic taking place: The more the president says things that outrage his critics, his critics go even more bananas, which then have the effect of making Republicans want to support Trump even more,” even if they don’t like what he’s doing on trade or at the border on immigration, VandeHei said.

VandeHei said the president is the most isolated he’s been since taking office. “He is definitely on his own more than any point in his presidency. He’s doing the communication. He’s doing the policy.”

“It’s creating mass amounts of chaos internally,” but voters seem to be focusing on the strengthening economy and jobs picture and a possible nuclear deal with North Korea instead of all the noise, said VandeHei, who helped launch Axios in January 2017 after leaving Politico, which he also co-founded and turned into a political powerhouse. Axios has gained a reputation as a place for Washington-related scoops.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/25/axios-jim-vandehei-trump-beating-washington-at-its-own-game.html

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Jim VandeHei added that Donald Trump expects to get a trade deal with China

See:

https://www.cnbc.com/video/2018/06/25/axios-ceo-trump-thinks-hell-get-a-deal-with-china.html

Jim Vandehei, Axios co-founder and CEO, discusses the state of U.S.-China trade tensions and what actions the Trump administration is taking.

Trump Tests His Appeal in Nevada, a State Clinton Won

June 24, 2018

President headlines fundraiser for Sen. Dean Heller, who is seeking re-election

Sen. Dean Heller (R., Nev.), left, shakes hands with President Donald Trump during a discussion on tax reform in Las Vegas on Saturday.
Sen. Dean Heller (R., Nev.), left, shakes hands with President Donald Trump during a discussion on tax reform in Las Vegas on Saturday.PHOTO: KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS

LAS VEGAS— Donald Trump took his economic nationalism and insult-driven politics to Nevada on Saturday, testing whether his campaign style can help Republicans in a state carried by his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in 2016.

Mr. Trump made the trek to Las Vegas to headline a fundraiser for Sen. Dean Heller, the only Republican senator in the state seeking re-election this year.

“He was with me all the way—once we got elected,” Mr. Trump said, repeatedly recalling Mr. Heller’s delay in backing his bid for the White House. “A little bit shaky in the beginning.”

Mr. Heller “cut your taxes and nobody fought harder to cut your taxes than Dean Heller, let me tell you,” Mr. Trump said. The Democrats, he said, “want tax increases. They want open borders.”

Mr. Heller’s race is one of the most consequential Senate contests of the year, as Republicans seek to hold on to their 51-49 majority in November’s elections. Nevada, a swing state, will be critical come November, with a Senate seat, the governor’s office and two competitive House races on the ballot.

It’s an open question whether Mr. Trump’s trademark bare-knuckled campaigning will help or hurt Mr. Heller and the rest of the GOP Nevada ticket this fall. More registered voters in the state disapproved of the president than approved of him—49% to 47%—in a May poll conducted by Morning Consult.

In addition to trying to paint state Democrats as weak on border security and favoring higher taxes, Mr. Trump hurled personal insults at the opponents of the Republican candidate.

He called Mr. Heller’s challenger, Rep. Jacky Rosen, as “Wacky Jacky” at Saturday’s Nevada Republican Party Convention. Democrats were holding their own state convention in Reno, featuring Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

“Wacky Jacky is campaigning with Pocahontas, can you believe it?” Mr. Trump said, reviving his derogatory nickname for Ms. Warren, a reference to the senator’s claims to have Native-American heritage. “A vote for her is a vote for increased taxes, weak, weak borders, it’s really a vote for crime, it’s a vote to get rid of police officers.”

Shortly after the president concluded his remarks, Ms. Rosen tweeted, “Is that the best you’ve got, @realDonaldTrump? Let’s fight back.” She used Mr. Trump’s appearance in the state to raise funds on her website, where she cites opposition to his presidency and policies as a driving force for her campaign.

“President Trump is trying to pull up the ladder behind him, leaving the middle class stranded while his super-wealthy buddies turn the federal government into a source of enrichment for themselves,” Ms. Rosen’s site says. “Trump ridicules women, people of color, the LGBTQ community, immigrant families, and anyone who challenges him.”

Ms. Warren has called the Pocahontas nickname a “racial slur.”

Despite the GOP’s majority in Congress, Mr. Trump has struggled to secure support for some of his top-priority campaign pledges, like his efforts to replace the Affordable Care Act, to fund a wall along the Mexican border and to pass legislation curbing immigration.

“The fact is we need more Republicans because the Democrats are obstructionists,” the president said Saturday. He drew boos from the crowd when he mentioned Senate and House minority leaders Chuck Schumer of New York and Nancy Pelosi of California.

Facing mounting political pressure, Mr. Trump signed an executive order last week to end the separation of families crossing the U.S. border illegally. Images of unaccompanied children at shelters near the border sparked outrage from members of his own party.

Still, he insisted he would pursue a policy of zero tolerance of illegal immigration and continued to hammer at the Democrats for failing to take a tougher stance. “We’re the only country that says ‘Please, would you like to register?’—other countries say ‘Get the hell out’,” Mr. Trump said. “I think I got elected largely because we are strong on the border.”

That line may be a tough sell in Nevada, where more than a quarter of Nevada’s population is Latino. The percentage is higher in Clark County, which includes Las Vegas. Mr. Trump touted his administration’s economic record, highlighting record-low levels of Hispanic unemployment.

Mr. Trump also noted his own property in Las Vegas, joking, “I don’t think about that anymore.”

As he concluded his speech, he said that he is committed to making sure Republican voters turn out come November. “It’s an incredible state,” he said. “I will be back a lot…”

Corrections & Amplifications 
Sen. Dean Heller is a Republican. An earlier version of the caption on this article incorrectly stated he was a Democrat. (June 23, 2018)

Write to Vivian Salama at vivian.salama@wsj.com

https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-tests-his-appeal-in-nevada-a-state-clinton-won-1529798836

The U.S. economy is back in the fast lane — But Democrats want to undo it all

June 22, 2018

Six Months After Tax Reform, Something Big Is Happening

A Honda production line in Marysville, Ohio, Dec. 21, 2017.
A Honda production line in Marysville, Ohio, Dec. 21, 2017. PHOTO: TY WRIGHT/BLOOMBERG NEWS

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Six months ago, Republicans in Congress joined with President Trump to redesign America’s tax code and enact sweeping tax cuts. We were determined to let families and local businesses keep more of what they earn. The new tax code was built to help American companies and workers compete and win anywhere in the world.

Now something big is happening to America’s economy. Since January, more than one million jobs have been created. This has brought claims for unemployment benefits to their lowest level since 1969, and there are now actually more job openings than people looking for work. The U.S. has gone from a nation asking “Where are the jobs?” to one that asks “Where are more workers?”

While this economic turnaround has come as a shock to most Democrats in Washington, it’s no surprise to millions of working families across America. They were overtaxed and overregulated for far too long, and the result was a decade of slow growth.

In only six months, the economy has been reinvigorated—and the best is yet to come. That’s because the new tax code leapfrogs America’s competitors abroad. The U.S. is now at the head of the pack—one of the best places on the planet to find that next job, to build that new manufacturing plant, or to set up company headquarters.

As a result, businesses of all sizes are now investing in American workers and communities. They are bringing back their dollars from overseas and investing at home again. It’s no coincidence that small-business optimism has hit its highest reported level in 35 years.

There is a new hope and a new optimism that wasn’t here before. To call it a sudden change from the sluggish Obama-era economy would be an understatement. For a decade, it was like America’s economy was going through a 25 mph zone. Now that the high taxes and uncompetitive regulations are gone, we’re on the open highway again.

In my home state of Texas, families and business owners tell me that they’re hopeful about their economic outlook for the first time since the Great Recession. A growing economy means real change for millions, and it’s uplifting to hear from so many people who are excited about their futures again. A Gallup poll out this week found that satisfaction with the direction the U.S. is heading has reached a 12-year high. This simply wouldn’t have happened without meaningful tax reform.

The scary thing is that Democrats want to take all of this progress away. They think Washington should keep more of families’ hard-earned money. Critics like House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi continue to deny that tax reform has had any positive effects, and they have actually pledged to raise taxes. Clearly, Democrats are interested in seeing only doom and gloom.

Meantime, Republicans are finding innovative ways to keep improving the tax code to ensure it will remain competitive and pro-growth for Main Street businesses. We’re going to change the culture of Washington so the U.S. doesn’t find itself in the same situation we faced last year, with a tax code that was an anchor dragging down the economy.

Given the choice between keeping taxes high and allowing families to keep more of their money, Republicans chose—and continue to choose—the American people. Empowering families to run their own lives is at the heart of the American Dream. It’s the key to our nation’s economic success, and it’s the reason that, six months into tax reform, Americans are more hopeful about their future.

Mr. Brady, a Texas Republican, is chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.

Image result for Kevin, brady, congress, photos

US manufacturers report record-high optimism after tax reform

June 21, 2018

The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) said Wednesday its quarterly survey of members revealed a record level of optimism following the passage of tax reform.

The Manufacturers’ Outlook Survey for the second quarter of 2018 showed that 95.1% of manufacturers have a positive outlook for their businesses, the best result in the survey’s 20-year history.

“A large part of that is because of the tax cuts and that’s what we hear from our manufacturers,” NAM CEO Jay Timmons said during an exclusive interview on FOX Business’ “After the Bell” on Wednesday.

“We’ve been working for 30 years to enact comprehensive tax reform and regulatory relief,” he added. “We’ve got that done and now we’re seeing the results from it.”

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The industry association also found that U.S. manufacturers are planning to increase investments by 4.1% over the next 12 months, along with a 3.1% increase in hiring — the largest increases since the NAM began tracking manufacturers’ plans. Wages are expected to get a 2.7% boost, the highest since 2001.

Projected sales growth of 5.7% matched the second-highest reading in survey history.

“This is not an accident at all,” Timmons said at a press conference hosted by House Speaker Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc. “This is fueled by the history-making tax reform that was passed six months ago.”

A large majority of manufacturers, aided by tax cuts, plan to increase investments, hire more workers and increase wages and benefits, Timmons added.

“The fact is, we’re just getting started,” he said.

The NAM survey Opens a New Window. comes amid escalated traded tensions between the U.S. and China, the world’s two largest economies. Large manufacturers were most optimistic about exports, expecting 1.9% growth over the next 12 months, the NAM said. Small and medium-sized firms forecasted a 1.3% increase.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/us-manufacturers-report-record-high-optimism-after-tax-reform

Trump tested his power in last night’s primaries — and won

June 13, 2018

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Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Republicans saw a trend continue in South Carolina, where an incumbent who opposed President Trump lost his primary just one week after an incumbent congresswoman in Alabama, who was critical of the president, was forced into a runoff.

Why this matters: The president is becoming a one-man litmus test for Republicans all over the country, proving the GOP has little room for an agenda or ideas that don’t align with his.

Be smart: This isn’t all that surprising. President Trump has an 87% approval rating with Republicans (the second highest since George W. Bush after 9/11). We’ve seen Republicans across the country shift their loyalty to him and away from the party itself.

South Carolina

The Trump factor: The Republican incumbent in South Carolina’s 1st district, Mark Sanford, has criticized President Trump for his tariffs, his behavior, and he’s called on him to release his tax returns. His lack of loyalty to the president ended his congressional career.

  • The president tweeted his support for Sanford’s challenger Katie Arrington just hours before the polls closed. Sanford lost his primary for re-election just one week after Martha Roby — a Republican representative in Alabama — was forced into a runoff after she was tagged as disloyal to Trump. (Roby criticized him after the “Access Hollywood” tape was released during the 2016 election.)

Governor’s race: Henry McMaster, a Republican candidate running for governor, was the first statewide elected official to endorse Trump in 2016, which went a long way: President Trump weighed in twice for him on Twitter.

  • He didn’t make the 50% threshold, so he’s heading to a runoff on June 26, but expect the president to renew his support then.

Virginia

Democrats look poised to keep their blue wave washing over Virginia after last night’s primaries. Strong Democratic women candidates were nominated in the state’s four most vulnerable GOP-held districts (2nd, 6th, 7th and 10th) and a controversial conservative candidate was nominated for U.S. Senate.

  • Why it matters: Women have been outperforming in Democratic primaries across the country, and they dominated in last year’s elections, with women winning 11 of the 15 state legislature seats Democrats flipped. Overall, Democrats swept Virginia in the 2017 elections for governor and state legislature.
  • GOP Rep. Barbara Comstock will face Jennifer Wexton in Virginia’s 10th district. The real warning sign here is that Comstock, a two-term incumbent, couldn’t prevent her random Republican challenger from getting nearly 40% of the vote.

Virginia’s GOP Senate primary is already giving Republicans a headache. Controversial candidate Corey Stewart won; he’ll face Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine in November.

  • Just look at what Republicans are saying. The state’s former Republican lieutenant governor said he was “extremely disappointed” in Stewart’s victory. “Every time I think things can’t get worse they do, and there is no end in sight,” he tweeted.
  • “Stewart will bring down the entire ticket,” a national Democratic source told Richmond Times-Dispatch reporter Patrick Wilson.
  • The Cook Political Report’s Dave Wasserman predicts Stewart’s victory will weaken Republicans’ chances in four House races across the state.

The bottom line: The two most powerful forces in this year’s midterm elections so far are women and President Trump.

https://www.axios.com/2018-primary-elections-south-carolina-virginia-trump-sanford-stewart-bf215416-90ee-4faf-8f64-9d5f9fa4940f.html

If There’s a Red Wave Election in 2018, This Will Be Why

June 10, 2018

Democrats promising higher taxes and impeachment are hurting their candidates…

As primaries roll by and the midterms approach, it’s worth remembering that for Republicans 2016 represented an opportunity more than a victory. It was a chance for them to help the country break the 30-year-spell the Clintons and the Bushes cast, President Barack Obama notwithstanding.

It was also a chance for rank-and-file Republicans to replace an insulated, often feckless, party leadership that had elevated its own interests over everyone else’s. With their fixation on the person of President Trump, most Democrats don’t understand that for Republicans, taking the party back is part of a larger intellectual and political project. It’s also a big part of what’s at stake in this year’s midterms.

Image result for children waving american flags, photos

Opinion
By Christopher Buskirk
The New York Times

As far as Republicans are concerned, the primaries are a continuation of the fight to claw back control of the party. Will it be retaken by the Bushes, their allies and clones and the claque of sinecured retainers who smothered the once-vibrant conservative movement of Buckley and Reagan? Or can the grass roots consummate the promise of 2016’s revolt against ruling-class misrule?

Mr. Trump isn’t on the ballot, but the ideas that animate the current conservative renaissance are. They are represented by some interesting Senate candidates, who have quite different biographies but common goals. Josh Hawley in Missouri is a Stanford- and Yale-educated lawyer who clerked for Chief Justice John Roberts, while Matt Rosendale in Montana is a rancher-turned-politician. Both are running on a platform of returning power to the people and nurturing a sense of community and solidarity among Americans that many Republican politicians either ignored or openly disdained.

Republicans have long criticized Democrats for dividing the country into competing grievance groups. Some now realize that the Republican analogue has been to divide the country into radically autonomous individuals based on a cartoonish misreading of libertarianism that replaces the free markets and free minds of Friedrich Hayek with the greed and hubris of Gordon Gekko. But that is changing quickly. There is a renewed emphasis on addressing America and Americans as a community characterized by fraternal bonds and mutual responsibility — what Lincoln called the “mystic chords of memory.”

Lou Barletta, who is seeking the Republican Senate nomination in Pennsylvania. Credit Matt Slocum/Associated Press

Mr. Trump tapped into this. Most Republicans accept his transgressive personality and his intentional tweaking of social and political norms because they see it as in service of those larger ideas. That will seem counterintuitive to Trump haters, but fiddling with tax rates, however necessary and beneficial, can’t sustain a political movement, let alone a nation. Issues of citizenship and solidarity — that is to say, asking what it means to be an American — have returned to the fore. This is partly because of Mr. Trump and partly in spite of him. What is important is that the tumult caused by his unusual candidacy and his unusual approach to governing created an environment in which an intellectual refounding of Republican politics became possible.

The three-legged stool of the new Republican majority is a pro-citizen immigration policy, a pro-worker economic policy and a foreign policy that rejects moral imperialism and its concomitant foreign wars. John Adams described just such a foreign policy when he wrote that America is “the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all” but “the champion and vindicator only of her own.”

Giving up on a failed policy of moral imperialism allows Republicans to focus on forming good citizens and restoring a sense of Americanism that relies upon strong ties of fellowship and belief in a shared destiny. To that end, our candidates would be well advised to ignore strategists and consultants who talk exclusively in terms of messaging tailored to statistical constructs like “disaffected Democrats with some college” or “married suburban men who drive S.U.V.s.” When it comes to politics, most people don’t want to be addressed as members of a demographic group looking for a payoff. They want to be addressed as Americans.

Senate candidates like Lou Barletta in Pennsylvania and Mike Braun in Indiana, who have embraced the rhetoric and the policies that connect citizenship and civic virtue, have seen it propel them to victory in their recent primaries. This is a salutary change from the last generation of Republican politicians who seemed to think that they could persuade voters with spreadsheets and PowerPoint presentations. While appeals to narrow self-interest can work for a while, they eventually fall short because they ignore human nature. From Martha McSally in Arizona to Marsha Blackburn in Tennessee, candidates are sharing this all-embracing message.

That’s why Mr. Trump’s rhetoric works. When he speaks off the cuff, he talks about “we,” “us” and “our.” He has said repeatedly that we love our farmers, our police, our flag and our national anthem — even our coal miners. It is an odd construction, or at least one we’re not used to hearing. It speaks to the essential fraternity of the nation, but when Mr. Trump says it — maybe when any Republican says it — too many people don’t believe that they are included in the “our.” They hear something much narrower than what is meant. People reject the essentially wholesome message because of the messenger. That needs to change because they are, in fact, our farmers, our police and our coal miners, and we should love them. The bonds of civil union that ought to hold us together demand that we love our fellow citizens in their imperfection even as they love us in ours.

This year’s class of Republican candidates seems to get that in ways that they didn’t in 2016. As a result, the Democrats’ advantage in the generic congressional vote dropped from 13 points in January, according to the Real Clear Politics poll average, to 3.5 points at the end of May. A Reuters poll, which recorded a 14-point Democratic edge in April, gave Republicans a 6-point advantage last month. Apparently “resistance” and impeachment aren’t as popular as Democratic megadonors like Tom Steyer and their vassals would have Democratic candidates believe, although RealClearPolitics and Reuters now show Democrats with roughly an eight-point advantage.

Ned Ryun, a veteran Republican activist, noted that the polls now closely mirror the polls in May 2014, when Democrats went on to lose 13 House seats. He also notes that while there are nearly 40 Republicans who are not seeking re-election, only six of them represent districts won by Hillary Clinton. Financially, Republicans are in much better shape, with the Republican National Committee holding $44 million in cash while the Democratic National Committee is $5 million in debt.

There are even more cracks in the Democrats’ front line. Longtime Democrats like Mark Penn, a former Clinton pollster and confidant, are sick of the scandal mongering. Mr. Penn wrote recently that “Rather than a fair, limited and impartial investigation, the Mueller investigation became a partisan, open-ended inquisition that, by its precedent, is a threat to all those who ever want to participate in a national campaign or an administration again.”

At some point, the combination of scandal fatigue — there is almost no crime of which Mr. Trump is not regularly accused — and the continuing revelations of improprieties by government officials (in the F.B.I., at the Department of Justice and elsewhere) will lead voters to believe that Mr. Trump got a raw deal.

Nancy Pelosi, the House minority leader, is pledging higher taxes. Al Green, a seven-term Texas Democrat, and at least 58 other House Democrats, are promising impeachment. But the stock market is up, wages are up, unemployment is down, and peace may be breaking out on the Korean Peninsula. How many people will vote for higher taxes and all the social and political stress associated with impeachment?

Some Democrats are beginning to sense this. One Washington Post columnist predicted that “there will be no Trump collapse” while others are expressing concern that Mr. Mueller’s investigation — his dawn raids and strong-arm tactics — don’t play well in Peoria. If Mr. Mueller is not able to prove collusion with Russia, the stated reason for his appointment, then Democrats, who have talked about little else for the past 18 months, will be left looking unserious or worse. They’re right to worry.

Up until recently, the conventional wisdom has been that a blue wave powered by a huge enthusiasm gap would propel Democrats to midterm glory. But the evidence doesn’t bear that out. Yes, Democrats have won some special elections and those victories are real and should warn Republicans against complacency. But left almost totally unremarked upon is that Republican primary turnout is way up from where it was at this point in the 2014 midterm cycle. This is often the result of competitive primaries, but that underscores the vibrancy of the grass roots’ struggle to reclaim control of the party.

According to Chris Wilson at WPI Intelligence, Republican primary turnout was up 43 percent or more over 2014 in states like Indiana, Ohio and West Virginia. The president’s popularity has been rising overall but especially in these critical battleground states. In West Virginia, his approval rating was over 60 percent in 2017. That sounds more like a red wave than a blue one, especially for imperiled senators like Joe Manchin in West Virginia and Claire McCaskill in Missouri.

Yes, the victories won in 2016 can be reversed, but only by voters at the polls and not by any of the irregular means that occupy the fantasies of many people who still can’t believe that their side lost. Persuasion still matters — and it better matter or we’ve got bigger problems. For Republicans, this should be a back-to-basics election. Talk about principles, not just tactics. Talk about America. If Republicans really want to win, then their pronouns must be we, us and our, and they have to make sure that the people who hear them know that they are included in we, us and our. That’s the key to building an enduring electoral majority and a better country.

Christopher Buskirk (@thechrisbuskirk) is editor and publisher of the journal American Greatness, a co-author of “American Greatness: How Conservatism, Inc. Missed the 2016 Election and What the D.C. Establishment Needs to Learn,” and a contributing opinion writer.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTopinion), and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter.

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page SR4 of the New York edition with the headline: If There’s a Red Wave Election in 2018, This Will Be Why.

Mitt Romney: Trump will be reelected in 2020

June 8, 2018
Mitt Romney is pictured. | Getty Images

 

“I think that growth and the higher incomes people are seeing means that Republicans will do just fine in November,” said Mitt Romney, the former 2012 GOP presidential nominee and current U.S. Senate candidate. | George Frey/Getty Images

Republican Senate candidate Mitt Romney bluntly predicted here on Thursday evening that President Donald Trump would win reelection in 2020.

Addressing a group of major GOP donors, Romney — who bitterly collided with Trump during the 2016 campaign and implored his party to nominate someone else — also said Trump would easily capture the Republican Party’s 2020 nomination.

He said Trump’s political fortunes would be bolstered by a pair of factors: an improving economy and the likelihood that Democrats would choose an outside-the-mainstream candidate.

“I think President Trump will be re-nominated by my party easily, and I think he’ll be reelected solidly,” Romney said.

“I think that not just because of the strong economy and because people are increasingly seeing rising wages, but I think it’s also true because I think our Democrat friends are likely to nominate someone who is really out of the mainstream of American thought and will make it easier for a president who is presiding over a growing economy,” he added.

Since launching his Utah Senate candidacy earlier this year, Romney has praised some of Trump’s early actions as president while saying he disagrees with the president’s bombastic style.

During a recent interview with NBC News, Romney, a former Massachusetts governor and the GOP’s 2012 nominee, said he wouldn’t “point to the president as a role model for my grandkids on the basis of his personal style. He has departed in some cases from the truth, and has attacked in a way that I think is not entirely appropriate.”

After the 2016 race, the relationship between Trump and Romney warmed somewhat, with the president-elect briefly considering Romney to serve as his secretary of state before ultimately picking ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson. Still, there were signs of strain. Earlier this year, Trump waged an unsuccessful bid to persuade longtime Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch to seek reelection and block Romney.

After Hatch announced that he wouldn’t seek reelection, the president endorsed Romney for the seat.

The remarks came on the opening night of the E2 Summit, an annual Romney-hosted event that draws influential political leaders and donors. This year’s event is expected to draw a number of bold-faced names, including former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, investor Stephen Schwarzman, and House Speaker Paul Ryan, who was Romney’s vice-presidential nominee.

Actor and comedian Seth Rogen is expected to speak on brain health.

Romney also offered a bullish assessment of the GOP’s 2018 midterm prospects, arguing that the party would retain control of both chambers of Congress.

“I think that growth and the higher incomes people are seeing means that Republicans will do just fine in November,” he said. “I think we will hold the House, I think we’ll hold the Senate. I know a lot of pundits don’t believe that. I think we will.”

Romney is heavily favored to capture the Utah Senate seat. He faces a June 26 runoff for the GOP nomination against Mike Kennedy, a conservative state representative.

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/06/07/romney-trump-reelection-2020-632995