Posts Tagged ‘war on drugs’

Philippines: Lawmakers Think About Cutting the Funding to President Duterte’s Police “Drug Personality” Murders

August 20, 2017
By:  – Reporter / @VinceNonatoINQ
 / 05:03 PM August 20, 2017
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Karlo Alexei Nograles - Facebook

Davao City Rep. Karlo Alexei Nograles, chairman of the House of Representatives appropriations committee, expects last week’s brutal sweep of drug suspects to be invoked at the plenary as a basis to cut the budget of the Duterte administration’s antidrug campaign.

But Nograles, an ally of President Rodrigo Duterte, said it might be argued police abuses should not curtail funding for the administration’s so-called war on drugs.

He said the Philippine National Police (PNP) could argue that abusive personnel could be held responsible for the killings and victims could be given justice without affecting its budget.

“Siyempre, ’yung mga nag-abuso ay mananagot,” Nograles said in a radio interview on Sunday. “But, the abuses ng cops na ito should not hinder the campaign of the government to eradicate drugs in the streets. So, ina-anticipate ko na ganun ang magiging defense.”

(“Of course, the abusive ones would be held accountable. But, the abuses of these cops  should not hinder the campaign of the government to eradicate drugs in the streets. So, I anticipate that would be the defense.”)

Nograles added that reducing the budget to stop the police from committing further abuses would arguably lead to the spread of illegal drugs.

“Kung hindi natin ipursige ’yung anti-drugs campaign ni Presidente, the worst thing that can happen is syempre lumaganap na naman ang iligal na droga sa bansa,” he said.

(“If we don’t pursue the President’s antidrug campaign, the worst thing that can happen is of course, illegal drugs would proliferate in the country again.”)

The issue would have to be fought out above the committee level, because Nograles’s panel had concluded its deliberation on the proposed P170.7-billion budget of the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) on Thursday. The PNP is an attached agency of the DILG.

The agencies’ budgets would be debated at the plenary floor beginning Sept. 4, Nograles said. /atm

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/924201/war-on-drugs-karlo-alexei-nograles-2018-national-budget-ejks-police-abuses#ixzz4qIkH5ZKL
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Anger Simmers in Philippines Over Duterte’s Drug War — Distortion of Law — Destruction of Human Rights and Human Lives — “Mass Murder” — More than 12,500 people dead

August 20, 2017

MANILA — Mourners at the funeral of a Philippine man who police shot dead protested his innocence on Sunday, the latest sign of rising anger over President Rodrigo Duterte’s bloody campaign to stamp out drugs.

More than 12,500 people, many small-time drug users and dealers, have been killed since Duterte took office in June 2016. Police say about 3,500 of those killed were shot by officers in self-defense.

Human rights monitors believe many of the remaining two thirds were killed by assassins operating with police backing or by police disguised as vigilantes – a charge the police deny.

On Sunday, dozens of mourners wearing with white T-shirts with the slogan “Kill drugs, not people”, bore the coffin of Leover Miranda to his grave in a Manila cemetery.

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Miranda was killed this month in what police said was a drug sting operation but relatives say he was innocent.

“I want justice for my son,” Elvira Miranda, 69, told Reuters.

“I have no powerful friends, I do not know what to do, but I want the people behind this senseless killing punished.”

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Most people in the Philippines support the anti-drug campaign and Duterte remains a popular leader but questions have begun to be asked about the slaughter, with more than 90 people killed in a new surge of shootings in recent days.

The country’s two most influential Catholic bishops on Sunday spoke against the latest deaths, asking the faithful to pray for the victims.

“We knock on the consciences of those who kill even the helpless, especially those who cover their faces … to stop wasting human lives,” said Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle, archbishop of Manila.

Another senior cleric, Archbishop Socrates Villegas, called for churches to ring their bells every evening at 8 p.m., to stir the consciences of the authorities.

“You shall not kill. That is a sin. That is against the law,” he said in a statement.

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Public anger rose last week when police killed a 17 year-old high-school student.

Television channels aired CCTV footage that showed Kian Loyd Delos Santos being carried by two men to a place where his body was later found, raising doubt about an official report that said he was shot because he fired at police.

Some civil society groups and left-wing activists have called for protests increasing anger with the police was evident in social media posts.

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Metro Manila police chief Oscar Albayalde said he has suspended the police chief in Caloocan City, where the boy was killed, pending an investigation. Three officers involved in the operation were earlier relieved of duties.

The justice department has also begun an investigation while senators will also summon police this week to explain the sudden rise in killings.

(Additional Reporting by Roland Ng; Writing by Manuel Mogato; Editing by Robert Birsel)

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Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

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Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

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Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

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Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

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High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Do Philippine Police Have a “Blank Check” From Congress To Kill People? — Who decides “suspicion of being a drug personality”? — “Senate will act on the deaths of minors in the war on drugs” in the future

August 20, 2017
PNP Director General Ronald dela Rosa answers questions from senators during a Senate hearing on drug killings in August 2016. GEREMY PINTOLO, file
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MANILA, Philippines — Congress should use budget hearings to have the Philippine National Police explain how it will use a proposed P900-million budget for Oplan Double Barrel Reloaded, the campaign against illegal drugs, Senate President Pro Tempore Ralph Recto said Sunday.

In a statement Sunday, Recto said that Congress needs to find out how the program will be implemented. “It should not write a blank check,” Recto, a member of the Senate majority bloc, said.
“PNP will also get a P20-billion increase in its budget next year, to P131.5 billion, from P111.8 billion this year. Para saan ba ang budget na ito? Ano ang mga targets na kakamtin?” he also said.
He said both the Senate and the House of Representatives should look into whether the budget is enough to curb crime like shootings by motorcycle gunmen, and whether the money should be spent on crime deterrence instead.
“Hindi ba mas mainam ang triple patrols kesa dun sa double barrel?” he said.
The statement comes after public outrage over the death of 17-year-old Kian Lloyd delos Santos, who was shot by police in Caloocan City last Wednesday on suspicion of being a drug personality. Police said he resisted arrest but video of the incident belied police reports.

KIAN IS MY SON. Saldy delos Santos holds up his son's school ID, their only proper photo of Kian. Photo by Eloisa Lopez/Rappler

KIAN IS MY SON. Saldy delos Santos holds up his son’s school ID, their only proper photo of Kian. Photo by Eloisa Lopez/Rappler

Some supporters of the war on drugs insist that the shooting was justified and that he should not been out on the streets at night.
His death was just one of scores in so-called “One Time, Big Time” operations by the police last week.
“I expect that the review of the events on that fateful night in Caloocan which led to the death of a young man will be pursued in many fronts,” Recto said.
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A man cries after seeing the body of his relative, an alleged drug dealer killed during a police anti-drug operation, in Manila on August 17, 2017. — AFP

“Kian’s life was ended so dastardly that it has united the nation in anger and grief. This national pain can only be salved by the truth,” the senator said.
Recto said the PNP’s Internal Affairs Service should also justify its budget.
“The IAS is the tripwire of abuses and the whistleblower of bad deeds. Is it doing its job?” he said.
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A Filipino relative weeps near the body of a man who was killed following a police operation against illegal drug in Kaloocan City, north of Manila, Philippines, August 18.//EPA

The IAS decided in favor of Superintendent Marvin Marcos and other police officers charged with homicide over the death of Rolando Espinosa, mayor of Albuera town in Leyte. Espinosa died in government custody as police were implementing a search warrant in his cell at the Baybay jail in November 2016.
“We leave the matter to the Philippine National Police Internal Affairs Service to explain its decision,” Presidential Spokesman Ernesto Abella said in July when Marcos and 18 other police officers were reinstated.
Sen. Grace Poe, also a member of the Senate majority, also called for accountability over Kian’s death.
“Tama rin ang naging statements ng ating mga kasama sa Senado, kailangang malaman talaga natin ang tunay na nangyari bagamat may CCTV,” she said.
“Dapat maparusahan ang mga abusado dito. Nakikita naman natin, maraming nang-aabuso talaga sa programa na ito para pigilin ang paglaganap ng droga. Yung mga wala namang—yung mga inosente, maprotektahan,” she said.
The two senators’ statements are just the latest, with Sen. Nancy Binay — also from the majority bloc — saying Saturday that the Senate will act on the deaths of minors in the war on drugs.
“To the rogue cops, you will have your day in the Senate investigations, you will all be made accountable for murder,” she said.
Binay said that while she supports the government’s campaign against illegal drugs, “we need to stop the trade of illegal drugs at the source.” Both chambers of Congress have been holding hearings on P6.4-billion worth of shabu that slipped through Customs but was later seized at a Valenzuela City warehouse.
Nicanor Faeldon, Customs commissioner, has admitted that corruption still exists at the bureau.
“I also call on the leadership of the PNP to not turn a blind eye to these deaths; and investigate and arrest those responsible for the killings,” Sen. Binay said.
Members of the Senate minority bloc have also called on the Senate to come up with a common stand on the killings.
“We cannot tolerate the alarming police impunity in the country. We need to investigate these killings of alleged drug suspects including a Grade 11 student in police operations,” Sen. Franklin Drilon, minority leader, said.
Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III, who once led the Senate Committee on Justice and Human Rights, has yet to issue a statement as of this post.
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Seventeen-year-old student Kian Loyd delos Santos could have been a policeman, but the policemen who killed him made this dream impossible.

On Wednesday night, August 16, Kian was shot to death in what the police described as a shooting encounter in a dark alley near his house.

CCTV footage and witnesses, however, revealed that he was dragged from one alley to another, past a basketball court, and into a dead-end corner where he was asked to run with a gun – and when he did, was shot.

Kian died wearing a blue shirt and printed boxer shorts – his pantulog or sleepwear, his father said. His dead body was found in fetal position with a gun in his left hand. His father said in media interviews that this detail, alone, could attest to his son’s innocence, since the teenager was not left-handed.

Read the rest:

https://www.rappler.com/nation/179243-kian-loyd-delos-santos-profile

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Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines: Deadliest week in drug war outrages Catholic bishops

August 19, 2017
 
Pablo David, bishop of Caloocan, is seen delivering a lecture in this CBCP News photo.

MANILA, Philippines — Catholic bishops expressed alarm over the recent spate of killings that included a 17-year-old boy.

The death of unarmed 11th grader Kian Lloyd delos Santos in the hands of cops was a highlight of the deadliest week to date in the bloody anti-narcotics campaign that started in June last year with the ascent of Rodrigo Duterte to the presidency.

The campaign left at least 81 people dead in a week, 32 of whom were shot dead in simultaneous police raids in Bulacan province on Tuesday, the deadliest day so far in the controversial drug war, where thousands have died.

ALSO READ: Death of boy, 17, jolts senators to speak against killings

Bishop Jose Oliveros of Malolos, Bulacan did not hesitate to call the incidents in his diocese “extrajudicial killings,” despite Duterte supporters’ rejection of the term.

“We are all concerned about the number of drug related killings in the province because they are mostly, if not all, extra judicial killings,” Oliveros said in a CBCP news report.

The prelate also questioned the motive of the police for the killings that all took in one day.

“We do not know the motivation of the police why they had to do the killings in one day, maybe to impress the president who wanted more,” he said.

Bishop Pablo Virgilio David of Caloocan where Delos Santos was killed also lamented the tragedy, drawing comparisons with the abusive martial law regime of dictator Ferdinand Marcos in the 1970s and 1980s.

During Marcos’ time, “communist” was used as “label and justification” for abductions and killings. “Now, it’s ‘drug suspects.’ I don’t know of any law in any civilized society that says a person deserves to die because he or she is a “drug suspect,” David said.

Referring to the behavior and apparent abuses of cops, David suggested that anyone could be labeled a drug suspect on a whim.

“You might be surprised to find your name in the list one of these days. Anyone can be listed as a ‘drug suspect,” David said in the same CBCP report.

The Catholic Church in the Philippines has put up a quiet resistance to the prevailing narrative of the war on drugs, opening its doors to those on village-level drug watch lists, often the basis of police for new targets.

ALSO READ: The year of Duterte’s dystopian vision

Priests have also been offering their pastorial services to families—such as in buring the dead—whose loved ones died as “drug suspects.”

Police reports would often recount the killings in operations as the result of cops’ self-defense. Reports by eyewitness, the media and human rights organizations over the past months, however, found no proof of suspects supposedly fighting back in many such incidents. — Camille Diola

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/19/1730668/deadliest-week-drug-war-outrages-catholic-bishops

Philippines Cannot Kill Its Way To the End of Illegal Drugs and Addiction

August 18, 2017

Image result for philippines, war on drugs, photos

Above: The body of a man whom police said was killed during a drug-bust operation on “Shabu” (meth), is seen in Manila, Philippines, August 18, 2016. REUTERS/Ezra Acayan

Commentary

By:  – ThINQ Blogger / @inquirerdotnet
 / 05:30 AM August 18, 2017

The “real,” effective and long-term solution to the drug problem is not, believe it or not, EJKs, “tokhang,” or any newfangled, fancily named police or military operation.

Killing suspected drug dealers and pushers or just plain users produces only dead people, while the orphans and widow/ers the killings leave behind become prime candidates for a new generation of addicts.

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a news conference in Davao, Philippines. Thomson Reuters

No, the long-term solution to addiction is behavioral modification through the creation of a “therapeutic community” combined with clinical interventions to address the user’s dependence on drugs and other harmful substances and behavior.

But, as Martin Infante, founder and president of Self Enhancement for Life Foundation (SELF), would himself admit, the process is time-consuming, complicated and subject to ups and downs as the drug dependent or patient struggles with deep-seated issues that underlie the addiction. As Infante once put it: “Relapse is part of recovery.”

A client’s stay at the SELF Center in Talisay, Batangas, ranges from 18 to 22 months, says Infante, with six months of “after-care” during which the graduate joins a work/study program where he or she learns or relearns “discipline and structure” in daily life. A graduate of the program must complete at least one semester in school before being deemed “cured,” adds Infante. And in fact, he says with some astonishment, SELF has so far produced 10 graduates who’ve made it to the Dean’s List in different colleges.

Of course, a “good” postgraduate performance doesn’t guarantee lifelong freedom from drugs or other forms of dependence. In fact, Infante notes, alcoholism is one of the “most difficult” forms of addiction to address or cure. For one, alcohol is far more available and accessible than illicit drugs. Another thing to note is that there is little social condemnation of alcoholism, except perhaps by people most directly affected by it—the alcoholic’s family, work mates and friends.

Still, despite the odds, SELF offers hope to all affected by drugs and other dependencies, including parents, siblings and children, without resorting to the drastic “final solution” of mass killings.

Indeed, SELF is marking its 25th year in September with a series of activities meant to “share its wisdom and experience in a holistic approach to their treatment and rehabilitation,” with the theme “Rekindling Hope and Rebuilding Lives.”

Foremost of these activities is a lecture by Dr. Gregory Bunt, an international expert on addiction medicine, followed by a panel discussion by international practitioners and experts in the therapeutic community approach.

To be held on Sept. 14 at the SMX Aura Function Room 1, the lecture panel will be attended by the families of SELF residents, medical practitioners and students, with slots available for the general public. On Sept. 15, SELF will organize a roundtable with its Council of TC (therapeutic community) Elders and their Asian counterparts, to discuss the future of the TC Federation of South Asia.

But the highlight of the 25th anniversary events, especially for SELF alumni and residents as well as their families, is the fellowship program and show on Sept. 16. It pays tribute to SELF’s 25 years of being a healing community, highlighted by a show mounted by the SELF family and directed by longtime collaborator Fritz Ynfante.

Founded in 1992 by Infante, himself a former drug user, SELF is dedicated to helping afflicted individuals “recover from various addictions and dependencies and to share the experience of the TC’s success with other groups and individuals in the same mission.”

Indeed, despite its “small scale” approach to rehabilitation, given the time, facilities and personnel needed to work with residents, the SELF program offers a valuable alternative mode to the prevailing law enforcement mentality which views the eradication of human beings—users, pushers and dealers—as the preferred solution.

There is hope for addicts and other dependents. They are human beings, after all, and humanity holds within its core the promise of recovery, change and transformation.

ThINQ is the Inquirer’s attempt to highlight in the public space the distinct viewpoints contributed by bloggers covering a wide range of topics and issues.

If you’d like to be included in the ThINQ blogger network, e-mail sara.pacia@inquirer.net with the subject “ThINQ Membership” along with your blog’s URL and topics your blog currently covers.

Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/106439/long-term-solution-drug-problem#ixzz4q7JbqpUH
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Drug ‘personalities’ die in Philippines’ Big Time show

August 18, 2017

AFP

MANILA: It’s just after midnight and Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s One Time Big Time show is getting into full swing as police shoot dead another young “drug personality”.

The corpse is hauled out of one of Manila’s sprawling shantytowns, where so many people have been killed in Duterte’s drug war, and taken to a funeral parlour where other bullet-riddled bodies are lying on bare tables or a bloodied concrete floor.

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte

Each of the dead men has a number in Roman numerals drawn in black pen above their bare feet to help the morticians keep track of the bodies that churn through each night. One of them is marked VI.

The scene on Friday morning offered a haunting vision realised for Duterte, whose campaign stump speech last year included advice to voters to set up funeral parlours because they would be guaranteed money-spinners when he was president.

“The funeral parlours will be packed … I’ll supply the dead bodies,” Duterte said at one rally in the northern Philippines, which attracted typical cheers from Filipinos fed up with crime and attracted by his man-of-the-people charisma.

Duterte easily won the election largely because of his law-and-order platform, which included a vow to eradicate all drugs in society within six months by waging an unprecedented crackdown in which tens of thousands of people would die.

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A man cries after seeing the body of his relative, an alleged drug dealer killed during a police anti-drug operation, in Manila on August 17, 2017. — AFP

During the 14 months Duterte has been in power, police have indeed confirmed killing more than 3,500 people officially termed “drug personalities”.

Unknown assailants have killed at least 2,000 others in drug-related crimes, according to police data, with rights groups attributing those and other unsolved murders to vigilante death squads or off-the-books police killings.

Until recently Duterte had been defiant in the face of criticism that, not only could his extraordinary campaign amount to a crime against humanity, it was bound to fail.

Duterte, 72, continues to insist his tactics are right – while balancing comments such as he would be “happy to slaughter” three million drug addicts with indignant denials that he had ever incited police to act outside the law.

But over the past week, Duterte has begun inserting into his near-daily speeches on the drug war that he is unlikely to achieve his goals by the time he has to stand down as president in 2022.

Duterte has partly blamed a corrupt police force for not being able to complete its mission.

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A Filipino relative weeps near the body of a man who was killed following a police operation against illegal drug in Kaloocan City, north of Manila, Philippines, August 18.//EPA

Fresh offensives

By coincidence or not, police in Manila and surrounding provinces this week launched fresh offensives which led to some of the deadliest days of the drug war.

Continuing a theme of creating jargon that appears to trivialise the killings, police named their raids One Time Big Time campaigns.

The name echoed a defunct television show that had been popular with the tens of millions of poor Filipinos. It had a segment called One Time Big Time in which lucky contestants could win huge amounts of cash.

In the first major One Time Big Time operation this week, police in Bulacan province neighbouring Manila reported killing 32 people on Monday night.

While human rights activists and other critics voiced outrage, Duterte quickly praised the police involved and urged more of the same.

“If we could kill another 32 every day, then maybe we can reduce what ails this country,” Duterte said on Wednesday.

Police reported killing another 25 people that evening, then overnight Thursday and into the early hours of Friday an AFP team witnessed nine other bullet-riddled corpses in funeral parlours, inside slums or on nearby roads.

On one isolated road, a young man without shoes lay with bullet wounds to his head and stomach as a few policemen stood guard before crime scene investigators arrived. A pistol lay just near one of his hands.

One of the policemen said the dead man was a known drug trafficker and they were forced to shoot him in self defence.

Like in the vast majority of the “drug personality” killings, there were no reports of police being wounded or injured.

The investigators stayed for less than 30 minutes before the body was taken away and a police vehicle drove over the scene.

Even if the investigators did find the police account not to be true, Duterte has repeatedly promised to pardon officers if they are found guilty of murder in prosecuting his drug war. — AFP

Philippines ‘War’ On Illegal Drugs: President Duterte admits he miscalculated — Expect more killings over a longer period of time

August 17, 2017
President Rodrigo Roa Duterte shows the updated list of those involved in illegal drugs in his speech during the 19th founding anniversary of the Volunteers Against Crime and Corruption (VACC) in Malacañan Palace on August 16, 2017. REY BANIQUET/PRESIDENTIAL PHOTO

Rody admits mistake in 6-month deadline

MANILA, Philippines – Expect more drug killings throughout the term of President Duterte, who admitted yesterday that he had miscalculated the extent of the drug menace and his capability to stop it.

With his home city of Davao as his template, the President said he had believed he could also eradicate the drug problem nationwide in just six months.

“Alam ko na nagkamali ako. Nagkamali talaga ako. Hindi ko naman talaga akalain, iyang Bureau of Customs na iyan, akala ko kaalyado ko (I know I made a mistake. I really made a mistake. I really never thought that Bureau of Customs, I thought it’s an ally),” he said in remarks before Ozamiz City police officers and men.

“How can I control it in three to six months? The generals and policemen are involved. The Bureau of Customs, an agency I am relying on, son of a b****, is into drugs. How will I succeed?”

Duterte also argued that the drug war has been curtailing the freedoms of citizens.

The President cited the case of the Parojinogs, one of the political clans accused of having ties with drug syndicates. Police killed Ozamiz City mayor Reynaldo Parojinog Sr., his wife and several others on July 30 after they allegedly fought it out with policemen serving search warrants.

“The people here (in Ozamiz) have tasted patronage politics… You will be next. Follow them and you will be next. I will not stop this… I said to the police and the military: destroy the apparatus, the organization of drug syndicates,” the President said.

“Kaya ikaw ‘pag namatay kayo, ma-mayor ka, ma-congressman, gobernador ka, pasensya ka (Now, you die. If you are a mayor, a congressman, a governor, if you get killed, sorry). That is my order,” he added.

“I hope that I can get rid of it before I go out of my office. I hope I will witness it. Dahan-dahanin ko lang ‘yan sila (I will do it slowly).”

He said in jest that those he would spare would be sent on a ship to the South Pole and left to fend for themselves.

Duterte projected himself as a no-nonsense, tough-talking crime buster during the campaign, leading him to win the 2016 presidential race by a landslide.

The longtime Davao City mayor, who vowed to suppress narcotics in six months, got more than 16 million votes, beating his more moneyed rivals, all of whom had previously held national posts.

In September 2016, Duterte sought a six-month extension for his drug crackdown, saying he was shocked by the magnitude of the problem. He later admitted that the drug menace could not be solved easily and that the crackdown would have to continue until the end of his six-year term.

“I said my critics were right. You said, when you become president, you can do it in three to six months. I was not aware of the problem when I assumed office. Davao was just my template. There were drugs there but if you bring drugs there, you will die,” Duterte said.

He also maintained that the Philippines has degenerated into a “narcotic country.”

“Now, you ask, the Philippines, are we or are we not a narcotic country? Yes, we are,” Duterte said.

“I did not know it when I was still mayor… Now that I am President, I told governors and mayors, do not ever f*** with drugs because if you destroy my country, I will kill you. I have been repeating that.”

Thousands have died since Duterte launched his bloody war on drugs but figures released by the government and civil society contradict each other.

Previous reports have placed the death toll at around 9,000 but police officials claimed only about 3,000 drug personalities have been killed in law enforcement operations.

The anti-drugs campaign has drawn flak from human rights groups in the country and abroad but Duterte has refused to listen to his critics, whom he accused of trivializing the drug problem.

“Human rights, wala akong pakialam sa inyo. May trabaho ako at gagawin ko (I do not care about what you say. I have a work to do and I will do it),” the President said.

Duterte said his fight against illegal drugs would not spare anyone, not even his friends.

“Walang kaibi-kaibigan sa akin. Either patayin kita o patayin mo ako. Pareho lang sa akin (Friendships don’t matter to me. Either I kill you or you kill me. It’s the same for me). Just stop playing with drugs,” the President said.

Duterte reiterated that he would protect policemen who would face charges in connection with the drug war, even promising to pardon and promote them in case they get convicted.

“My warning is this: do not lie to me. Just tell me the truth because there is always a remedy. In the performance of duty, you’ll have no problems,” he added.

Duterte also warned policemen engaged in illegal drugs, saying he has offered P2-million bounty each for their arrest.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/18/1730277/6-years-drug-war

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

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Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippine National Police Chief: Deaths in anti-drug ops are “just usual” — “The problem is still there” — “We still need to step up”

August 17, 2017

By Allan Nawal – Correspondent / @inqmindanaoInquirer Mindanao / 04:11 PM August 17, 2017

Image may contain: 1 person, text

PNP Chief General Ronald dela Rosa
EDWIN BACASMAS/INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

OZAMIZ CITY—Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Dir. Gen. Ronald dela Rosa said there was nothing unusual in the deaths of some suspects during anti-drug operations because these individuals really put up a fight.

Dela Rosa said what would be unusual if all those being arrested during the so-called “one-time, big-time” operations had been shot dead.

“Magtaka kayo kung patay lahat. Marami namang buhay na nahuli (You should start to wonder if everyone is dead. There were suspects arrested and they are alive),” he said in a speech before members of the city’s police force on Thursday.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Police start to investigate after shooting an apparent drug dealer in Manila. Photograph: Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

 

Despite the deaths related to the police anti-drug operations, Dela Rosa said the PNP “still needs to step up.”

“The problem is still there,” he said.

Dela Rosa also urged policemen to just do their job and avoid politics.

“We should not care about politics, we should just maintain order and safety,” he added. JPV

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/923476/pnp-war-on-drugs-pnp-chief-ronald-dela-rosa-government-anti-drug-war-bulacan-raids-mpd-anti-drug-ops#ixzz4q0YDJYM4
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Related:
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Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

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Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

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.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

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 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Philippines war on drugs intensifies, at least 58 killed this week — Duterte tells police to shoot human rights workers “if they get in the way”

August 17, 2017

MANILA (Reuters) – At least 26 people died overnight in police operations in the Philippines capital Manila, authorities said on Thursday, a second night of heavy bloodshed this week in an intensification of President Rodrigo Duterte’s fierce war on drugs and crime.

The killings across Manila followed 32 deaths in near-simultaneous police raids on Monday night in Bulacan province, which borders the capital. Together, they mark the deadliest period of a drugs-focused crackdown that has killed thousands of Filipinos, and caused international alarm, since Duterte took office over a year ago.

Colonel Erwin Margarejo, spokesman for Manila police, described the raids that started late Wednesday in Manila as “one-time, big-time” operations, the same term used by police in Bulacan, who said the victims died because they chose to put up a fight.

“This is ‘one-time, big-time’ operations, so it is not focused only on drugs, we are operating also against other street crimes, like robbery, but these people could also be under the influence of drugs,” Margarejo said.

“If they resisted violently, our police have to defend themselves.”

In this Sept. 5, 2016 photo, police inspect the site where alleged drug user Marcelo Salvador was shot dead by unidentified men in Las Pinas, south of Manila, Philippines. Drug dealers and drug addicts, were being shot by police or slain by unidentified gunmen in mysterious, gangland-style murders that were taking place at night. Salvador became a victim, the casualty of a vicious war on drugs that has claimed thousands of lives as part of a campaign by Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. AP Photo/Aaron Favila
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Duterte unleashed his crackdown the day he took office on June 30 last year after a convincing win in an election in which he campaigned heavily on a promise to use deadly force to wipe out crime and drugs.

It was not immediately clear what was behind the step-up in the number of coordinated police operations this week, but Duterte gave a clear indication on Wednesday that it had his blessing.

He said it was good that 32 criminals had been killed in Bulacan, then added: “Let’s kill another 32 every day. Maybe we can reduce what ails this country.”

Manila police chief Oscar Albayalde said there had been no instruction to change or increase the scale and scope of the anti-drugs campaign.

“This is just part of our ‘one-time, big-time’ operations against illegal drugs,” he told Reuters.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Police start to investigate after shooting an apparent drug dealer in Manila. Photograph: Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

‘GRAVE DANGER’

Duterte also chided human rights groups on Wednesday for getting in the way of his anti-drugs campaign and said police should shoot them if they obstructed justice, a remark the New York-based Human Rights Watch said puts activists “in grave danger”.

Its deputy Asia director, Phelim Kine, described the comments as “like painting a target on the backs of courageous people working to protect the rights and upholding the dignity of all Filipinos.”

The exact number of people killed during the war on drugs is difficult to quantify, with no independent statistics available and police providing comprehensive data only for deaths during anti-drugs operations, where official accounts typically say suspects resisted arrest.

From the start of the drugs war to the end of July, police said over 3,400 people were killed in their operations. Police said about 2,100 deaths among some 13,500 murders over the same period were drugs-related, attributed to turf wars, informants being silenced, or vigilantes killing drug users.

Image may contain: 5 people, people smiling, crowd and outdoor

Residents near a crime scene where three alleged drug dealers were killed after a raid in Manila. Photograph: Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

A total of 65 policemen have been killed on the job during this time.

Critics maintain that members of the Philippine National Police (PNP) are executing suspects and say it is likely they have a hand in thousands of unsolved murders of drug users by mysterious vigilantes. The PNP and government reject that.

Although the violence has been criticized by much of the international community, Filipinos largely support the campaign and domestic opposition to it has been muted.

Several Senate hearings into allegations that Duterte operated a death squad when he was a city mayor and was now using the same approach on a national scale have been inconclusive, while an impeachment complaint filed earlier this year was dismissed by Congress.

National police chief Ronald dela Rosa told reporters on Wednesday there would be no let-up in the war on drugs.

“This is unrelenting, we will continue to operate until the end,” he said.

(This version of the story corrects number in headline to 58)

Additional reporting by Dondi Tawatao and Karen Lema; Writing by Martin Petty; Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan

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Duterte: Shoot CHR personnel if they obstruct justice

MANILA, Philippines (First Published 10:05 p.m.) — President Rodrigo Duterte on Wednesday said security forces should shoot Commission on Human Rights personnel if they are found to be obstructing justice.

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The president also threatened to have the CHR investigated for conspiracy following its investigations into the circumstances surrounding the death of suspected drug suspects and criminals, contradicting an earlier assurance from the Palace that Duterte is aware that independent bodies such as the CHR have roles to perform.

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This statement is the latest in the chief executive’s tirades against the body, which has included a threat to abolish in the past, a remark that he has since dismissed as a “joke.”
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Duterte did not hide his anger at the CHR on Wednesday night.
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“One of these days, kayong human rights, kayong imbestigahan ko. Conspiracy. If they are obstructing justice, you shoot them,” the hot-tempered Duterte said during the anniversary of the Volunteers Against Crime and Corruption.
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He again returned to his usual refrain against the government body, saying that it is not protecting nor advocating for the rights of crime victims and government personnel.
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“Basta human rights, ilang biktima na rito. Yung lima na namatay, yung one-year-old na ginulgol doon. Yung human rights na yan nasaan? They could not even utter it in public na, ‘Look, do not do that to me.’ Ganito ‘yan e,” he said.
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CHR: We are just doing our constitutional duty

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The CHR on Wednesday night again stressed it is only doing its job when it probes potential rights violations by government personnel.

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“The Commission wishes to reiterate that it is merely doing its constitutional duty and it remains hopeful that the government will recognize that the guarantee of equal protection of the law as well as fair and impartial trial including investigation is a constitutional right available to every single Filipino,” Jacqueline de Guia, CHR spokesperson, said in a statement.
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The Palace recently said that Duterte would not meddle with plans to probe the drug raid in Ozamiz City that led to the death of 15 people, including its former mayor, Reynaldo Parojinog Sr.
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Menardo Guevarra, senior deputy executive secretary, said that as a lawyer, Duterte is aware that the CHR had a mandate to fulfill.
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“He (Duterte) is also a lawyer and he knows that these other agencies have their own mandates, have their own procedures. So they are free to do what they want to do in accordance with their own mandates,” Guevarra said in a press briefing.
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‘Investigate NPA’

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After Duterte’s second State of the Nation Address in July, he also called out the CHR for its alleged failure to investigate crimes committed by non-state actors such as the New People’s Army against the government.

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“Patas tayo. Justice for all. What is sauce for the gander is sauce for the goose,” the chief executive said in a media conference after his speech.

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The CHR said that its mandate was to be the watchdog against government abuses and not to implement laws that would stop crime.

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It could also investigate other cases that involve vulnerable sectors, according to De Guia.

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“We do that [investigation] kapag vulnerable sector at tsaka yung IHL (International Humanitarian Law),” she said. The commission has, in the past, condemned the Abu Sayyaf for beheading hostages.

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http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/17/1729880/duterte-shoot-chr-personnel-if-they-obstruct-justice

Related:

After Philippine Police Kill 32 Drug Suspects in One Day; President Duterte Urges Them To Kill 32 More The Next Day

August 16, 2017
Duterte yesterday said authorities should kill more pushers to reduce the drug problem plaguing the country. PPD/File

MANILA, Philippines –  President Duterte welcomed the killing of 32 drug suspects in simultaneous raids in Bulacan last Tuesday and defended policemen from critics who questioned the way the operations were conducted.

Duterte yesterday said authorities should kill more pushers to reduce the drug problem plaguing the country.

“Yung namatay daw sa Bulacan, 32 (Thirty-two people reportedly died in Bulacan) in a massive raid. Maganda yun (That’s good),” the President said at the 19th anniversary of the Volunteers Against Crime and Corruption at Malacañang.

“Pumatay tayo (Let’s kill) another 32 everyday, maybe we can reduce what ails this country,” he added.

Thirty-two suspected drug offenders died and 107 others were nabbed during simultaneous law enforcement operations, which began last Monday in the province. Police recovered illegal drugs, grenades and firearms during the raids.

The President said he is expecting human rights advocates to criticize the law enforcement operations.

“There will be outcry again over the 32 who were killed. They would grieve again for justice,” he said.

“Many are being killed because policemen are working. They are protected under my watch.”

Duterte said he has ordered security forces to destroy the apparatus of the drug trade, which he said is “taking a toll on the lives of the people.”

“My order is to destroy the apparatus. Kung napatay ka, pasensya ka (If you get killed, sorry). We will finish this for the next generation,” he said.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/08/17/1729961/rody-bulacan-drug-deaths-kill-32-more-daily

*******************************************************

Duterte says drug problem can’t be solved in just one term

President Rodrigo Duterte vowed during the campaign period that he can fix the country from illegal drugs in three to six months. File photo

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte admitted that the country’s illegal drugs problem is so severe that a six-year term for a president is not enough to solve it.

“Look itong shabu, ang drugs, etc., cannot be solved by one man, for a president for one term,” Duterte said in his speech at the Philippine Development Forum: Sulong Pilipinas 2017 forum last Wednesday.

“It has bugged nations, hindi nga kaya ng Amerika, tayo pa,” he added.

READ: Duterte vows to keep drug war amid human rights concerns

 

During the campaign period, Duterte vowed to solve the problem in three to six months.

Three months after assuming presidency in July, the president asked for an extension of another six months.

READ: Rights groups want tougher stance on Duterte’s drug war from Trump

http://www.philstar.com/news-videos/2017/08/11/1727928/watch-duterte-says-drug-problem-cant-be-solved-just-one-term

Related:

Photos obtained by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism show the body of Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. lying flat on his back with his eyes half-open, and both of his hands empty. He was killed while in police custody during a “jail house shoot out” with police. All the police involved were exonerated and returned to duty. Image obtained by PCIJ/Nancy Carvajal
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Related:
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Image may contain: one or more people and people sitting

Credit: Raffy Lerma—Philippine Daily Inquirer

.

Image may contain: one or more people, shoes and outdoor

Philippine drug war. Credit: Alecs Ongcal

 (The Philippines seems to be siding with China, Russia and Iran)

.
.
Image may contain: outdoor
Discarded — The body of a dead Filipino girl — killed in President Duterte’s war on drugs — looks like it has been put out with the trash….. Presidential spokeman Abella said the war on drugs is for the next generation of Filipinos.
.

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Image result for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (L) talks to Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronald Dela Rosa. AFP photo

Image may contain: 1 person

Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa

Philippines: Human Rights Watch director Phelim Kine also said the numbers of fatalities in the drug war launched by President Rodrigo Duterte when he assumed office on June 30, 2016, are “appalling but predictable” since he (Duterte) vowed to “forget the laws on human rights.”

Image result for Boy Cruz, philippine policeman, photos

Philippines Policeman found tortured and strangled after some fellow police said he was involved in the illegal drug trade. Photo Credit Boy Cruz

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/08/1600763/cop-linked-drugs-tortured-killed

 (December 23, 2016)

.

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

 (Philippine Star, December 1, 2016)

“They are afraid the incident could cause President Duterte to declare martial law. I talked with some sultans and ulamas and elders here… and that’s what they have told me,” Ponyo said.

 (November 30, 2016)

Image may contain: 2 people, beard

High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein. UN Photo, Jean-Marc Ferré

Summary executions of supposed drug dealers and other criminals have become a common occurence in recent weeks. The STAR/Joven Cagande, file

 (November 16, 2016)

 (August 10, 2016)

Davao City’s Ronald dela Rosa has been appointed to become the next chief of the Philippine National Police to lead President-elect Rodrigo Duterte’s planned crackdown on illegal drugs. Facebook/Dela Rosa
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Crime scene investigators examine a vehicle used by two drug suspects killed during an alleged shootout with officers along NIA Road in Quezon City on June 21, 2016. JOVEN CAGANDE/file
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President Rodrigo Duterte's crusade against drug users and dealers is controversial

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry's Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers burying cadavers in various stages of decomposition in a mass grave in Manila, after health officials recovered the cadavers from Henry’s Funeral Home. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.

A worker arranging cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila. Picture: AFP/ Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Health officials closed Henry's Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Health officials closed Henry’s Funeral Home after recovering at least 120 unclaimed and rotting cadavers in Manila. The city health department conducted a surprise raid after receiving complaints about a foul odour coming from the funeral parlour. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry's Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.

Workers carrying cadavers in various stages of decomposition at the morgue of Henry’s Funeral Homes in Manila, October 2016. Picture: AFP / Noel Celis.Source:AFP