Posts Tagged ‘violence’

Philippines Vice President Urges Focus on Rising Prices, Killings, Violence and Impunity — Not New Government and Federalism

July 8, 2018
Talk on federalism? Focus on rising prices, killings instead — Robredo
Gaea Katreena Cabico (philstar.com) – July 8, 2018 – 12:33pm

MANILA, Philippines — Vice President Leni Robredo on Sunday said discussion on a proposed shift to a federal form of government should not be rushed and should not overshadow other pressing issues that affect Filipinos.

“Why not pay attention to important issues that affect the public such as the rising prices of commodities and spate of killings?” Robredo said in Filipino on RMN-DZXL.

Inflation spiked to 5.2 percent in June from 4.6 percent in May, beating the central bank’s forecast of 4.3 to 5.1 percent range for the month.

Tanauan City, Batangas Mayor Antonio Halili, General Tinio, Nueva Ecija Mayor Ferdinand Bote and Trece Martires City, Cavite Vice Mayor Alex Lubigan were killed in separate attacks last week. The killings of local executives has raised concerns over violence and impunity in the country.

Vice President Leni Robredo

Robredo said that talk on the proposal to create a new charter should not be rushed.

“The people should understand what it is about, its effects. Discussions on the matter should not be rushed,” Robredo,—who is not from “Imperial” Metro Manila, which proponents of federalism say dictates on the provinces and hogs development—said.

Surveys: Filipinos not keen on charter change

Social Weather Stations survey released late June showed that only 37 percent favored the shift to a federal system of government, while 29 percent expressed opposition to it. Another 34 percent were undecided about the matter.

A separate Pulse Asia survey released May found that 66 percent of Filipinos said they are not in favor of replacing the present unitary system of government with a federal one. Only 27 percent expressed support for the change to a federal system, while six percent were ambivalent on it.

“Everyone in the government should exert more effort on popularizing the need to shift to a federal form of government, its advantages to the people and effects to the lives of common people,” presidential spokesperson Harry Roque said in late June in response to the survey results.

The 22-member consultative committee tasked by President Rodrigo Duterte to review the 1987 Constitution unanimously approved a draft charter for a federal government Tuesday. The draft constitution will be submitted to the chief executive on July 9.

He is expected to formally endorse the draft charter to Congress in his next State of the Nation Address on July 23.

Read more at https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/07/08/1831696/talk-federalism-focus-rising-prices-killings-instead-robredo#VGLmtX4XELleZ54D.99

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Calls for calm after French police killing sparks riots

July 4, 2018

The French government called for calm Wednesday after the killing of a 22-year-old man by police sparked riots in the western city of Nantes, highlighting the simmering tensions between youths and security forces in deprived urban areas.

Rioters set fire to cars and a medical centre in the city on Tuesday night after news spread that an officer had shot dead the 22-year-old, named by local newspaper Ouest France as Bubakar, after stopping his car over an infraction.

© AFP | Cars were burned and a shopping centre partly set alight in the Breil neighbourhood of France’s Nantes as police confronted young people, some armed with molotov cocktails

Youths clashed with police in the northwestern neighbourhood of Breil where the killing took place, lobbing molotov cocktails, before the unrest spread to two other poorer districts with a history of gang violence.

Burned-out cars littered the streets on Wednesday morning.

Interior Minister Gerard Collomb condemned the violence, adding that “all the necessary resources are being mobilised” to “calm the situation and prevent any further incidents”.

Local police chief Jean-Christophe Bertrand said the youth had hit a policeman with his car, lightly injuring him, after a squad stopped the vehicle at around 8.30 pm for an alleged infraction and tried to take him to the police station for identification.

“One of his colleagues then fired, hitting the young man who unfortunately died,” Bertrand told reporters.

He was hit in the carotid artery and declared dead on arrival at hospital, police sources said.

Judicial police and a national watchdog which investigates claims of police wrongdoing are investigating to clarify “the facts and determine in what circumstances the policeman used his weapon,” said Pierre Sennes, public prosecutor for Nantes.

He said on Wednesday that the young man had been wanted by police in Creteil, near Paris, for robbery and other offences.

– ‘I saw everything burning’ –

French police have a long history of strained relations with youths in poor, immigrant-heavy suburbs — not least since the death of two teenagers, electrocuted while hiding from officers, sparked nationwide riots in 2005.

The assault of a young black man by police — which led to officers being charged, including for rape after a truncheon was shoved up the youth’s anus — sparked fresh unrest last year.

In January, the government vowed a crackdown on urban violence after shocking video footage emerged of a policewoman being beaten by a crowd of youths in the Paris suburbs on New Year’s Eve.

Breil, the Nantes neighbourhood where the young man was shot dead Tuesday, is a socially mixed district home to a large housing estate with a history of gang violence.

Police had boosted their presence in the area after a series of violent incidents on June 28.

Malakoff and Dervallieres, the other neighbourhoods hit by riots on Tuesday, have been plagued by drugs and poverty for years.

They fall into a category of problem neighbourhoods which are set to receive extra police help from next September under reforms by President Emmanuel Macron.

Steven, 24, who lives in Breil, told an AFP journalist that he had “heard explosions” and headed to investigate.

“I saw everything burning. There were fires in the bins, the cars. They were breaking everything. It lasted ages,” he said.

Neighbourhood residents were in shock on Wednesday morning at the young man’s death.

“That guy, he always had a smile on his face,” a young man who gave his name as Chris told Ouest France.

“He was a sweet guy. We have lost a friend, a brother.”

He added: “I knew him well. He was from Paris but he’d lived here for a while, he had family here. For us, he was a kid from the neighbourhood.”

Nationally, French police have complained of coming under increasing strain in recent years, with a parliamentary report released Tuesday detailing high suicide rates within the force.

AFP

Related:

France: Violent clashes in Nantes after police shoot young man

July 4, 2018

Protesters have set fire to cars and a shopping mall after police shot dead a 22-year-old man in Nantes. A French lawmaker has announced a full investigation into how the man was killed during a traffic stop.

    
Firefighters work to put out a fire near a burning car

French lawmaker Valerie Oppelt on Wednesday called for calm after police shot and killed a 22-year-old man in Nantes, triggering unrest in several neighborhoods across the western city.

Shortly after news of the man’s death emerged, groups of young protesters gathered in the Breil neighborhood. The protesters threw Molotov cocktails and torched at least three vehicles and a shopping center during clashes with police.

Read more: Can Emmanuel Macron’s banlieues plan reach the poor?

“Nantes was the scene of violence last night. I appeal for calm. An investigation is under way to learn the circumstances of this tragedy,” Oppelt said in a tweet. “My thoughts go out to the residents of the Breil neighborhood.”

Valérie Oppelt

@valerie_oppelt

a été cette nuit le théâtre de violences. J’en appelle au calme. Une enquête est en cours pour connaître les circonstances de ce drame. Lumière doit être faite.
Pensée aux habitants des quartiers

Local police chief Jean-Christophe Bertrand said the 22-year-old man was pulled over during a traffic check, but his identity was “not clear and officers received orders to bring the driver to the police station.”

The man then attempted to reverse the vehicle, in the process hitting a police officer in the knee. “One of his colleagues then fired, hitting the young man who unfortunately died,” Bertrand said.

Police secure perimeter of shopping mall as firefighters attempt to put out blazeProtesters torched a shopping mall in the Dervallieres neighborhood

Police: ‘We expect the worst’

Groups of protesters also clashed with police in the Dervallieres and Malakoff neighborhoods, known as sensitive areas in Nantes. “We expect the worst in the coming days,” police said, according to the Nantes-based Presse-Ocean newspaper.

Authorities said Nantes police will receive reinforcements to ensure security in the affected neighborhoods.

The protests resembled civil unrest that erupted in Paris’ “banlieues” – low-income migrant neighborhoods on the outskirts of the capital – in 2005 and have flared up several times since then.

Read more: Emmanuel Macron leaves France’s suburbs in the lurch

In 2005, the banlieu of Clichy-sous-Bois became a focal point of violent protests, which erupted in response to the deaths of two boys killed while fleeing police. They highlighted the country’s broader difficulties integrating minority groups and ultimately paved the way to the presidency for then-Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy.

ls/msh (AFP, dpa)

https://www.dw.com/en/france-violent-clashes-in-nantes-after-police-shoot-young-man/a-44514898

Clashes erupt in western France after fatal police shooting

July 4, 2018

Groups of young people clashed with police in the western French city of Nantes late Tuesday after a 22-year-old man was shot dead by an officer during a police check.

Cars were burned and a shopping centre partly set alight in the Breil neighbourhood as police confronted young people, some armed with Molotov cocktails.

The circumstances in which the man was killed are being investigated by the police.

The incident occurred around 8:30pm (18:30 GMT) when police stopped a vehicle over an infraction, local police chief Jean-Christophe Bertrand said.

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing and outdoor

The identity of the driver was “not clear and officers received orders to bring the driver to the police station.” The driver then hit and slightly injured a police officer, he added.

“One of his colleagues then fired, hitting the young man who unfortunately died,” he said.

Police sources confirmed the young man was wounded during a police check while in a vehicle after he “refused to comply” with police requests.

He was hit in the carotid artery and declared dead on arrival at hospital, the police sources said.

National police are investigating to clarify “the facts and determine in what circumstances the policeman used his weapon,” said Pierre Sennes, the public prosecutor for Nantes.

Steven, 24, who lives in the area, told an AFP journalist that he had “heard explosions” and headed to investigate.

“I saw everything burning. There were fires in the bins, the cars. They were breaking everything. It lasted ages,” he said, adding that things later calmed down.

Violence also broke out in two other sensitive areas, Dervallieres and Malakoff, where vehicles were also set on fire.

Police reinforcements are expected in Nantes, especially in the Breil neighbourhood, which was already on high alert after an incident last week possibly involving a military weapon, according to a source close to the case.

(AFP)

Related:

Clashes after French police shoot young man dead

July 4, 2018

Groups of young people clashed with police in the western French city of Nantes late Tuesday after a 22-year-old man was shot dead by an officer during a police check.

Cars were burned and a shopping centre partly set alight in the Breil neighbourhood as police confronted young people, some armed with molotov cocktails.

The circumstances in which the man was killed are being investigated by the police.

Image result for Nantes, france, map

The incident occurred around 8:30pm (18:30 GMT) when police stopped a vehicle over an infraction, local police chief Jean-Christophe Bertrand said.

The identity of the driver was “not clear and officers received orders to bring the driver to the police station.” The driver then hit and slightly injured a police officer, he added.

“One of his colleagues then fired, hitting the young man who unfortunately died,” he said.

Police sources confirmed the young man was wounded during a police check while in a vehicle after he “refused to comply” with police requests.

He was hit in the carotid artery and declared dead on arrival at hospital, the police sources said.

National police are investigating to clarify “the facts and determine in what circumstances the policeman used his weapon,” said Pierre Sennes, the public prosecutor for Nantes.

Steven, 24, who lives in the area, told an AFP journalist that he had “heard explosions” and headed to investigate.

“I saw everything burning. There were fires in the bins, the cars. They were breaking everything. It lasted ages,” he said, adding that things later calmed down.

Violence also broke out in two other sensitive areas, Dervallieres and Malakoff, where vehicles were also set on fire.

Police reinforcements are expected in Nantes, especially in the Breil neighbourhood, which was already on high alert after an incident last week possibly involving a military weapon, according to a source close to the case.

AFP

Mexican politicians being killed at staggering rates

June 17, 2018
People carry a wooden coffin and wooden cross in Mexico down the street.
Photo: Francisco Robles/AFP/Getty Images

Since September, 113 candidates, pre-candidates, and current and former politicians in Mexico have been killed ahead of its elections, according to Etellekt, a policy consultancy in the country — and there are still about two weeks to go.

Why it matters: The violence is not just killing people, it is acting as a deterrent to would-be politicians. About 600 candidates of different parties have backed out of running in the last few months out of fear for their safety, per BuzzFeed News.

  • Volunteers haven’t been handing out flyers in Durango State because it has been too dangerous, Carlos Figueroa Ibarra, the head of human rights at Morena, the party leading presidential polls, told BuzzFeed News.
  • The Party of the Democratic Revolution did not put forward candidates in parts of Sinaloa State due to lack of security.

Context: Although running for office is in Mexico is known to be a violent affair riddled with criminal gang violence, this year is possibly more violent because it is the largest election in the country’s history — the number of open roles exceeds 3,400. There has also been an uptick in violence and murders more generally in Mexico due to the recent fragmentation of cartels.

The violence

By the numbers: It’s not just about politics — Mexico is on track to pass 30,000 murders this year, which would transcend its record for murders last year.

https://www.axios.com/mexico-politicians-killed-rates-elections-f25b0223-6f02-4852-8fc0-7fb184ff3e61.html

Go deeper:

Wave of arrests in Egypt ahead of Sisi’s second term (He got 97 Percent of the vote!)

June 1, 2018

 

Supporters of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi celebrate following his re-election for a second term on April 2. A wave of arrests signals El-Sisi’s government’s fear of social dissent, analysts say. (AFP)

As Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi prepares to be sworn in for a second four-year term on Saturday, a wave of arrests signals his government’s fear of social dissent, analysts say.

Personalities involved in the January 2011 popular uprising that brought down president Hosni Mubarak are among those to have been detained, amid a crackdown that began after March elections gave Sisi an official 97 percent of the vote.

© AFP/File / by Mona Salem | A file picture shows a supporter of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on the back of a pickup truck in Cairo’s Tahrir square on January 25, 2018

Two of those arrested are blogger and journalist Wael Abbas and Shadi Ghazali Harb, one of the youth leaders during the 2011 revolution.

They also include Hazim Abdelazim, who has described his decision to head the youth committee of Sisi’s successful 2014 presidential bid as his “biggest mistake”.

“The arrests are in line with the repressive policies of recent years, which aim to subdue” all potential checks on power, said Karim Bitar, a researcher at the French Institute for International and Strategic Affairs.

A month ahead of the elections, the public prosecutor’s office warned the media it would act against the dissemination of “false information” deemed detrimental to the country’s “safety and security”.

The latest arrests show “nothing has changed in the security-focused policies of the regime” in Egypt, said Mostafa Kamel el-Sayed, a political science professor at Cairo University.

“There is still worry of a repeat of what happened in January 2011, which the president has expressed more than once,” said Sayed.

Economic hardship may also be making the authorities jittery, analysts say.

The government has brought in a value-added tax, cut fuel subsidies and hiked electricity prices, as it seeks to keep to the terms of a $12-billion (10.3-billion-euro) loan deal with the International Monetary Fund.

The authorities may also fear activists will “use these circumstances to mobilise citizens against Sisi’s regime”, with figures who made their names in 2011 a particular source of potential concern, Sayed told AFP.

A collapse in the value of the currency in late 2016 and resultant inflation, which peaked at 33 percent last July, has also left consumers feeling the pinch.

Another electricity price hike and cut to fuel subsidies are planned for the summer.

To prepare the public for this unpopular medicine, state-run media has cited the government’s massive 104-billion-pound ($5.8 billion, five-billion-euro) petroleum subsidy bill and the squeeze caused by oil prices rising back above $75 per barrel.

– ‘State of oppression’ –

Advocacy groups have condemned the arrests, calling on authorities to release the activists, with Human Rights Watch on Thursday denouncing a “state of oppression”.

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The European Union’s foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini has also condemned the wave of arrests.

“Sustainable stability and security can only go hand in hand with the full respect of human rights and fundamental freedoms,” her spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said.

“The increasing number of arrests of human rights defenders, political activists and bloggers in the latest weeks in Egypt is therefore a worrying development,” said Kocijancic.

Egyptian foreign ministry spokesman Ahmed Abu Zeid rejected the criticisms, saying the EU’s track record in human rights can also be condemned.

Abu Zeid pointed to “the immense difficulty and degrading treatment suffered by many of the immigrants and refugees, as well as the violations committed by law enforcement authorities” in the EU.

“That is in addition to the growing effect of the rise of extremist, right-wing parties and movements, with the ensuing manifestations of racism, discrimination, violence and hate speech,” Abu Zeid said in a statement.

Also last month an Egyptian military court sentenced Ismail Alexandrani, a prominent journalist and expert on jihadist movements in the Sinai Peninsula, to 10 years in prison.

The court has yet to issue its reasoning, but Alexandrani’s lawyer said he had been accused of publishing military secrets and belonging to the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

For Paris-based researcher Bitar, Egypt’s policy direction is at least in part the consequence of the West’s own policies.

“The Western preference for Arab authoritarianism provides rulers in the Middle East blank cheques that make them feel they have no limits in regards to oppression,” said Bitar.

AFP

by Mona Salem

Hams Says They Are Protests. But The Are Really Irrational Rage — Suicide Riots on Gaza-Israel Border Should Be Condemned

May 15, 2018

On Monday President Donald Trump fulfilled his campaign promise to move the United States embassy in Israel to the country’s capital, Jerusalem. As usual, the American and European media’s coverage interpreted the event in the worst possible light for the nation of Israel. One learns very little from our mainstream news sources about what the move may mean for the nations primarily concerned—Israel and the United States—but a great deal about the Palestinian “protests” happening along Israel’s southern border with Gaza: Headlines in the New York Times and Washington Postproclaimed (misleadingly) “Israel Kills Dozens and Wounds 1700 at Gaza Border” and “Over 50 Killed in Gaza Protests as U.S. Opens Embassy in Jerusalem.”

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, sky and outdoor

Hamas and the Palestinians send a message: “We want Israelis dead.” They made a choice to act this way. It wasn’t necessary or even smart….

We put the word “protests” in quotation marks advisedly. In ordinary English usage, a protest is a collective action or gesture meant to bring pressure on a government or corporate entity. The Gaza “protests” are meant to bring pressure on Israel, but they’re intended mainly to kill and maim both Israelis and the Palestinian “protesters” themselves.

These demonstrations would be better described as suicide-riots. For nearly two months, Hamas and other militant factions have been encouraging young Palestinian men to storm the fence separating Gaza from Israel. The rioters cut holes in the fence, charge Israeli guards with crude weapons like axes, and lob fire bombs over the wall in attempts to set Israeli fields on fire. Hamas has pledged to massacre those on the other side of the fence, and these riots are expressions of that intention. Israeli defense forces are obliged to respond with force. An axe-clutching Palestinian insanely charging into Israeli territory isn’t a “protester” but a combatant and a terrorist. The fact that he doesn’t expect to prevail against the might of the Israel Defense Forces—he is in essence on a suicide mission—doesn’t somehow oblige Israeli soldiers not to use force to stop him. The Israelis have no choice but to fire back, and they do, often with deadly results.

This is Hamas’s longstanding strategy: The more Palestinian young men die, the more hellish the conditions of Palestinian neighborhoods, the more sympathy aroused in Western media. Hence Palestinian rioters’ destruction of the only cargo passage through which cooking fuel can get to Gaza’s 2 million residents. The act of vandalism appears senseless unless you understand Hamas’s aim is to make Palestinians destitute for the benefit of Western media.

And the Western media generally fill their expected role by placing at least an equal share of the blame on Israel and its American backers. So, for instance, American and European media readily accept casualty statistics from the Gaza Health Ministry, a Hamas outfit deliberately aiming to exaggerate Palestinian deaths. These same media, similarly, nearly always accept as genuine the reasons for the riots expressed by Palestinian organizations. Eighteen years ago, it was Ariel Sharon’s visit to the Temple mount that supposedly sparked the second intifada and the attendant bloodshed. This time, we’re told, it’s Trump’s embassy move that gives Palestinians license to plunder their own resources in acts of irrational rage.

Most ordinary Palestinians, however, appear to be smarter than the smart people whose job it is to give us news about Israel and the Palestinian territories. Despite all the violence in Gaza, the place where most Palestinians live—the West Bank—has remained largely quiet. The Arab neighborhoods of East Jerusalem, too, have been devoid of riots. All contrary to the dire predictions of Western experts who foresaw destruction and bloodshed across the Arab world in response to the U.S. decision to move its embassy.

That time Trump predicted Eric Schneiderman’s downfall — Said he was “worse than Spitzer or Weiner”

May 8, 2018

President Trump appears to have predicted Eric Schneiderman’s downfall — five years ago, in a tweet about the New York attorney general.

Trump compared Schneiderman to two New York Democrats, Rep. Anthony Weiner and Gov. Eliot Spitzer, whose careers exploded amid sex charges.

“Weiner is gone, Spitzer is gone – next will be lightweight A.G. Eric Schneiderman. Is he a crook? Wait and see, worse than Spitzer or Weiner,” Trump tweeted on Sept. 11, 2013.

Rocked by a prostitution scandal, Spitzer — the infamous “Client 9” — resigned in disgrace in 2008, while Weiner was convicted of sexting a minor and sentenced to 21 months in the slammer.

Schneiderman resigned Monday night just hours after he was accused in a bombshell New Yorker report of physical violence against four women, including Michelle Manning Barish and Tanya Selvaratnam.

Just one month before Trump foreshadowed Schneiderman’s demise, the AG had sued the future US president over his failed Trump University, calling it fraudulent, The Wrap reported.

“In New York, we have laws against business fraud, we have laws against consumer fraud,” he said on ABC’s “Good Morning America” when asked about the lawsuit filed against Trump in 2013.

“We have a law against running an illegal unlicensed university. This never was a university … it was really a fraud from beginning to end,” Schneiderman added.

While announcing his intention to step down Tuesday, Schneiderman said: “In the last several hours, serious allegations, which I strongly contest, have been made against me. While these allegations are unrelated to my professional conduct or the operations of the office, they will effectively prevent me from leading the office’s work at this critical time.”

The president had not weighed in by early Tuesday on the latest collapse of a politician in the #MeToo era, but his supporters within and outside the White House have been expressing their glee.

One of them, presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway, simply tweeted: “Gotcha.”

https://nypost.com/2018/05/08/that-time-trump-predicted-eric-schneidermans-downfall/

Toronto Mass Killer: The online ‘incel’ culture is real – and dangerous

April 28, 2018

The man who rammed a rental van into a crowd of people, killing people in Toronto, belonged to an “Incel,” or “involuntarily celibate” group….

Hours before Alek Minassian drove a rented van onto a crowd in Toronto and killed 10 people, police say, a Facebook account linked to him announced, “The Incel Rebellion has already begun!” It praised “Supreme Gentleman Elliot Rodger,” a 22-year-old who killed six people in a stabbing-and-shooting spree in 2014.

“Incel,” or “involuntarily celibate,” isn’t so much a movement as a label used by a group of people drawn together by the same frustration — the inability to attract sexual partners — who blame their lack of conquests on the women who deny them sex and the men supposedly cornering the market.

Most people never heard the term before the Toronto attack, but it has been used for years in online forums. And it flags a culture we should take very seriously because of its potential for violence. That stewing resentment, after all, may not only be behind Minassian’s actions: He certainly wouldn’t be the first man to blame a murderous rampage on sexual failure.

The incel world deifies Rodger, a self-proclaimed “kissless virgin,” who left behind a manifesto. He blamed his killings on women he felt had unfairly rejected him in favor of less worthy men.

And he’s now held in high regard in the dark corners of incel forums, where men describe the violent rage they would unleash on a society that has supposedly made sex too difficult to attain.

Toronto Sexuality Centre Director James Cantor says incel is not “some organization that is joined by some common principles” but rather “a group of people who usually lack sufficient social skills and they usually find themselves very frustrated.” This frustration is voiced on online forums, such as 4Chan and Incels.me, where angry men convince other angry men that their collective inability to land dates is a vast, unjust conspiracy.

“And when they’re surrounded by other people with similar frustrations, they kind of lose track of what typical discourse is, and they drive themselves into more and more extreme beliefs,” says Cantor.

Those beliefs include encouraging acid attacks, rape and murder in retribution for society’s failure to make sex easy for them. In 2017, Reddit banned a subgroup called “r/Incels,” which had garnered about 40,000 members, after the site updated its policy to prohibit content that “encourages, glorifies, incites or calls for violence or physical harm against an individual or group of people.”

A look at Incels.me, where many Reddit users fled to continue wallowing in their misery, gives you a glimpse into their hatred: Posts declare that gamer girls (women who like video games) deserve to be sexually assaulted, call women selfish for “exclusively sleeping with the top % of male[s]” and claim “the blood of victims of terror attacks is on the hands of females.” Comments not only agree with the original poster, but often try to one-up the violent rhetoric.

To be sure, not all self-described “incels” condone violence. And, as Cantor points out, some of the more fevered-up ones can be helped with counseling.

Yet it’s easy to see how their mutually reinforced anger could lead some to lash out. If Minassian’s post represented his beliefs, the online groups that fed his hatred — and any violence he committed — are partly culpable.

Incels’ inability to connect with others may stem from a lack of social skills. But when they abandon the pursuit of relationships in favor of long-winded posts about their anger toward “femoids,” one’s sympathy wanes.

These men imagine themselves victims because they weren’t blessed with good looks, money or charm — attributes they claim women prefer over, say, a good personality (which I’m sure they could offer if only they could stop calling women selfish whores on all-male forums).

The rhetoric on incel forums is dangerous, not only because it ­fuels hate and self-pity, but because it often romanticizes and justifies violence and bolsters the belief that life without sex is meaningless. That led to Rodger being treated as a martyr, and now Minassian too. One post, featuring Minassian as a profile picture, warned: “This is when we attack,” and predicted “at least 10 more incels will go normie hunting by the end of this year.”

Much of this may be just talk, but Rodger, and now presumably Minassian, have proven that some men will take their sexual frustration to the extreme. Meanwhile, the most hardcore “incels” will continue stoking hatred online, while blaming the world for creating the monsters they’re becoming.

Twitter: @BKEROGERS

New York Post

https://nypost.com/2018/04/27/the-online-incel-culture-is-real-and-dangerous/

See also:

Incel, the misogynist ideology that inspired the deadly Toronto attack, explained

https://www.vox.com/world/2018/4/25/17277496/incel-toronto-attack-alek-minassian